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Full text of "Cornell University- New York Hospital School of Nursing Announcement"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/cornelluniversit19501955corn 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



^ 



JULY 29, 1950 



Cornell University — New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1950-1951 SESSIONS 



3o?c-/->~ 



Term Dates 1950-1951 

Oct. 2, 1950 — Jan. 21, 1951 

Jan. 22, 1951 — May 13, 1951 

May 14, 1951— Sept. 30, 1951 

Oct. 1, 1951— Jan. 20, 1952 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of 
New York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from 
York Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is reached most easily through the main 
entrance of the Hospital on East 68th Street (east of York Ave- 
nue) . The Nurses Residence is at the corner of York Avenue and 
70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus, M-7, east-bound, runs to the 
Medical Center. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 42, July 29, 1950, Number 3. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1950-1951 

525 EAST 68TH STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Contents 



Calendar 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim of the School 5 

History 5 

Facilities for Instruction 7 

Accreditation of School 9 

State Registration for Graduates 9 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 10 

Fees and Expenses 14 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 15 

Health Service 16 

Vacations and Absences 17 

Student Life and Activities 18 

Basic Nursing Program 21 

Description of Courses 25 

Administration 32 

Faculty 34 

Associated with the Faculty 38 

Students in the School 42 

Form of Bequest 45 

Index 47 



(Picture Credits: Ben Greenhaus) 



Calendar 



Sept. 


26 Tuesday 


Sept. 


30 Saturday 


Oct. 


12 Thursday 


Nov. 


23 Thursday 


Dec. 


23 Saturday 


Dec. 


25 Monday 


Jan. 


1 Monday 


Feb. 


12 Monday 


Feb. 


22 Thursday 


May 


30 Wednesday 


July 


4 Wednesday 


Sept. 


3 Monday 


Sept. 


24 Monday 


Sept. 


29 Saturday 


Oct. 


12 Friday 


Nov. 22 Thursday 


Dec. 


24 Monday 


Dec. 


25 Tuesday 



1950 

Commencement 

Registration of freshmen students 

Holiday (except for freshmen) : Columbus Day 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1951 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 
Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
Holiday: Memorial Day 
Holiday: Independence Day 
Holiday: Labor Day 
Commencement 

Registration of freshmen students 
Holiday: Columbus Day 
Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 
Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 
Holiday: Christmas Day 



Jan. 1 Tuesday 

Feb. 12 Tuesday 
Feb. 22 Friday 
May 30 Friday 
July 4 Friday 



1952 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 
Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
Holiday: Memorial Day 
Holiday: Independence Day 



Career Opportunities in Nursing 



More nurses are needed every day. This is a reflection of the grow- 
ing desire on the part of the public, not only for care during illness, 
but also for the information and the services which will help them 
keep well. Nursing is recognized as one of the vital health services 
of the world. 

Career opportunities are many and varied. The scope of activity 
of the modern graduate nurse is limited only by her interests, abilities 
and preparation. Her services may influence the welfare of a single 
patient, a community or a nation. Today, more nurses are actively 
practicing their profession than ever before — 300,533. Yet, the U. S. 
Department of Labor estimates that by 1955 there will be a need for 
477,700 professional nurses in this country alone. 

The well-educated, well-prepared young woman faces a broad chal- 
lenge. Schools, industry, local and national health agencies are seeking 
her assistance. Old hospitals are expanding and new ones are being 
built, with patient registrations increasing daily. The United States 
Public Health Service is reaching out to more and more people; Con- 
gress yearly enacts legislation making available additional health facil- 
ities to new groups of citizens. Visiting nurse services are multiplying. 
There can be no doubt that our nation is awake to the fact that the 
health of the people is one of its most important resources. 

Like other practitioners in the health services, the professional nurse 
often prepares herself as a specialist in one of the clinical fields such 
as psychiatry, pediatrics, or obstetrics. With advanced experience and 
preparation she may wish to undertake administrative or teaching 
responsibilities. 

Modern therapeutic procedures have become increasingly complex 
and there is constantly greater understanding of the inter-relationship 
between the individual's physical health and his social and psychologi- 
cal well-being. These facts make it necessary for the effective nurse to 
be a person who is professionally prepared in the broadest sense of the 
word. She must not only possess manual dexterity and skill but must 
have an understanding of human behavior and of the world in which 
we live. 

If nurses are to accept the responsibilities which the health needs of 
the nation and of the world are placing upon them, the foundation foi 
their practice must be laid in a sound general and professional edu- 
cation. 



The Aim of the School 



It is the aim of this School of Nursing to offer the carefully selected 
student preparation which will qualify her for professional practice in 
first-level positions in any branch of nursing, and at the same time to 
guide her development as an individual and a citizen. 



History 



This School of Nursing was one of the first to be founded in the 
United States; it is seventy-three years old. As early as 1799, Dr. Val- 
entine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician, organized a series 
of lectures for nurses combined with a course of practical instruction 
on the wards. Although the theoretical content was meager and the 
practical instruction not systematically planned, these classes focused 
attention on the fact that women who had some preparation for their 
work gave better care to patients than those without instruction. Each 
year the program was amplified and in 1877 a formal training school 
for nurses was established "to consist of one teacher and 24 pupils." 

GROWTH OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

The school was for many years an integral part of The New York 
Hospital, the second oldest hospital in America maintained by private 
endowment. George the Third of England granted the Hospital its 
charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title of The 
Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. This title 
:0 was changed in 1810 to the present one of The Society of the New 
York Hospital. While its roots extend far into the past, the Hospital 
has consistently been sensitive and responsive to the changing needs of 
the community and to the progress of science. One evidence of this has 
been the gradual increase in the functions and size of the institution, 
which has necessitated expansion and re-location to correspond with 
the growth of the city and with the increasing scope of knowledge 
related to health. The present site and buildings are the third it 
has occupied. 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SCHOOL BECOMES PART OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

The program and organization of the School of Nursing has grown 
and changed to keep pace with the health needs of society. The first 
course was eighteen months in length. After thirteen years this was in- 
creased to twenty-four months and in 1896 to three years. It was fitting 
that in 1942, on the 65th anniversary of the founding of the school, it 
should have become a part of Cornell University, thus making avail- 
able the resources of two great institutions, each of which has a long 
history and a notable record of achievement in the fields of education 
and public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
Government's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
under the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object 
shall be ... to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a re- 
markable system of higher education. However, it received its greatest 
impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under 
the influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first 
president, determined the form of the new University. In 1864, an 
agreement was reached with the legislature of New York State which 
resulted in the founding of "a University of a new type ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study." This com- 
bination of federal, state and private interests and resources is unique. 
It gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policies 
of the University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

One field of service after another has found preparation for its 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an association 
between the Cornell University Medical College and The New York 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the two 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructed 
buildings of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the 
East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for nursing was 
first brought under the auspices of the LIniversity in July, 1942, when, 
by agreement between the Trustees of the University and the Gover- 
nors of The New York Hospital, the School of Nursing, long con- 
ducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made a school 
in the University. 



Facilities for Instruction 



Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the 
nursing school. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, 
laboratories and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching 
unit on the second floor of the Nurses Residence, while others are pro- 
vided in the Hospital and in the Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all the 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various community 
agencies of the city. 

LIBRARIES 

The library of the school contains a wide selection of materials on 
nursing and related fields, including complete sets of important 
medical and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. It is under the 
direction of a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library of 
the medical college are readily accessible and supplement those of the 
nursing school in such a way as to make available unusual resources to 
both the students and faculty of the school. A librarian is in attendance 
in both libraries. The open-shelf system prevails throughout, thereby 
permitting free access to all books. Additional small libraries are ad- 
jacent to the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors in all 
departments. Through the New York Public Library, valuable sup- 
plementary materials are placed at the disposal of instructors and 
students as needed. 

WIDE EXPERIENCE IN CLINICAL SERVICES 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsurpassed 
for the care and study of patients. The Hospital is comprised of five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both 
in-patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching 
and for the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized 
clinical services are therefore available which are seldom found within 
a single organization. The Hospital has a capacity of over 1,100 beds 
and during the past year 22,181 patients were admitted, exclusive of 
newborns. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives 
the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the 
part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Authenticity of the findings in such studies depends in no small degree 
on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the special- 
ties of communicable disease (including tuberculosis) , medical neu- 
rology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat disorders, ortho- 
pedic, plastic and neuro-surgery, and ophthalmology. The Woman's 
Clinic has a capacity of 204 adults and 112 newborns and provides 
for obstetric and gynecologic patients. During the past year 3,913 
babies were born in this clinic. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 95 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children and the services 
of a play therapist offer opportunities for the student of nursing to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick 
children. There is a nursery school within the Division of Child 
Development. Here the student works with and observes the develop- 
ment of the normal child, and is thus better able to evaluate devia- 
tions from the normal which may accompany illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity 
of 109 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational 
and recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of the 
mentally ill. The close connection between the psychiatric medical 
and nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a 
consultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the 
relationship between mental and physical illness throughout her ex- 
perience in the Hospital. 

OUT-PATIENT SERVICES 

The Out-Patient Department provides excellent opportunity for the 
study of patients who are treated without being admitted to the Hos- 
pital. Last year there were 282,519 visits to this Department, an aver- 
age of 980 each clinic day. Opportunity is provided for participation 
in the instruction and guidance of expectant mothers through mothers' 
classes, family studies, and nutrition conferences. Students participate 
in various aspects of the treatment and follow-up on venereal diseases 
and many other activities related to the care of patients coming to the 
Out-Patient Department. 



ACCREDITATION OF SCHOOL 9 

PUBLIC HEALTH AFFILIATIONS 

Experience in the health teaching and in the nursing care of patients 
in their homes is afforded through cooperation with the Visiting Nurse 
Service of New York, the Department of Educational Nursing of the 
Community Service Society of New York, and other community agen- 
cies. The Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center, the Lenox Hill Neigh- 
borhood House, and the Guggenheim Dental Clinic, all located within 
two blocks of the Hospital, are some of the agencies which offer 
convenient opportunity for student observations of community health 
programs. 

The staffs of the Social Service Departments of the Center partici- 
pate in the instruction of student nurses through lectures, conferences, 
and case discussions. 

Accreditation of School 

This school is accredited by the New York State Department of Edu- 
cation and is an active member of the Association of Collegiate Schools 
of Nursing. It is also accredited by the National Nursing Accrediting 
Service as one of the few schools which prepare students for first level 
positions in public health nursing in addition to preparing them for 
first level positions in hospitals and in other fields of nursing. 

State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates are eligible for admission to the examination for licensure 
administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are expected 
to take the first examination given after completion of the nursing 
course. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the gradu- 
ate of the school as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New 
York. Having become registered in New York State makes it possible 
to apply for registration without examination in other states. In 
New York State, citizenship, or declared intention of becoming a 
citizen, is required. If citizenship is not completed within seven years 
from the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

The New York State Practice Act states that a nurse must be licensed 
by examination in the state in which she graduated. For this reason, 
graduates of this school are urged to take State Board examinations 
in New York State rather than in another state as they may wish to 
practice in New York State at a future date. 



Requirements for 
Admission and Graduation 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students enter the School of Nursing on the recommendation 
of the faculty Committee on Admissions which reviews all applica- 
tions. Since nursing requires women of integrity, of high intelligence, 
and with a deep interest in public service, those candidates are selected 
whose credentials indicate high rank in scholarship, personal fitness 
for nursing, maturity, and good general health. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifica- 
tions, there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is ex- 
pected that applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. 
The results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a 
dental examination must be submitted at the time of application. 
Inoculation against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox 
will be required of all students before admission to the school. 

EDUCATIONAL REQUISITES 

The minimum educational requisites for admission are satisfactory 
completion of at least two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive 
of physical education) . The applicant may take her college work at 
Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, or at any university or senior 
or junior college accredited by one of the regional associations of 
colleges and secondary schools. 

It is not necessary for the work of these two years to be part of a 
designated "Nursing" or "Pre-Nursing" course. Excellent preparation 
is possible through other programs of study, such as Liberal Arts or 
Home Economics. 

Because the work of the nurse requires that she have an understand- 
ing of human reactions and of social factors influencing community 
development, that she be able to express herself well and participate in 
community planning for nursing services, it is important that she 

10 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 11 

obtain a sound background in history, psychology and other social 
sciences, as well as in literature, English, and foreign languages. With 
the exception of psychology, indicated below, specific requirements in 
these subjects are not laid down because a variety of satisfactory com- 
binations can be accepted. A sound two-year liberal arts program serves 
as the best foundation on which to build all professional advancement. 

Physical and biological sciences are important in the preparation for 
admission, but should not be taken at the expense of the subjects re- 
ferred to above. Obviously, the young woman who can devote more 
than two years to her liberal arts preparation has more leeway to in- 
clude several science courses in her college work as well as further 
general academic courses. Unquestionably this would be desirable in 
preparation for many positions in the field of nursing. 

In addition to the academic and health requirements, consideration 
will be given to the applicant's personal fitness for nursing. 

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

Within the two-year liberal arts program required for admission, 
indicated above, the only specific requirements are as follows: 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Psychology 3 credit hours 

Human Anatomy, Physiology and Bacteriology are not accepted 
as fulfilling the 6-hour credit required in biological science as 
these are included in the professional program. 
Not more than 12 hours of biological science will be counted to- 
ward meeting the 60 credit hours required for admission. 

In general, the principle applies that those courses given within the 
School of Nursing cannot be credited toward meeting admission re- 
quirements, because there is no allowance within the professional cur- 
riculum for electives. 

It is suggested that you take this bulletin with you each time you 
register for your program in your first two years of college, and show 
this section to your adviser, who will help you in selection of courses 
to meet these requirements. Applicants who do not meet in full the 
specific subject requirements for admission, but who have a good 
record of two or more years of college, are encouraged to communicate 
with the Dean of the School of Nursing for consideration of the credits 
which can be offered. Assistance can also be given in arranging plans 
for taking required subjects in summer session. 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the 
form at the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain 
psychometric tests are required before admission. The applicant is 
asked to meet the charge of $5.00 for these tests. 

Arrangements for a personal interview will be made with the ap- 
plicant whose record shows promise of meeting the requirements of the 
school. She will meet with a member of the Committee on Admissions 
of the school in New York, or, if this is not practicable, with an alumna 
or other qualified person designated by the Committee and living in 
the vicinity of the applicant. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon noti- 
fication of acceptance to the school. The full amount is credited to- 
ward fees payable at registration. The deposit is not refundable if the 
candidate withdraws her application. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible, so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible edu- 
cational background preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal applica- 
tion should be made during the second term of the first college year, 
if the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college year. 
When reports are in for work completed during the first college year 
and for the psychometric test and they appear to be satisfactory, the 
applicant will be accepted, pending satisfactory fulfillment of all re- 
quirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 
PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

The established system of grading is a scale of F to A, with D as 
the lowest passing grade. An average of C for each term is required 
for promotion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
courses Nursing Arts I, Nursing Arts II, Pharmacology I. A grade be- 
low C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which 
is less than C places a student on condition. This must be removed 
by the end of the next term to insure further promotion. A student 
on condition must observe certain limitations in relation to her social 
activities. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 13 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the 
judgment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she 
can complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable length of 
time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, 
in which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the 
instructor, if the course is available. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the 
student to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory 
to it. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a 
Promotion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice 
and her relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into ac- 
count. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her 
work and who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the 
qualifications which are important for a good nurse may be put on 
condition or asked to withdraw from the school. The school reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of 
the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for nursing. The student is kept informed of her progress 
through individual term conferences, and every effort is made to pro- 
vide assistance and guidance which will help her succeed in the school. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The Society of 
the New York Hospital. In order to qualify for the degree and diploma, 
the student must maintain a cumulative average of C for the three- 
year program, and must have completed satisfactorily all of the theory 
and practice outlined in this catalogue. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before admis- 
sion may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience, thus 
reducing her time in the school by two to four months. An average of 
B in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for favor- 
able consideration. Exemption must be requested at the beginning of 
the last term of the second year. 



Fees and Expenses 



Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as follows: 

First Second Third 

FEES Year Year Year Total 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 200.00 $150.00 $100.00 450.00 

Public Health Affiliation 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 3.00 3.00 3.00 9.00 

Health 12.00 12.00 12.00 36.00 

Graduation 25.00 25.00 

Student Organization 5.25 5.25 5.25 15.75 



$260.25 $170.25 $205.25 $635.75 

OTHER EXPENSES (Subject to variation) 

Aprons and accessories of uniforms $ 34.50 $ 34.50 

Uniform shoes 12.95 $ 12.95 25.90 

Uniform sweater 5.00 5.00 

Uniform cape (optional) 18.90 18.90 

Gymnasium suit 11.00 11.00 

Books, keys, bandage scissors, and 

miscellaneous (approx.) 40.00 $ 5.00 5.00 50.00 

Rental laboratory coat 1.00 1.00 

Rental public health uniform 5.00 5.00 

Miscellaneous expenses in connection 

with field trips, etc. 2.00 2.00 30.00 34.00 



$125.35 $ 7.00 $ 52.95 $185.30 

TOTAL FEES AND EXPENSES $385.60 $177.25 $258.20 $821.05 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is required. This 
is credited toward the tuition for the first year but is not refundable if 
the application is withdrawn. The $200.00 tuition for the first year is 
payable as follows: $25.00 upon acceptance, $125.00 at registration, and 
$50.00 at the beginning of the second term. Other first year fees are 
payable at registration. 

14 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 15 

Students will be billed in advance for second and third year fees 
which become due on the first day of the Fall term of each year. These 
fees must be paid not later than twenty days after the date they are 
due. An exception is the fee for graduation which is due on the first day 
of the Summer term in the third year and is payable within twenty 
days of that date. This fee is refundable if the student is not graduated. 
The Student Organization fee is payable to the class treasurer. All 
fees and expenses incurred during the program must be paid before 
graduation. 

The school reserves the right to change its fees as necessary to con- 
form with economic trends. 

None of the articles listed under "Other Expenses" should be ob- 
tained before admission to the school. Uniform accessories, shoes, and 
sweater will be ordered after registration and are paid for upon de- 
livery. Estimated expenses for books include approximately $10.00 for 
optional purchases. A list of necessary personal equipment and the 
fees payable on registration day will be sent to each student when ac- 
cepted for admission. 

MAINTENANCE 

Full maintenance is provided each student without cost. This in- 
cludes room, cash for purchase of meals ($22.40 every two weeks except 
during vacations) and a reasonable laundry allowance. The necessary 
dresses (except the public health uniform) and caps are provided 
without charge. Items of the uniform for which the student pays are 
listed under "Other Expenses." 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 



FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Committee for Scholarships for the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, a committee of lay women, makes 
available a fund from which a few scholarships are awarded each year, 
usually in amounts of $100, $200, and $300. These scholarships are 
open to both entering students and students already in the school 
when need is a factor. They are awarded on the basis of the student's 
all-round record as indicated by academic work, participation in school 
and community activities, and qualities indicating promise of growth 
and a contribution to nursing. 



i6 , SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Application is made to the Dean. Scholarships to entering students 
are made on recommendation of the Admissions Committee, and an 
award is regarded as final only after the student has enrolled. Students 
already in the school should make application not later than May 15 
lor grants to be used in the following school year. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

Loans are available through this fund after the first term in the 
school for students who are in need of financial aid. Applications are 
made to the Dean and are accepted at any time. However, students 
are encouraged to plan as far as possible in the Spring for the follow 
ing school year and to place applications by May 15. 

LOUISA WARDNER SCUDDER FUND 

Income from this fund is used for purposes of recreation or to fi- 
nance a needed rest or convalescence for one or more students. 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the school 
and in honor of Irene Sutliffe, the Director of the school from 1886 to 
1902, scholarship grants are available to graduates of the school for 
post-graduate study. They are granted primarily to alumnae who are 
qualifying for specific positions connected with the School of Nursing. 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

A few scholarships are available from these funds, primarily for 
graduate nurses. 



Health Service 



Because good health is of the utmost importance, the school main- 
tains a health service under the general direction of a committee of the 
faculty with a physician appointed to the staff of the school. Upon 
admission to the school a physical examination by the school physician 
and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray is required 
every six months, and a physical examination during each school year. 
A Schick test is performed on all students after admission to the school; 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 17 

immunization to diptheria is administered to those reacting positively. 
Mantoux tests will be given during the pre-clinical period and for 
those who are negative, will be repeated at regular intervals. In addi- 
tion, B. C. G. vaccine is provided to negative reactors. 

A well-equipped infirmary with necessary staff is maintained in the 
Nurses Residence. Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will 
be limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses, students will be cared for gratuitously in the 
Hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for first year 
students, and not more than four weeks at any one time for second and 
third year students. Minimal charges will be made if the stipulated 
allowance of infirmary or hospital care is exceeded. Expenses for special 
nursing care and special therapies must be borne by the student or 
her family. 

All students pay a health fee totaling $36.00 during the three years. 
This fee covers examinations, immunizations, and care in the hospital 
and infirmary, as referred to above. Only emergency surgery is included. 
This is defined as surgical procedures which, in the opinion of the 
school physician or a consulting surgeon of The New York Hospital 
staff, are necessary for the immediate welfare and safety of the student. 
The fee does not include surgery for the correction of chronic remedial 
defects. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a stu- 
dent's health makes it unwise for her to remain in the school, she may 
be required to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any 
time. 



Vacations and Absences 



A vacation of four weeks is given each year. Students entering with 
a baccalaureate degree, who have an exemption of time, are not granted 
a vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged to conform to 
the requirements of the educational program but usually fall within 
the Summer months. 

As a result of absences, the repetition of a course of study or special 
examinations may be required, class registration may be changed and 
nursing practice may have to be made up. 



Student Life and Activities 



RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence, a sixteen-story fireproof 
building adjacent to the Hospital. Every effort has been made in the 
construction and equipment of the residence to provide for the normal 
and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively fur- 
nished rooms, most of which are single. All rooms have running water 
and each of the eight student floors is equipped with ample baths, 
showers, and toilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room 
with adjoining kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the New York Public Library is located within a few blocks of the 
Hospital. 

In addition to the lounges for informal and formal use, a large audi- 
torium is located on the first floor of the residence. Sun roofs and a 
hobby room are also available for general use. Students who have had 
preparation in music are urged to keep up their interest and practice. 
Student activities planned jointly with the Cornell University Medical 
College are a regular part of the recreation and include glee club and 
dramatic productions. Programs are presented at intervals during the 
year. Students are hostesses at Open House on Sunday evenings when 
friends are welcomed to games, conversation, and refreshments. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach 
equipment and an outdoor grill are available through the House Com- 
mittee. 

18 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 19 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of representatives of those living in the residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for 
friends and relatives at a nominal charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless 
in music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Com- 
mittee, students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities 
as membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum 
of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The 
Blue Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships, the 
Christian Nurses' Fellowship and the Newman Club. Guest speakers 
and planned forums provide an opportunity for exchange of thought 
on many subjects. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule 
which is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all stu- 
dents. The Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, 
Judicial Council and Standing Committees. A Faculty Committee on 
Student Affairs acts in an advisory capacity to the student organization 
and, with the Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings 
which provide for informal discussions of school activities and prob- 
lems. 



RESIDENCE AND MARRIAGE 

All students are required to live in the Nurses Residence during 
their entire period in the school. This is considered an advantage to 
the student as a means of meeting the requirements of her program. 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one 
or more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater 
problem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course 
of study, freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature is 
highly desirable. For this reason, students are not expected to take 
on the additional responsibility of marriage during their period in 
the school, any exception to this being made on an individual basis in 
the third term of the last year. In the final term such permission may 
be granted when the student's record gives evidence that she is able 
to assume this added responsibility. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The school maintains active counseling services which are available 
at all times to any student who needs assistance, either in connection 
with routine matters that may come up in her normal work in the 
school or in connection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that 
those students who need help on questions of educational program, 
finances, health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to 
those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for 
any student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase 
of her life while in the School of Nursing. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national 
professional organization of nurses first known as the Nurses Associ- 
ated Alumnae of the United States and Canada, now the American 
Nurses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part 
of the Cornell University Alumni Association. 

One of the lounges of the residence is known as the Alumnae Room, 
and the alumnae meetings and many alumnae functions are held in 
this room. 



The Basic Nursing Program 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 10 and 11. 

Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry — (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology ( including laboratory ) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects 45 

Total (P re-Professional) 60 

PROFESSIONAL (3 years). In the School of Nursing. 

Semester Hours Credit 
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 

Orientation 

Physical Education 

Biological Science 7.5 

Biochemical Science 3 

Social Science 4 4 3.5 

Nutrition 2 1 

Pharmacology 2.5 

Nursing Arts 7.5 2 

Clinical Nursing 18 22 19 



Total {Professional) 44.5 27 24.5 96 

Grand Total (Required for BS. in Nursing) 156 

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of three calendar years, 
the full time being spent in residence at the School of Nursing. Each 
year is divided into three terms. In each clinical service related classes, 
conferences, and bedside instructions are given concurrently with 
practice and emphasis is placed on disease prevention and health in- 
struction. The student receives selected experiences in evening and 
night duty. An introduction to community nursing is provided 
through conferences and observation in various agencies assisting with 
health problems. The student participates in discussions centering 
around family health and assists in the referral of patients requiring 
nursing care after hospital discharge. An eight-week period of super- 
vised practice in family health service is provided through affiliation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. 

The school reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum as 
the need arises. The professional program of theory and experience 
follows. 

21 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FIRST YEAR 

The first twenty-five weeks are devoted primarily to class and labora- 
tory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the 
pavilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at Christmas 
time. During the last half of the year the student is assigned to the 
Departments of Medicine and Surgery for theory and practice in those 
clinical fields. The services in which she has experience include in 
addition to general medicine and general surgery, such specialties as 
ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology, and communicable disease. 
A vacation of three weeks is given in the last term. The following 
courses are taken: 

Num- Class * Weeks' Semester 

Course Title her Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Orientation 15 

Nursing Arts I 121 146 4.5 

Nursing Arts II 122 193 3 

Pharmacology I 124 15 0.5 

Pharmacology II 125 30 2 

Anatomy 100 60 2.5 

Physiology 101 45 2.5 

Biochemistry 102 60 3 

Microbiology 103 45 2 

Pathology 104 15 0.5 

Personality Growth and Development 110 15 1 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing Ill 30 2 

Professional Adjustments I 117 15 1 

Nutrition and Cookery 130 30 1 

Diet Therapy 131 30 1 

Medicine 140 32 2 

Communicable Diseases 141 13 1 

Principles of Medical Nursing (Including Com- 
municable Disease) 142 60 4 

Practice of Medical Nursing 143 12 3 

Surgery (Incl. specialties other than Urology) 150 30 2 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 151 45 3 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 152 12 3 

Physical Education 10 55 

Total 979 24 44.5 

•In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 



CURRICULUM 



23 



SECOND YEAR 

The three terms of the second year are devoted to classes and 
practice in the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development, the 
Woman's Clinic, and the Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Op- 
erating Room. There is a four-week vacation during the summer term. 

In the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development the stu- 
dent has an opportunity for experience in the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment, Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor, and the 
unit for older children. In the Woman's Clinic assignments for prac- 
tice include the Out-Patient Department, delivery floor, nursery, post- 
partum unit, and gynecologic division. During the period in the 
Departments of Medicine and Surgery experience is provided in Diet 
Therapy practice and in Communicable Disease nursing. Eight weeks 
are spent in the Operating Room. Courses are as follows: 



Num- Class * Weeks' Semester 

Course Title ber Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

History of Nursing 116 30 2 

Development of Behavior in Children , 171 30 2 

Pediatrics 170 15 1 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 172 60 4 

Practice of Pediatric Nursing 173 16 4 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 160 30 2 

Principles of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 161 45 3 

Practice of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 162 16 4 

Principles of Operating Room Nursing 156 15 1 

Practice of Operating Room Nursing 157 8 2 

Practice of Communicable Disease Nursing 144 4 1 

Practice of Diet Therapy 132 4 1 

Physical Education 10 32 

Total 257 48 27 

*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 



24 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

THIRD YEAR 

The three terms of the third year provide many interesting oppor- 
tunities and experiences. Sixteen weeks are spent in the Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic where the student gains a keen appreciation of the 
causes of mental and emotional illness as well as knowledge of the 
newer methods of therapy for their relief. 

An eight-week affiliation is provided with the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York, a family health agency. During this time the student 
has an opportunity, under supervision, to care for patients in their 
homes and to teach members of the family to give necessary care 
between visits of the nurse. Closely preceding or following this, there 
is a four-week period spent in the Medical-Surgical units of the Out- 
Patient Department, where non-hospitalized patients are treated. This 
is followed by four weeks in the private patient service. 

During one term of this last year, the senior returns once more to 
the Departments of Medicine and Surgery. Because of her increased 
knowledge and experience she is now ready to accept almost complete 
responsibility for analyzing and planning to meet the nursing needs 
of her patients. She receives instruction in planning the time and as- 
signments of staff personnel, and has senior charge duty for a period 
of approximately six weeks. There are four weeks of vacation during 
the summer term. Courses in the third year are: 

Num- Class Weeks' Semester 

Course Title her Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Psychiatry 180 30 2 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 181 60 4 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 182 *16 4 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 113 30 2 

Practice in Public Health Nursing 114 * 8 2 

Family and Community Health 112 20 

Professional Adjustments II 118 15 

Ward Activities and Relationships 119 15 

Practice of Out-Patient Nursing (M&S) 115 ** 4 

Practice in Care of Private Patients (M&S) 146 ** 4 

Principles of Urological Nursing 153 15 

Practice of Urological Nursing 154 * 4 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 155 * 4 

Practice of Medical Nursing 145 . ** 9 2 

Total 187 49 24.5 

Grand Total (Professional Program) 1,423 121 96 

*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 

**In addition to class hours instructed above, each practice period includes a minimum of two 
hours a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients for 
whom the student has some responsibility. 



e 



^mMH': w 




I 







Caring for the poliomyelitis patient, who is on a rocking bed to aid his breathing, 
is one of the many skills the student nurse learns. 




A student's life is not all work. The scene is one of the attractive single student 
rooms in the Nurses Residence. 



m 




A student observes and assists the doctor with an infusion as part of her supei 
vised practice in the care of the surgical patient. 



I 



Description of Courses 

(See requirements for promotion and graduation, pages 12-13.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. It is a major aim of this course to provide each 
student with the knowledge of good body mechanics in work and play. Through 
individual and group sports, she has the opportunity to become adept in the activity 
which she enjoys the most. A reasonable degree of skill in one or more sports is an 
important factor in the development of a happy recreational life for the individual. 
55 Hours, First Year; 32 Hours, Second Year. Miss McDERMOTT, Miss LYNCH. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information 
is included in the lectures. 
60 Hours. First Year. Dr. HINSEY, Dr. GEOHEGAN, Dr. BERRY. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course is directed toward an understanding of the prin- 
ciples involved in the functioning of the human body and the integration of its 
various systems. It is an essential prerequisite to the study of nursing arts, nutrition, 
and pathology. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

; | 45 Hours. First Year. Dr. PITTS, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER, Miss 
STOLL. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water balance, the digestion and metabolism of food, and the composition 
of blood, milk, and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and 
laboratory. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. du VIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GILDER, Miss 
CLYMER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE. 

104. PATHOLOGY. A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the student 
with the principles of general pathology and with the more common clinical labora- 
tory procedures. The pathologic changes associated with inflammation, neoplasm, 
and cardio-vascular disease are presented and illustrated by kodachromes, gross 
specimens, and microscopic slides. The techniques of routine urinalysis, blood 
grouping, RH determination, and blood transfusion are demonstrated. 

15 Hours. First Year. Dr. KELLNER. 

25 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PERSONALITY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. A presentation of the 
biological, sociological, and psychological factors which contribute to the formation 
of the adult personality. The various stages of personality development, psycho- 
logical responses to emotions, and emotional factors in physical illness are discussed. 
Particular emphasis is placed upon the nurse-patient relationship and the adjust- 
ment of the individual student to the nursing profession. 

15 Hours. First Year. Dr. SHERFEY. 

111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. Study of the patient as an 
individual, conditioned by psychological and cultural influences. Interrelationship 
of individual, family, and community health, and the work of the nurse in the 
promotion of health and the prevention of disease. Lectures, conferences, reports, 
excursions to community agencies. 

30 Hours. First Year. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Dr. SIMMONS, Miss SOULE. 

112. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. An introduction to the study of 
health problems and services in relation to the family and community. Considera- 
tion is given to the preparation of public health nurses and to the role of the nurse 
in the total health program. 

20 Hours. Third Year. Dr. SMILLIE, Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

113. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. A planned program 
of group conferences designed to acquaint the student with the functions . of a 
family health agency as part of a community health program, to familiarize her 
with the responsibilities of a field nurse in carrying out these functions, and to point 
out the way these functions and responsibilities demonstrate good public health 
nursing practice. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

114. PRACTICE IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Activities include health super- 
vision of infants, school and pre-school children, and adults; maternity nursing, 
morbidity nursing in the home. Through carefully graded observation, individual 
conferences, case conference, and supervised practice, the student is given increasing 
responsibility for health work with a small, selected group of families. This exper- 
ience is by affiliation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, which provides 
a generalized public health nursing service including bedside care of the sick in their 
homes. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

115. PRACTICE IN OUT-PATIENT NURSING. Experience in selected clinics of 
the Medical and Surgical services; there are related family studies, conferences with 
members of the Social Service Department, visits to community agencies. 

4 Weeks. Third Year. Head of Department of Out-Patient Nursing, Miss 
McMULLAN, and staff. 

116. HISTORY OF NURSING. In this course the international development of 
nursing is traced from its earliest forms to its present status. The influence of an 
ever-changing society upon nursing education is emphasized. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Miss MacLEAN. 

117. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS I. Consideration of the philosophical and 
ethical foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. 
Problems related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours. First Year. Miss LYONS. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 27 

118. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS II. A survey of the nursing field, particu- 
larly the place of the professional organizations, legislation affecting nursing, 
economics of medical and nursing care, the role of the practical nurse, placement 
and counseling agencies, periodicals and international aspects of nursing. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, Miss PARKER and special lecturers. 

119. WARD ACTIVITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS. Consideration is given to the 
basic principles which underlie effective working relationships with professional 
and non-professional personnel. The student is also guided in recognizing and plan- 
ning for the use of learning situations as they relate to patients or younger students, 
and she is introduced to the activities which she will undertake when assigned 
to senior charge duty. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss HARMON, Miss FREDERICK, Miss BRESNAHAN, 
Miss LYONS. 

NURSING AND ALLIED ARTS — GENERAL 

120. ORIENTATION. This course gives the beginning student a general concept 
of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the individual 
who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical and 
mental health of the nurse as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in 
her work. 

12 Hours, First Year; iy 2 Hour, Second Year; 1% Hour, Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, 
Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, Dr. HAYES. 

121. NURSING ARTS I. This course is designed to give the student an understand- 
ing of the basic physical needs of individuals and of how these may be met best in 
relation to the nursing care of a patient. There is emphasis upon desirable nurse- 
patient relationships, and instruction is given in the simpler nursing procedures. 
Practice includes the application of basic principles of nursing in the Nursing Arts 
Laboratory, and in the care of convalescent patients on the pavilions of the Hospital. 
146 Hours. First Year. Miss MacLEAN, Mrs. WANG and assistants. 

! 122. NURSING ARTS II. A course designed to give the student an understanding 
of advanced nursing principles and procedures, and to assist in the development 
and perfection of skills. It is correlated with lectures on the medical and surgical 
aspects of disease, and with instruction in nursing care pertinent to these conditions. 
Practice includes application of advanced nursing principles and procedures in the 
Nursing Arts Laboratory, and in the care of patients on the pavilions of the 
Hospital. There is opportunity for observation of nursing in the Out-Patient 
Department and for a brief experience in the Central Sterile Supply Department. 
193 Hours. First Year. Miss MacLEAN, Mrs. WANG and assistants. 

124. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems 
used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calculating 
dosages. It stresses the nurse's responsibility in the administration of medicines. 
15 Hours. First Year. Miss McCLUSKEY. 

125. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse 
in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and com- 
monly used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administra- 
tion, indiosyncrasies, and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the accurate ad- 
ministration of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours. First Year. Nurse Instructor. 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION AND COOKERY. A basic course in normal adult nutrition and 
in food preparation. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are 
discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services in the 
second year.) 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER. 

131. DIET THERAPY. A course designed to present the underlying principles in 
the treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given concurrently with the 
lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. This course is supplemented by confer- 
ence work during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER. 

132. PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY. The application of the principles of diet 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the Hos- 
pital and in the Nutrition Clinic. 

4 Weeks, Second Year; 2 Weeks, Third Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYN- 
BERGEN, Miss CLYMER, Miss TILLOTSON, Miss FARGO, Miss RICHMOND. 



MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize, and interpret required read- 
ing covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

32 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

141. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. A study of communicable diseases, including 
tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

13 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE 
DISEASE NURSING. The principles and methods of nursing care for patients with 
medical, neurogical, and communicable disease are considered. 

60 Hours. First Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES. 

143. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL 
NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of medical nursing 
principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical and neurological 
pavilions of the Hospital. 

8 Weeks. First Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Mrs. 
BROCKMAN, Miss STIRLING, Miss PLACE. 

144. PRACTICE OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE NURSING. Two experiences of 
four weeks each are given in which students study and practice medical aseptic 
technique and nursing as related to the care of patients suffering from communi- 
cable diseases, including tuberculosis. 

8 Weeks. First and Second Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, 
Miss PLACE, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss STIRLING. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 29 

145. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING. During the senior year students have 
I opportunity to apply their knowledge and skill to the care of patients with complex 
ii nursing needs. Care of patients through the evening and night hours may be 

included. An overview of the managerial aspects of a clinical unit is given with pro- 
vision for supervised practice. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Miss 
PLACE, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss STIRLING. 

146. PRACTICE IN CARE OF PRIVATE AND SEMI-PRIVATE PATIENTS. 
This experience offers an opportunity for the student to become aware of the 
needs of patients with a wide variety of socio-economic backgrounds. By means 
of supervised practice, the student also gains an appreciation of the varied methods 
of treating patients with the same diagnosis. 

4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss POOR, Miss NIELSEN, and staff. 



SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Conditions which require surgery are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. The factors which determine the need for surgical interference and the 
type of operations best suited to the condition are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon 
observations which should be made by the nurse both preceding and following 
operation. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. GLENN and staff. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. By the method of lecture and dem- 
onstration, the students are taught principles of surgical nursing. This includes the 
principles of surgical asepsis and the nursing care of patients with general surgical 
as well as specialized surgical conditions. 

45 Hours. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER. Miss DERICKS, Miss SWAN- 
WICK, Miss DANIELS, Mrs. GINSBERG. 

152. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. This includes study and supervised 
practice in the application of nursing principles to the care of patients on certain 
of the general and specialized surgical services of the Hospital. The student is 
guided in gaining a concept of the preventive as well as the therapeutic responsibili- 
ties of the nurse. 

12 Weeks. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss FEDDER, Miss DERICKS, 
Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss DANIELS, Miss CONGRAVE. 

153. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. This course is planned to give 
the student a knowledge of the diseases and anomalies of the genito-urinary tract, 
and the principles underlying the care of patients with these conditions. Prepara- 
tion of the patient for self-care on discharge is stressed. Lectures, conferences, 
and demonstrations. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss SWANWICK, Dr. MARSHALL, and staff. 

154. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Opportunity is provided for the 
development of understanding and skill in meeting the special nursing needs of 
patients with urological conditions. Preparations for self-cure on discharge is 
stressed. 

4 weeks. Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss SWANWICK, Miss SABIA, 
Miss CONGRAVE. 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

155. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. In the third year the student is given 
more responsibility for analyzing and meeting the nursing needs of patients, in- 
cluding preparation for self-care after discharge from the Hospital. In addition she 
has an opportunity to assist with some of the managerial problems on the pavilions. 
4 weeks. Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss FEDDER, Miss DERICKS, 
Miss SWANWICK, Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss CONGRAVE. 

156. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, dis- 
cussions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods 
of aseptic technique in relation to care of patients at the time of operation. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Miss CARBERY, Miss TUFFLEY, Miss DeLELYS. 

157. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Supervised clinical ex 
perience and study of the application of nursing principles to the care of patients in 
the Operating Room. Students are given the opportunity to observe and assist 
with operative procedures, to relate this experience to the total care of surgical 
patients and to gain an appreciation of the qualities and abilities essential to 
effective nursing in this field. 

8 Weeks. Second Year. Miss CARBERY, Miss TUFFLEY, Miss DeLELYS, and staff. 

OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING 

160. OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. This course deals with the clinical, ana- 
tomical, physiological, and pathological aspects of pregnancy, labor, and the puer- 
perium, as well as of the female generative organs. Consideration is given to the 
psychosomatic approach in the prevention of complications, family-sociologic re- 
lationships in child bearing, the nature, development, and adjustment of the 
newborn. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Medical staff of the Woman's Clinic. 

161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. This 
course emphasizes the importance of antepartal observation and instruction, nutri- 
tional needs, infant care, obstetric and gynecologic procedures, current modes and 
trends in therapy, including the series of exercises for preparation for labor (Natural 
Childbirth) and the application of this method to patient care. 

45 Hours. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss COLETTI, Miss 
DUSTAN, Mrs. GILPATRICK, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, Mrs. MIGUEL, Mrs. 
BAILEY, and Miss RYNBERGEN and staff. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Students ob- 
serve and care for infants, obstetric and gynecologic patients under supervision in 
the pavilions, nurseries, labor, and delivery rooms, and Out-Patient Department. 
Nursing care studies, conferences, and field trips are supplementary features of the 
course. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss DUSTAN, Miss 
JUMP, Miss BOYLE. Miss COLETTI, Mrs. MIGUEL, Mrs. BAILEY, Mrs. 
GILPATRICK. 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 

infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and 

disease. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Dr. LEVINE and staff. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

171. DEVELOPMENT OF BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN. A study of the normal 
child and his behavior in relation to his growth and needs from infancy to adult- 
hood. 

I 30 Hours. Second Year. Dr. MERCER. 

172. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the 
application of knowledge and understanding of ways of meeting the child's needs 
in health and during illness; the basic principles in nursing of children and the 
effects of illness on the child and his family. Lectures, case presentations and 
panel discussions. 

60 Hours. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, Miss 
WOODFALL, Miss RYNBERGEN, and staff. 

173. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the ap- 
plication of knowledge to the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, 

I and children in the Out-Patient Department and Nursery School. Group con- 
ferences, demonstrations, and nursing care plans. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, 
Miss WOODFALL, Miss DON DERO, Miss KIERNAN, Miss SIMMONS, Miss 
TERRY, Miss PEARSON, and staff. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the path- 
ology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. The problems frequently encountered 
in infancy, childhood, adolescence, the aging period and senility are discussed. An 
historical survey of the development of psychiatry and the mental hygiene move- 
ment is offered, as well as an introduction to the techniques and social agencies con- 
cerned with helping people meet their problems. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. 

181. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The purpose of this course 
is to help the student gain an understanding of the basic principles in the nursing 
care of patients with personality disorders and the nursing techniques utilized 
in their treatment. Field trips are planned to acquaint the student with some of the 
community facilities which are devoted to rehabilitation, as well as prevention 
and treatment of psychiatric illnesses. Psychiatric social service and out-patient 
psychiatric services are included in the student's community experience. The total 
program is oriented toward guiding the student in the development of an objective 
attitude toward emotional disorders, and a broader appreciation of the inter- 
relationships between environmental, somatic, and constitutional factors as they 
influence mental health. 

60 Hours. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss ZIERING, Miss SANTOS, Miss 
MUHS, Miss PAIGE, Mrs. SIMON and staff. 

182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course consists of supervised 
experience in the observation and care of emotionally ill adult and adolescent 
patients during the acute phase of illness, as well as during convalescence. Students 
have an opportunity to participate in many of the currently approved forms of 
psychiatric treatment. These include the following therapies: occupational, recre- 
ational, physical, insulin, electro-convulsive, as well as psychotherapy, in each of 
which there is particular emphasis on the special need of the individual patient. 

16 Weeks. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss ZIERING, Miss SANTOS, Miss MUHS, 
Miss SPARGO, Miss NEWBURG, Miss PAIGE, and staff. 



Administration 



JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD OF 
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE HOSPITAL 



Board of Trustees 

of 
Cornell University 



Neal Dow Becker, Chairman, Board of 

Trustees 
Arthur H. Dean 
Cornelis W. de Kiewiet, Acting 

President of the University 

William Harding Jackson Board of Governors of 
Henry S. Sturgis, Treasurer > The Society of 

John Hay Whitney, President J the New York Hospital 

John W. Davis 



Stanhope Bayne-Jones, President 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



•"■" ———"-—--j — .— ... ..- — q - — -_, — — - — - j 

on A. Wade 1 m , _ „ rT . 

> Trustees of Lornelt university 

} 



C. W. de Kiewiet, Chairman Acting President of Cornell University 

Preston 

Ruth 

Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr.... Governors of the Society of 

Langdon P. Marvin J The New York Hospital 

David P. Barr President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones President, Joint Administrative Board 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-large 

Helen Daum Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

Joseph C. Hinsey Dean of the Cornell University Medical College 

Henry N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York 

Wilson G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive 

Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 

Elizabeth Lee Vincent Dean of the State College of Home 

Economics, Cornell University 

32 







ADMINISTRATION 33 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Cornelis W. de Kiewiet, Ph.D. Acting President of the University 
Stanhope Bayne-Jones, M.D. ... President, Joint Administrative Board 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N. Dean 

Bessie A. Parker, B.S., R.N. Associate Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Assistant Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A. Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Claire Calhoun, M.A. Assistant Director of the Residence 

Rheta B. Glueck Assistant in Public Relations 

Mrs. Helene Jamieson Jordan Special Assistant in Public Relations 
'Georgia Saylor, B.A., B.S. in l.s. Librarian 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Poor, Secretary 

i Dr. Barr Miss Hickcox Miss Lyons Miss Schubert 

Dr. Bayne-Jones Dr. Hinsey Mrs. Overholser Miss Tuffley 

Miss Carrington Miss Klein Miss Parker Mrs. Wright 

Miss Fritz 

CHAIRMEN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss Harmon Records Miss Walters 

Curriculum Miss Lyons Student Affairs Miss Frederick 

Library Miss Lyons Scholarships Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: First Yr Miss Rynbergen 

Second Yr Miss Woodfall Third Yr Miss Swanwick 

Student and Staff Health Mrs. Overholser 

Affiliating Students Miss Ferguson 

Programs for Graduate Nurses Miss Newton 

Principles and Practices of Nursing Miss MacLean 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Office of Dean of Men, Dean of Women Mrs. Maria Brown, 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

College of Home Economics Jean Failing, Associate 

Professor of Home Economics, Student Counselor 

College of Arts and Sciences H. R. Smart, Associate 

Professor of Philosophy, Assistant to the Dean 

College of Agriculture H. S. Tyler, Professor in 

Personnel Administration 
Office of Admissions Robert Storandt, Associate Director 



Faculty 



C. W. de Kiewiet, Ph.D., Acting President of the University 
Edmund Ezra Day, Ph.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Dean of the School of 
Nursing, Director of the Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1930. Diploma, Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International 
Foundation, London, England, 1936.) 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor of Nursijig, Associate Dean of the School 
of Nursing, Associate Director of the Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Rhode 
Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 1918; B.S., Columbia University, 1937.) 

Leo W. Simmons, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Anthropology in Nursing. (B.A., 
Bethany College, W. Va., 1923; B.D., Yale University, 1925; M.A., 1927; Ph.D., 1931.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing, Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and School of 
Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean, Associate Professor of Nursing. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N. Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing, 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 
1944.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N. Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing, Head of 

Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in 

Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia 
University, 1932.) 

Elizabeth U. Wright, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Director of Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mass- 
achusetts General Hospital, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 1948.) 

34 



FACULTY 35 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

*Muriel Carbery, A.B., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing, Head of 

Operating Room Nursing Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, 

New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 

Bernice Carrington, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Assistant Director, 

Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New Haven Hospital School of Nursing, 

1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1932; M.A., 1950.) 

Edna Fritz, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Nursing, Head of the Medical 

Nursing Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Russell Sage College School of Nursing, 1940; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing, Head of 

Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 

Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936.) 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director, 
Nurses Residence. (Diploma, Bouve-Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; B.S., 
New York University, 1930; M.A., 1932.) 

Kathleen Newton, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Administrative 
Assistant for Staff Education. (B.S., University of Washington, 1934; Diploma in 
Nursing, University of Washington School of Nursing, 1936; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1949.) 

M. Eva Poor, A.B., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of Private Patient 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1939.) 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons College, 
1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical College, 1938.) 



Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B., University of Illinois, 1920; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1926.) 

FACULTY INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient 
Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1945.) 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing, Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939; B.S., 
1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Dorothy Grace Clymer, B.S., Faculty Instructor in Science. (B.S., Pennsylvania 
State College, 1943.) 

Angela Coletti, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Newborn Nurseries. (Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Long Island City Hospital 
School of Nursing, Long Island City, N. Y.; 1942; B.S., St. John's University, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945; M.A., New York University, 1948.) 

Virginia Daniels, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1948.) 



* Leave of absence for study, 1950-1951. 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Su- 
pervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School 
of Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Laura C. Dustan, M.N., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (B.S., University 
of Vermont, 1940; M.N., Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Western Reserve 
University, 1943; Midwifery Certificate, Maternity Center Association, N. Y. C, 1946.) 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942.) 

Sarah M. Ferguson, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital 
School of Nursing, Boston, Mass., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Mildred Gilpatrick, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor, Woman's Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Philadelphia General 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Lilian Henderson Ginsberg, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; 
Supervisor in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University 
School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1945.) 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant 
Head of Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 1928; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night 
Supervisor in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas 
School of Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor 
in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Anne Hughes, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursi?ig; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1943; B.S., Cornell University, 1943.) 

Dorothy E. Jump, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor, Delivery Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henry 
Ford Hospital School of Nursing, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, 1943.) 

H. Rosalind MacLean, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Nursing Arts. (B.A., Adel- 
phi College, 1932; M.A., Columbia University, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 

Audrey McCluskey, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor 
in Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1948.) 

Dorothy McMullan, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nurs- 
ing; Supervisor, Out-Patient Medical and Surgical Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., New York University, 1948; 
M.A., 1950.) 



FACULTY 37 

Eleanor Muhs, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of 
Nursing, Rochester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948.) 

Edith Nielsen, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; 
Supervisor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Lucille Notter, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Public Health Nursing; Assistant 
Director of Education, Visiting Nurse Service of New York City. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing, Louisville, Ky., 1931; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1941; M.A., 1946.) 

Edith V. Olson, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Operating Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Kings County Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1943; B.S., Hunter College, 1949.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 

Elvin Santos, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Duke University School of Nurs- 
ing, 1943; B.S., Catholic University of America, 1945.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

Mary H. Swanwick, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor 
in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York City, 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

Ethel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Super- 
visor in Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1944; Diploma 
in Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Acting Head of 
Operating Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School 
of Nursing, Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1949.) 

Jeannette Walters, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Assistant Department Head, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., 
New York University, 1944; M.A., 1949.) 

Mamie Wang, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Peiping Medical College School of Nursing, Peiping, China, 1938; B.S., Yenching 
University, 1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1943.) 

Ruth Woodfall, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Boston, Mass., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Hannah Ziering, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Admin- 
istrative Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Long Island University, 1940; 
Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1943; B.S., Cornell University, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1945.) 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D. Dean and Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D. Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D. Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D. Professor of Psychiatry 

Robert F. Pitts, M.D. Professor of Physiology 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Ph.D. Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D. Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D. Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D. Professor of Pediatrics 

James M. Neill, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D. Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Robert P. Ball, M.D. Professor of Radiology 

Gordon R. Douglas, M.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Charles Berry, M.D. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

William A. Geohegan, M.D. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Helena Gilder, M.D. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Alice M. Stoll, M.S. Research and Teaching Assistant in Physiology 

Martha J. Barrett, M.A. Research and Teaching Assistant in Physiology 

To be appointed Assistant in Biochemistry 



Associated with the Faculty 

assistants in instruction 

Mary Bailey, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (B.S., Brooklyn College, 
1936; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945.) 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor in 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1931.) 

Constance Congrave, B.A., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Night 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stanford University 
School of Nursing, 1944; B.A., Stanford University, 1944.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital School of 
Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941.) 

Leone Marjorie DeLelys, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Operating Room Nursing; Assist- 
ant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms. (Diploma in Nursing, Strong Memorial 
Hospital School of Nursing, Rochester, N. Y., 1937; B.S., Columbia University, 
1944.) 

Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing; Supervisor, Nurses' Health 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New York 
City, 1920.) 



ASSOCIATED WITH FACULTY 39 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., 1935.) 

Louise Hazeltine, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., Cornell 
University, 1949.) -\. ^jl&_X. 

Martha E. Jackson, Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night Assistant 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Philadelphia General Hospital, 1937.) 

Eileen Kiernan, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in Pediatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1944.) 

Mary P. Lynch, B.S., Assistant in Physical Education. (B.S., Bouve-Boston School of 
Physical Education, affiliated with Tufts College, 1950.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Johnston Hospital 
School, of Nursing, Manila, P. L, 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) 

Doris Place, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Cornell University, 1942; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Faxton Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor in Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School 
of Nursing, Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947.) 

Charlotte Stirling, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor, 
■ Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New England Hospital for Women 
and Children, Boston, Mass., 1940; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

Margaret Terry, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 
School of Nursing, Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

Jessie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1924.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 
Waverly, Mass., 1933.) 

Lucille Wright, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1945; B.S., University of Colorado, 1950.) 

LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell Medical College 



Voi 



40 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D. Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N. Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N. Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N. Evening Administrative Assistant 

Doris F. Bresnahan, B.S., R.N. Day Administrative Assistant 

In Charge of Auxiliary Staff 

Tiielma Cobb, R.N. Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Marjorie Agnew, B.S., R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lois Cantrell, B.S., R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Claire Meyerowitz, B.S., R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Margaret DeWitt, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lucy Hickey, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 



Carman, Edna 
Collins, Ona, B.S. 

Aron, Katherine 
Cullington, Barbara 
Dieterle, Doris 
Gleeson, Helen 



Bosco, Antoinette 
Brooks, Alice 
Cooke, C. Eloise 
Derr, Barbara 
Farmer, Rosemary 
Gotwald, Mary, B.S. 



Beaty, Lillian 
Bott, Alma 
Calder, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Colwell, Anna 
Connor, Agnes 
Ferrara, Lucia 



Carmody, Eileen, B.S. 
Clark, Evelyn 
DeWitt, Frances, A.B. 
Kinstler, Shirley 



HEAD NURSES 

MEDICINE 
Curtis, Jane, B.S. 
Hiscox, Kathryn, B.S. 

SURGERY 
Guild, Charlotte, B.S. 
Johnsen, Delores 
Lubowska, Nina 
McKeown, Elizabeth 

OPERATING ROOM 

Husted, Sally 
Karstetter, Cora 
Knudsen, Margharethe 
Milone, Marion 
Myers, Helen 
Philbrick, Olive 






Joslvn, Joyce, B.S. 



Pruchnik, Blanche 
Ripepi, Rosemary 
Young, Eleanor 



Rau, Rosalie, B.A. 
Rectanus, Dorothy 
Skoog, Alverna 
Torpey, Teresa 
Ward, Alberta 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Gibson, Elva, B.S. 

Hawtin, Clara 

Jackson, Dorothy 

Knox, Violet 

Manning, Constance, B.S., M.A. 

Mathews, Thelma 



Matus, Veronica 
Philla, Dorothy 
Skinner, Margaret, B.A. 
Story, Mildred, B.S. 
Young, Kathleen 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Lambert, Lucille Rigg s > Elise, A.B. 



Liddle, Evelyn 
Long, Ilene 
Meachard, Delia 
Nussbaumer, Elsa 



Rouchleau, Margaret 
Wigsten, Mary 
Willett, Marion, B.S. 



ASSOCIATED WITH FACULTY 



41 



leideman,, Edith, B.S. 
Cnapp, Dorothy 
Cozitzky, Mary 



Anderson, Marie 
jhormley, Josephine, B.S. 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 

Learn, Ruth 
Loughney, Eileen 
Pavy, Coy, B.A. 

PEDIATRICS 

Harte, Rosemary, B.S. 
Hurwitz, Flora 
Johnson, Nancy, B.S. 



Rasely, Elizabeth 
Rose, Lefa 
Smith, Helen 



Semanision, Helen 
Zemlock, Margaret 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 



^ubel, Helen, B.S. 
lampbell, Marjorie 
rany, Eleanor, B.S. 
ry, Meredith 



Gebhart, Mary, B.S. 
Goodman, Gertrude, B.S. 
Lundgren, Grace 
McK.ee, Beatrice 



Mellady, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Morrison, Esther 
Podereskey, Arlene 
Smith, Jane, B.S. 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 



Louise Stephenson, B.S., M.S., Director 
Vnne Butera, B.S. Susan Paige, B.S. 

ane Fargo, B.S., M.A. Virginia Pearson, B.S. 

vIeredith Jones, B.S. Elizabeth Richmond, B.S., M.A. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Jeanne Tillotson, B.S. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

VIildred Sfargo Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A. Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel Director, Woman's Clinic 

VIelly Simon Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

DIVISION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 
IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 

leanor Reich Consultant, Nursery School 

ileanor Blumgart Director, Nursery School 

[ane Varian Teacher, Nursery School 

velyn Wolff Occupational Therapy 

STAFF OF THE VISITING NURSE SERVICE 

VIarian Randall, B.S., R.N. Director 

and Staff 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Fheressa Sanman, B.S., R.N., '25. ... 



President 



COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

vIrs. Maurice Tingley Chairman 



Students in the School* 



Name Class Home 

Affleck, May '50 Larchmont, N. Y. 

Alexander, Inge '52 New York, N. Y. 

Archilla, Carmen '50 Mayagues, Puerto Rico 

Barrus, Jean Marilyn '52 Piermont, N. Y. 

Benjamin, Betty J. '51 Jersey City, N. J. 

Berg, Helen M. '51 Floral Park, N. Y. 

Birdsall, Elizabeth Ann '52 Mount Hermon, Mass. 

Blinn, Carolyn Mae '52 Newtown, Pa. 

Boynton, Nancy Theresa '50 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Briggs, Phyllis '50 Hampton, Iowa 

Burrage, Margaret G '52 White Plains, N. Y. 

Campell, Susan G '51 Chicago, 111. 

Caruso, Marie D '52 Mechanicville, N. Y. 

Cecil, Helen Elizabeth '52 Hot Springs, Ark. 

Ceritelli, Louise Marion '52 New York, N. Y. 

Coates, Margaret E '51 Plainfield, N. J. 

Conner, Barbara Ann '50 Saco, Maine 

Conway, Ronnie '51 East Hampton, N. Y. 

Cook, Victoria M '50 Chicago, 111. 

Cooper, Ruth Kemper '50 Cincinnati, Ohio 

Courtright, Nancy Marie '52 River Edge, N. J. 

Coviello, Carolyn '51 Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Cowles, Marilyn M. '50 Corning, N. Y. 

Crew, Elizabeth Ann '52 New York, N. Y. 

Cross, Laura Ann B. '52 Fayetteville, N. Y. 

Davenport, Joan '52 Amherst, Mass. 

DelcofT, Gloria Jean '52 Cincinnati, Ohio 

Devine, Patricia M '52 New York, N. Y. 

Dobson, Betty Lou '52 Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Dorn, Ruth Elizabeth '52 Souderton, Pa. 

Dulin, Jean '51 Fly Creek, N. Y. 

Duncan, Alice E '50 Arlington, Va. 

DuPeza, Elizabeth Ida '52 Patchogue, N. Y. 

Duvall, Grace '50 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dye, Julianne '51 Rochester, N. Y. 

Elliot, F. Eileen '51 Tenafly, N. J. 

Emerson, Charlene Graham '52 Wakefield, Mass. 

Emerson, Faith G '50 Bridgeton, N. J. 

Ernest, Ruth '51 Bath, Pa. 

Evans, Jane B. '52 Penn Valley, Pa. 

Farrell, Jean Emily '52 Roselle, N. J. 

Feitner, Betty '51 Montclair, N. J. 

Ford, Jean Gretchen '51 Newtown, N. J. 

Forney, Anne Johnson '52 Westport, Conn. 



From 

Wheaton College 

Hunter College 

Polytechnic Institute, San 
German, Puerto Rico 

New York University 

Connecticut College for 
Women 

Bucknell University 

University of Massachu- 
setts 

State Teachers College, 
East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Syracuse University 

Cornell College 

Elmira College 

Oberlin College 

Russell Sage College 

Washington University 

Hunter College 

Wilson College 

University of New Hamp- 
shire 

Elmira College 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

University of Cincinnati 

Tennessee Wesleyan Jun- 
ior College 

Good Counsel College 

Elmira College 

Hunter College 

Syracuse University 

Goucher College 

University of Cincinnati 

Hunter College 

Packer Collegiate Institute 

Temple University 

Cornell University 

George Washington Uni- 
versity 

Hofstra College 

Brooklyn College 

Stephens College 

Keuka College 

Centenary Junior College 

Ursinus College 

Temple University 

Colby Junior College 

Mt. St. Agnes College 

Green Mt. Junior College 

Elmira College 

University of North Car- 
olina 



* Including those graduating in September, 1950, but not those entering at that time. 

42 



STUDENTS 

Same Class Home 

franklin, Shirley Irene '50 Oxford, N. Y. 

Gallert, Anna Mae '51 Deepwater, N.J. 



43 



Gault, Nancy Cox '50 

Gerhold, Vivian '51 

Gersoni, Carolyn '52 

Gibson, Mary Elizabeth H. '52 
oheen, Ruth Martin '50 

Goldman, Lillian '52 

Goldstein, Marilyn Joyce .'52 
Goostray, Jane Anne '52 

Gorenflo, Jo Anne R '51 

Gregory, Ellen Louise '50 



Brookline, Mass. 
Sidney, Ohio 
Colliersville, N. Y. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Pine Plains, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Watertown, Mass. 
Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 
Chevy Chase, Md. 



Greisen, Claire Anne '52 Elmsford, N. Y. 

Grinwis, Helen Mae '52 Clifton, N. J. 

Gritzke, Lois Katherine '52 Buffalo, N. Y. 



Gurskey, Nancy Anne '50 

Hadley, Jeanne '50 

Hale, Dorothy '51 

f Haley, Madeline '51 

Hamill, Evelyn Agnes '52 

;Hatch, Joan Carolyn '52 

Henderson, Jane '51 

Ho, Edna Yuk Lin '52 

Holden, Susanne T. '51 

Houston, Jean M. '50 

Hrouda, Margery E. '50 

Hubbard, Nancy Kathleen '52 

Jeck, Eileen McLellan '50 

Johnson, Marie G. '52 

Jones, Catharine B. '52 

Jordan, Mary Elizabeth '52 

Keagle, Marion Nancy '52 

Kelly, Mary Grace '50 

(jnl Knowlton, Ann Witherbee..'52 

Kornegay, Elva Alice '52 

Kozma, Constance '51 

Kurihara, Marie '50 

Lagerquist, Elaine '51 

Lee, Carol '51 

'■ McCabe, Ellin Jeanne '50 

McCarty, Joan '51 

McCormack, Jean Clair .52 

McKaig, Doris Marguerite .'52 

McKeown, Anne M. '51 

McKinley, Barbara Anne. ..'50 

Manning, Helen Louise '52 

Martin, Mary Chandler '52 

Mason, Joyce Towne '50 

Mohr, Wanda Katherine. ...'52 
Mulherin, Virginia Ann '52 
Miller, Phyllis M. *51 



Allentown, Pa. 
Ocean City, N. J. 
Portland, Conn. 
Chicago, 111. 
New York, N. Y. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
East Orange, N. J. 
Honolulu, Hawaii 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 
Peekskill, N. Y. 

Boston, Mass. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Farmington, Me. 
Richmond, Ind. 
South China, Me. 
Olean, N. Y. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Seven Springs, N. C. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Watertown, Conn. 
Baldwin, N. Y. 
Harrison, N. Y. 
New Philadelphia, O. 
Bayonne, N. J. 
Jordan, N. Y. 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Cos Cob, Conn. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jackson, Minn. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Lancaster, Pa. 



From 



New Jersey College for 

Women 
Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 
University of Chicago 
Cornell University 
Brooklyn College 
Bennington College 
Cornell University 
Hunter College 
University of Connecticut 
Simmons College 
University of Michigan 
George Washington Uni- 
versity 
Good Counsel College 
New Jersey College for 

Women 
Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 
Cedar Crest College 
Cornell University 
Colby Junior College 
University of Illinois 
Fordham University 
William Smith College 
Ripon College 
University of Hawaii 
College of St. Elizabeth 
Cornell University 
Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 
University of Maine 
Mt. Holyoke College 
University of Maine 
Swarthmore College 
University of Maine 
Westminster College 
Elmira College 
College of St. Theresa 
Wake Forest College 
Furman University 
University of California 
Russell Sage College 
Cornell University 
Green Mt. Junior College 
Ohio University 
College of New Rochelle 
Elmira College 
Hunter College 
University of Connecticut 
Wilson College 
Duke University 
Brooklyn College 
Macalester College 
Marywood College 
Cedar Crest College 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Class Home 

Nein, Janet Louise '52 Westfield, N. J. 

Nolt, Edith '50 Landisville, Pa. 

Noone, Eileen '50 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Palmer, Margaret M. '50 Tully, N. Y. 

Pollens, Janet '52 New York, N. Y. 

Pulley, Eleanor Martha '52 Westfield, N. J. 

Reif, Lillian Hughston '52 Spartanburg, S. C. 

Riker, Joan '51 Plandome, N. Y. 

Saltzman, Miriam '50 New York, N. Y. 

Sarno, Phyllis '50 New York, N. Y. 

Sater, Anita '52 Long Island City, N. Y. 

Savage, Patricia '52 Randolph, Vt. 

Schlitt, Merylin Anne '52 Darien, Conn. 

Schmitz, Anna '51 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Schultz, Alma E. '51 Washington, D. C. 

Schultz, Arlene Lois '52 New York, N. Y. 

Seiler, Elizabeth '51 Glen Ridge. N. J. 

Sheldon, Alice Louise '52 Kingston, N. Y. 

Sieber, Alice L. '51 Frederic, Wis. 

Sifry, Rhoda '51 New York, N. Y. 

Simmons, Patricia Marie '52 Bucksport, Me. 

Skidmore, Sally Louise '52 Staten Island, N. Y. 

Steel, Emmajean '52 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Stern, Caryl Jean '52 Manhasset, N. Y. 

Storandt, Jo Ellen '51 Middletown, Conn. 

Stover, Virginia '51 Erwinna, Pa. 

Strouse, Nancy Jane '50 Irvington, N. J. 

Sturgis, Lillian Eloise '50 Ocala, Fla. 

Svendsen, Elsie '51 Bellrose, N. Y. 

Swann, Jean '50 Elmira, N. Y. 

Swanwick, Joan E. '50 Devon, Conn. 

Sweeney, Claire Louise '51 Middletown, N. Y. 

Tagliabue, Alma E. '50 Bayville, N. Y. 

Tease, Jean Wilson '50 Rushland, Pa. 

Thorn, Elizabeth P. '52 Princeton, N. J. 

Thompson, Jean E. '52 Elmira, N. Y. 

Toris, Beatrice J. '52 New York, N. Y. 

Tynan, Eleanor Mary '52 Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Vander, Evelyn M. '52 New York, N. Y. 

Vervaet, Barbara Conroy ...'50 Rutherford, N. J. 

Yon Thurn, Louise '50 Belmont, Mass. 

Weller, Martha Louise '52 Bronxville, N. Y. 

Whittemore, Patricia '52 Portland, Me. 

Wilson, Nancy '52 Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Wilson, Patience '51 Rowayton, Conn. 

Wohlberg, Ilene Myrle '52 Teaneck, N. J. 

Woodlock, Marion E. '52 New York, N. Y. 

Yelverton, M. Rebecca '50 Raleigh, N. C. 



From 

Pembroke College 

Temple University 

St. John's University 

Cornell University 

Hunter College 

Russell Sage College 

Limestone College 

Marymount College 

Queens College 

University of Missouri 

Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 

Russell Sage College 

Mt. St. Agnes College 

Concordia Collegiate Inst. 

Russell Sage College 

Brooklyn College 

Green Mt. Junior College 

Bethany College 

Macalester College 

Hunter College 

University of Maine 

Cornell University 

Cornell University 

Elmira College 

Macalester College 

University of North Caro- 
lina 

Centenary Junior College 

Duke University 

Luther College 

Augustana College 

Ohio University 

Cornell University 

Rensselaer Polytechnic In- 
stitute 

Temple University 

New Jersey College for 
for Women 

Elmira College 

Hunter College 

Western College for 
Women 

New York University 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Middlebury College 

Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 

Westbrook Junior College 

Pennsylvania College for 
Women 

Junior College of Connec- 
ticut 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Hunter College 

Meredith College 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to Cornell University (or "I give and 
bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital") the 

sum of % for use in connection with the 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift shall be made in whole or in part 
for any specific purpose in the program of the School of 
Nursing such use may be specified. 



It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

3 Write to: Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
525 East (38th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 



Is 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information 
which will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing 
school entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location. 



Date diploma received or expected. 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19 

Please send me an application blank (check if desired) 

(See page 12.) 



k 



Index 



Absences, 17 

Accreditation of the school, 9 

Activities, 18; Nurses Residence, 18; 
Alumnae Association, 20; recreation, 
18; residence and marriage, 19, 20; 
school government, 19; counseling 
services, 20 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
32-41 

Admission requirements for, 10; appli- 
cation for, 12; credit requirements, 
11; educational requisites, 10 

Advanced standing, 13 

Age and health requirements, 10 

Aim of school, 5 

Alumnae Association, 20, 41; Irene Sut- 
liffe Fund, 16 

Anatomy, 22, 25 

Application for admission, 12 

Assistant professors, 35 

Assistants in instruction, 38, 39 

Associate professors, 34 

Associated with the faculty, 38-41 

Basic nursing program, 21; professional 

curriculum, 21 
Bequest, form of, 45 
Biochemistry, 22, 25 
Biological and physical sciences, 25 

Calendar, 3 

Career opportunities in nursing, 4 

Clinics, 7-8 

Committee for Scholarships, 15, 16, 41 

Communicable disease nursing, 22, 28 

Contents, 2 

Cornell University, 5, 6; degree, 13; 
advisory committee on pre-nursing 
students, 33; Medical College faculty, 
38 

Council of the School, 32 

Counseling services, 20 



Courses, description of, 25-31 
Credit requirements, 11 
Curriculum, professional, 21; first year, 
22; second year, 23; third year, 24 

Degree, 13 

Description of courses, 25-31 

Development of Behavior in Children, 
23, 31 

Diet Therapy, 22, 23, 28 

Diploma, 13 

Division of Child Development, De- 
partment of Pediatrics, 23, 41 

Educational requisites, 10, 11 
Emeritus professors, 34 
Executive faculty, 33 
Expenses, 14 

Facilities for instruction, 7-9 

Faculty, 34-38; associated with, 38-41; 
committees of, 33 

Faculty instructors, 35-37 

Family and Community Health, 24, 26 

Fees and expenses, 14; method of pay- 
ment, 14, 15 

Financial aid, 15, 16 

Graduation, 12, 13; advanced standing, 
13; degree and diploma, 13 

Head nurses, 40, 41 
Health service, 16, 17 
History of school, 5, 6 
History of Nursing, 23, 26 

Joint Administrative Board, 32 

Lecturers, 39 
Libraries, 7 
Loan fund, 16 

Maintenance, 15 

Marriage, 19-20 

Medical Nursing, 22, 24, 28, 29 



47 



48 INDEX 

Medicine, 22, 28 
Microbiology, 22, 25 

New York Hospital, 5-8; nursing super- 
visors, 40; head nurses, 40, 41; staff, 
40-41 

Nurses Residence, 7, 18-19 

Nursing and allied arts — general, 27; 
Nursing Arts I, 22, 27; Nursing Arts 
II, 22, 27 

Nutrition, 28; department of, 41; Nu- 
trition and Cookery, 22, 28 

Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing, 
23, 30; Obstetrics and Gynecology, 
23, 30 

Officers of administration, 33 

Operating Room Nursing, 23, 30 

Orientation, 22, 27 

Out-Patient Department, 8, 24 

Out-Patient Nursing, 24, 26 

Pathology, 22, 25 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 8, 41 

Pediatric Nursing, 23, 30, 31; pediatrics, 

23, 30, 31 
Personality Growth and Development, 

22, 26 
Pharmacology I, 22, 27; Pharmacology 

II, 22, 27 
Physical Education, 22, 23, 25 
Physiology, 22, 25 
Private Patient Nursing, 24, 29 
Professional Adjustments I, 22, 26; 

Professional Adjustments II, 24, 27 
Professors, 34 



Program, basic nursing, 21 

Promotion and graduation, 12, 13; seel 

Advanced standing, Degree, Diploma 
Psychiatric Nursing, 24, 31; psychiatry,! 

24, 31 
Public health affiliations, 9, 24 
Public Health Nursing, 24, 26 

Recreational facilities, 18, 19 
Registration, State, 9 
Residence and marriage, 19-20 

Scholarships, 15, 16 

School government, 19 

School of Nursing, administrative of- 
ficers, 33; faculty committees, 33 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing, 
22,26 

Social Sciences, 26 

Social Service Departments, 9, 41 

State registration, 9 

Student life and activities, 18-20 

Students now in school, 42-44 

Supervisors, nursing, 40 

Surgical Nursing, 22, 24, 29, 30; Surgery, 
22, 29 

Tuition, 14 

Uniforms, 14; see also Maintenance 
Urological Nursing, 24, 29 

Vacations, 17 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 
9, 24, 41 

Ward Activities and Relationships, 24 
27 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



JULY 29, 1951 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1951-52 SESSIONS 



Term Dates 1951-52 

Oct. 1, 1951 — Jan. 20, 1952 

Jan. 21, 1952 — May 11, 1952 

May 12, 1952 — Sept. 28, 1952 

Sept. 29, 1952 — Jan. 18, 1953 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of 
New York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from 
York Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is reached most easily through the main 
entrance of the Hospital on East 68th Street (east of York Ave- 
nue) . The Nurses Residence is at the corner of York Avenue and 
70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus, M-7, east-bound, runs to the 
Medical Center. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 43. July 29, 1951. Number 3. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1951-52 

525 EAST 68TH STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Contents 



Calendar 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim of the School 5 

Accreditation of School 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History 6 

Facilities for Instruction 8 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 11 

Fees and Expenses 15 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 17 

Health Service 18 

Vacations and Absences 19 

Student Life and Activities 20 

Basic Nursing Program 23 

Description of Courses 27 

Administration 35 

Faculty 38 

Associated with the Faculty 42 

Students in the School 46 

Form of Bequest 49 

Index 51 



Picture Credits: 
Ben Greenhaus, Anthony Lanza, Stan Lee 



Calendar 



Sept. 24 Monday 
Sept. 29 Saturday 
Oct. 12 Friday 
Nov. 22 Thursday 
Dec. 24 Monday 
Dec. 25 Tuesday 



Jan. 1 Tuesday 



Feb. 12 
Feb. 22 
May 30 
July 4 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 27 
.Sept. 30 
Oct. 13 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 27 
Dec. 24 
Dec. 25 



Tuesday 

Friday 

Friday 

Friday 

Monday 

Saturday 

Tuesday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 



Jan. 1 Thursday 

Feb. 12 Thursday 

Feb. 23 Monday 

May 30 Saturday 

July 4 Saturday 



1951 

Commencement 

Registration of freshmen students 

Holiday: Columbus Day 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1952 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 
Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
Holiday: Memorial Day 
Holiday: Independence Day 
Holiday: Labor Day 
Registration of freshmen students 
Commencement 
Holiday: for Columbus Day 
Holiday: Presidential election 
Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 
Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 
Holiday: Christmas Day 

1953 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 
Holiday: for Washington's Birthday 
Holiday: Memorial Day 
Holiday: Independence Day 



Career Opportunities in Nursing 

Nursing is recognized as one of the vital health services of the world 
and the well-prepared young woman faces a broad challenge. As a 
group, nurses constitute one of the largest single professional bodies 
of women in this country. With over 300,000 now practicing, their 
numbers are greater than ever before and it has been estimated that 
400,000 nurses will be needed by 1954. 

The scope of activity of the modern professional nurse grows wider 
as the field of the health services broadens. The many advances in 
general and medical science are making available not only new and 
improved treatment of illness but also means by which sickness may 
be avoided and optimum health enjoyed. In the accomplishment of 
these advances, the professional nurse stands shoulder to shoulder 
with the doctor and by his side she helps, through the practice of her: 
particular skills, to bring to thousands of individuals the benefits of 
this new knowledge. 

Modern therapeutic procedures have become increasingly complex 
and in addition, there is greater understanding of the ways in which 
health is affected by the environment and by the individual's relation- 
ships with other people. 

These facts make it necessary for the effective nurse to be a person 
who is herself well-adjusted and professionally prepared in the broad- 
est sense of the word. She must not only possess manual dexterity 
based on sound scientific knowledge, but must have an understanding P 
of human behavior and of the many social and economic .problems! Pi ; 
of the world in which we live. 

Graduate nurses are active in local, state, and national public health 
agencies, in hospitals, schools, industry, and innumerable other situa 
tions where health service and health instruction are needed. Like 
other professional practitioners, the nurse often prepared herself as i 
specialist in one of the clinical fields such as psychiatry, pediatrics, oi 
obstetrics. 

A sound preparation in a good basic program is the most impor 
tant first step toward a successful and satisfying career in nursing 
This provides a firm foundation upon which to build for increasing ^ 

activities and responsibilities. l[ 

lo 

cou 

lit 



Y\ 



The Aim of the School 



Inherent in the philosophy upon which the program of the School 
is based is the belief that the development of the student herself 
into a well-integrated and responsible individual is basic to all other 
(objectives. In the selection of students, effort is made to choose those 
Iwhose personality, education and interests would seem to make them 
able to profit most from the experiences offered. Each is assisted in 
ibecoming cognizant of the world in which she lives, of the needs and 
desires of people, and of the ways in which these may affect emotional 
;and physical well-being. 

It is the aim of the school to prepare a graduate who will be a 
qualified practitioner of nursing in beginning positions in hospitals, 
;public health agencies and the many other situations where profes- 
sional nursing service is needed. 



Accreditation of School 

This school is accredited by the National Nursing Accrediting 
Service as one of the few schools which prepare students for beginning 
positions in public health nursing in addition to preparing them for 
[practice in hospitals and in other fields of nursing. It is an active 
member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing and is, 
of course, accredited by the New York State Department of Education. 



State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates are eligible for admission to the examination for licensure 
administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are expected 
to take the first examination given after completion of the nursing 
course. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the gradu- 
ate of the school as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

York. Having become registered in New York State, it is possible 
to apply for registration without examination in other states. In 
New York State, citizenship, or declared intention of becoming a 
citizen, is required. If citizenship is not completed within seven years 
from the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

The New York State Nurse Practice Act states that a nurse must be 
licensed by examination in the state in which she graduated. For this 
reason, graduates of this school are urged to take State Board ex- 
aminations in New York State rather than in another state as they 
may wish to practice in New York State at a future date. 



History 



This School of Nursing was one of the first to be founded in the 
United States; it is seventy-four years old. As early as 1799, Dr. Val- 
entine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician, organized a series 
of lectures for nurses combined with a course of practical instruction 
on the wards. Although the theoretical content was meager and the 
practical instruction not systematically planned, these classes focused 
attention on the fact that women who had some preparation for their 
work gave better care to patients than those without instruction. Each 
year the program was amplified and in 1877 a formal training school 
for nurses was established "to consist of one teacher and 24 pupils.' 

GROWTH OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

The school was for many years an integral part of The New York 
Hospital, the second oldest hospital in America maintained by private 
endowment. George the Third of England granted the Hospital its 
charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title of The 
Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. This title 
was changed in 1810 to the present one of The Society of the New 
York Hospital. While its roots extend far into the past, the Hospital 
has consistently been sensitive and responsive to the changing needs oi 
the community and to the progress of science. One evidence of this has 
been the gradual increase in the functions and size of the institution 
which has necessitated expansion and re-location to correspond with 
the growth of the city and with the increasing scope of knowledge 
related to health. The present site and buildings are the third ii 
has occupied. 



i 



HISTORY OF SCHOOL 7 

SCHOOL BECOMES PART OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

The program and organization of the School of Nursing has grown 
and changed to keep pace with the health needs of society. The first 
course was eighteen months in length. After thirteen years this was in- 
creased to twenty-four months and in 1896 to three years. It was fitting 
that in 1942, on the 65th anniversary of the founding of the school, it 
should have become a part of Cornell University, thus making avail- 
able the resources of two great institutions, each of which has a long 
history and a notable record of achievement in the fields of education 
and public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
Government's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
under the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object 
shall be ... to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a re- 
markable system of higher education. However, it received its greatest 
impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under 
Ithe influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first 
ipresident, determined the form of the new University. In 1864, an 
(agreement was reached with the legislature of New York State which 
[resulted in the founding of "a University of a new type ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study." This com- 
(bination of federal, state and private interests and resources is unique, 
[t gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policies 
|of the University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

One field of service after another has found preparation for its 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an association 
Detween the Cornell University Medical College and The New York 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the two 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructed 
buildings of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the 
1 East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for nursing was 
' ' first brought under the auspices of the University in July, 1 942, when, 
by agreement between the Trustees of the University and the Gover- 
nors of The New York Hospital, the School of Nursing, long con- 
ducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made a school 
within the University. 

: - 

tic ; 
vi 



U 



Facilities for Instruction 



Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the 
nursing school. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, 
laboratories and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching 
unit on the second floor of the Nurses' Residence while others are pro- 
vided in the Hospital and in the Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all the 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various community 
agencies of the city. 

LIBRARIES 

The library of the school contains a wide selection of materials on 
nursing and related fields, including complete sets of important 
medical and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. It is under the 
direction of a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library of 
the medical college are readily accessible and supplement those of the 
nursing school in such a way as to make available unusual resources to 
both the students and faculty of the school. A librarian is in attendance 
in both libraries. Additional small libraries are adjacent to the nursing 
conference rooms on the Hospital floors in all departments. Through 
the New York Public Library, valuable supplementary materials are 
placed at the disposal of instructors and students as needed. 

WIDE EXPERIENCE IN CLINICAL SERVICES 

The clinical facilities of The New York Llospital are unsurpassed 
for the care and study of patients. The Hospital is comprised of five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both 
in-patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching 
and for the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized 
clinical services are therefore available which are seldom found within 
a single organization. The Hospital has a capacity of over 1,100 beds 
and during the past year 27,272 patients were admitted, exclusive ol 
newborns. The conduct of research in all clinical departments give; 
the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of th( 
part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects 
Authenticity of the findings in such studies depends in no small degree 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 9 

on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the special- 
ties of communicable disease (including tuberculosis) , medical neu- 
rology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat disorders, ortho- 
pedic, plastic and neuro-surgery, and ophthalmology. The Woman's 
Clinic has a capacity of 206 adults and 112 newborns and provides 
for obstetric and gynecologic patients. During the past year 4,053 
babies were born in this clinic. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 95 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children and the services 
of a play therapist offer opportunities for the student of nursing to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick 
children. There is a nursery school within the Division of Child 
Development. Here the student works with and observes the develop- 
ment of the normal child, and is thus better able to evaluate devia- 
tions from the normal which may accompany illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity 
of 109 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational 
and recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of the 
mentally ill. The close connection between the psychiatric medical 
and nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a 
consultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the 
relationship between mental and physical illness throughout her ex- 
perience in the Hospital. 

OUT-PATIENT SERVICES 

The Out-Patient Department provides excellent opportunity for the 
study of patients who are treated without being admitted to the Hos- 
pital. Last year there were 277,128 visits to this Department, an aver- 
age of 962 each clinic day. Opportunity is provided for participation 
in the instruction and guidance of expectant mothers through mothers' 
classes, family studies, and nutrition conferences. Students assist with 
various aspects of the treatment and follow-up on venereal diseases 
and many other activities related to the care of patients coming to the 
Out-Patient Department. 



10 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

PUBLIC HEALTH AFFILIATIONS 

Experience in the health teaching and in the nursing care of patients 
in their homes is afforded through cooperation with the Visiting Nurse 
Service of New York and other community agencies. An eight-week 
experience in public health nursing is available to a limited number 
of students in the senior year through arrangement with the New York 
State Department of Health. Students with good scholastic records 
and a definite interest in public health nursing as a career are given 
preference among those who request this latter experience. 

The Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center, located within two blocks 
of the Hospital, is another agency which offers convenient opportunity 
for student observations of community health programs. 

The staffs of the Social Service Departments of the Center partici- 
pate in the instruction of student nurses through lectures, conferences, 
and case discussions. 



Requirements for 
Admission and Graduation 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students enter the School of Nursing on the recommendation 
of the faculty Committee on Admissions which reviews all applica- 
tions. Since nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who 
have a deep interest in public service, those candidates are selected 
whose credentials indicate high rank in scholarship, personal fitness 
for nursing, maturity, and good general health. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifica- 
tions, there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is ex- 
pected that applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. 
The results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a 
dental examination must be submitted at the time of application. 
Inoculation against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox 
will be required of all students before admission to the school. 

EDUCATIONAL REQUISITES 

The minimum educational requisites for admission are satisfactory 
completion of at least two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive 
of physical education) . The applicant may take this college work at 
Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, or at any university or senior 
or junior college accredited by one of the regional associations of 
colleges and secondary schools. 

When transfer to this school is anticipated, it is preferable for 
the first two years of college work to be part of a program in Liberal 
Arts or Home Economics rather than one designated as "Nursing" or 
"Pre-Nursing." 

Because the work of the nurse requires that she have an understand- 
ing of human reactions and of social factors influencing community 
development, that she be able to express herself well and participate in 
community planning for nursing services, it is important that she 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

obtain a sound background in history, psychology and other social 
sciences, as well as in literature, English, and foreign languages. With 
the exception of psychology, indicated below, specific requirements in 
these subjects are not laid down because a variety of satisfactory com- 
binations can be accepted. A sound two-year liberal arts program serves 
as the best foundation on which to build all professional advancement. 

Physical and biological sciences are important in the preparation for 
admission, but should not be taken at the expense of the subjects re- 
ferred to above. Obviously, the young woman who can devote more 
than two years to her liberal arts preparation has more leeway to in- 
clude several science courses in her college work as well as further 
general academic courses. Unquestionably this would be desirable in 
preparation for many positions in the field of nursing. 

In addition to the academic and health requirements, consideration 
will be given to the applicant's personal fitness for nursing. 

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

Within the two-year liberal arts program required for admission, 
indicated above, the only specific requirements are as follows: 

Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Human Anatomy, Physiology and Bacteriology are not accepted 
as fulfilling the 6-hour credit required in biological science as 
these are included in the professional program. 
Not more than 12 hours of biological science will be counted to- 
ward meeting the 60 credit hours required for admission. 

In general, the principle applies that those courses given within the 
School of Nursing cannot be credited toward meeting admission re- 
quirements, because there is no allowance within the professional cur- 
riculum for electives. 

It is suggested that you take this bulletin with you each time you 
register for your program in your first two years of college, and show 
this section to your adviser, who will help you in selection of courses 
to meet these requirements. Applicants who do not meet in full the 
specific subject requirements for admission, but who have a good 
record of two or more years of college, are encouraged to communicate 
with the Dean of the School of Nursing for consideration of the credits 
which can be offered. Assistance can also be given in arranging plans 
for taking required subjects in summer session. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 13 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
J ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the 
form at the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain 
psychometric tests are required before admission. The applicant is 
asked to meet the charge of $5.00 for these tests. 

Arrangements for a personal interview will be made with the ap- 
plicant whose record shows promise of meeting the requirements of the 
school. She will meet with a member of the Committee on Admissions 
of the school in New York, or, if this is not practicable, with an alumna 
or other qualified person designated by the Committee and living in 
the vicinity of the applicant. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon noti- 
fication of acceptance to the school. The full amount is credited to- 
ward fees payable at registration. The deposit is not refundable if the 
candidate withdraws her application. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible edu- 
cational background preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal applica- 
tion should be made during the second term of the first college year 
if the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college year. 
When all application forms are received, including the report of the 
psychometric test and a transcript covering the first year of college 
work, and these appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted 
pending satisfactory fulfillment of all remaining requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 
PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

The established system of grading is a scale of F to A, with D as 
the lowest passing grade. An average of C for each term is required 
for promotion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
courses Nursing Arts I, Nursing Arts II, Pharmacology I. A grade be- 
low C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which 
is less than C places a student on condition. This must be removed 
by the end of the next term to insure further promotion. A student 
on condition must observe certain limitations in relation to her social 
activities. 



14 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the 
judgment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she 
can complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable length of 
time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, 
in which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the 
instructor, if the course is available. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the 
student to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory 
to it. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a 
Promotion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice 
and her relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into ac- 
count. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her 
work or who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the 
qualifications which are important for a good nurse may be put on 
condition or asked to withdraw from the school. The school reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of 
the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for nursing. The student is kept informed of her progress 
through frequent reports and individual term conferences, and every 
effort is made to provide assistance and guidance which will help her 
succeed in the school. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The Society of 
the New York Hospital. In order to qualify for the degree and diploma, 
the student must maintain a cumulative average of C for the three- 
year program, and must have completed satisfactorily all of the theory 
and practice outlined in this catalogue. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before admis- 
sion may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience. An 
exemption may be granted up to a maximum of 16 weeks. An average 
of B in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for 
favorable consideration. Exemption must be requested at the begin- 
ning of the last term of the second year. 



Fees and Expenses 



Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as follows: 

First Second Third 

FEES Year Year Year Total 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 200.00 $150.00 $100.00 450.00 

Public Health Affiliation 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 3.00 3.00 3.00 9.00 

Health 12.00 12.00 12.00 36.00 

Graduation 25.00 25.00 

Student Organization 5.25 5.25 5.25 15.75 

$260.25 $170.25 $205.25 $635.75 

OTHER EXPENSES (Subject to variation) 

Aprons and accessories of uniforms .... $ 44.25 $ 44.25 

Uniform shoes 14.70 $ 14.70 29.40 

Uniform sweater 5.50 5.50 

Uniform cape (optional) 20.50 20.50 

Gymnasium suit 10.00 10.00 

Books, keys, bandage scissors, and 

miscellaneous (approx.) 50.00 $ 5.00 5.00 60.00 

Rental laboratory coat 1.00 1.00 

Rental public health uniforms 5.00 5.00 

Miscellaneous expenses in connection 

with field trips, etc. 2.00 2.00 30.00 34.00 

$147.95 $ 7.00 $ 54.70 $209.65 

*TOTAL FEES AND EXPENSES $408.20 $177.25 $259.95 $845.40 

* For those few senior students who are granted an elective experience of eight weeks with 
the N. Y. State Department of Health, there is an additional expense of approximately $260.00. 



15 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon tentative acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is 
required. This is credited toward the tuition for the first year but is 
not refundable if the application is withdrawn. The remainder of 
the $200.00 tuition, amounting to $175.00, is payable at registration. 
All other first year fees are also payable on registration day. 

Students will be billed in advance for second and third year fees 
which become due on the first day of the Fall term of each year. These 
fees must be paid not later than twenty days after the date they are 
due. An exception is the fee for graduation which is due on the first day 
of the Summer term in the third year and is payable within twenty 
days of that date. This fee is refundable if the student is not graduated. 
The Student Organization fee is payable to the class treasurer. All 
fees and expenses incurred during the program must be paid before 
graduation. 

The school reserves the right to change its fees as necessary to con- 
form with economic trends. 

None of the articles listed under "Other Expenses" should be ob- 
tained before admission to the school. Uniform accessories, shoes, and 
sweater will be ordered after registration and are paid for upon de- 
livery. Estimated expenses for books include approximately $10.00 for 
optional purchases. A list of necessary personal equipment and the 
fees payable on registration day will be sent to each student shortly 
before registration day. 

MAINTENANCE 

Rooms and a reasonable amount of laundry are provided each 
student without cost. In addition, a cash allowance of $22.40 every 
two weeks, except during vacations, is given each student for the 
purchase of meals. # The necessary dresses (except the public health 
uniform) and caps are provided without charge. Uniforms and caps 
remain the property of the school and are returned on graduation 
or withdrawal. 

* Meal allowance and laundry are not provided during the eight-week elective experience 
with the N. Y. State Department of Health. This experience is available to only a few seniors. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 



FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Committee for Scholarships of the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, a committee of lay women, makes 
available a fund from which scholarships and grants-in-aid are 
awarded each year, usually in amounts of $100, $200, and $300. These 
scholarships are open to both entering students and students already 
in the school when need is a factor. They are awarded on the basis 
of the student's all-round record as indicated by academic work, 
participation in school and community activities, and qualities in- 
dicating promise of growth and a contribution to nursing. 

Application is made to the Dean. For entering students, application 
is made at the time of application for admission to the school, and 
grants are made on recommendation of the Admissions Committee. 
Awards are regarded as final only after the student has enrolled. Stu- 
dents already in the school should make application not later than 
May 15 for grants to be used in the following school year. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

Loans are available through this fund after the first term in the 
school for students who are in need of financial aid. Applications are 
made to the Dean and are accepted at any time. However, students 
are encouraged to plan as far as possible in the Spring for the follow- 
ing school year and to place applications by May 15. 

LOUISA WARDNER SCUDDER FUND 
Income from this fund is used for purposes of recreation or to fi- 
nance a needed rest or convalescence for one or more students. 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the school 
and in honor of Irene Sutliffe, the Director of the school from 1886 to 
1902, scholarship grants are available to graduates of the school for 
post-graduate study. They are granted primarily to alumnae who are 
qualifying for specific positions connected with the School of Nursing. 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
A few scholarships are available from these funds, primarily for 
graduate nurses. 

17 



18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



For information on scholarships and grants-in-aid available to 
students taking their first two years of academic work at Cornell in 
Ithaca, write to Scholarship Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell 

University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

# # * # # 

The following three scholarships are available to residents of 
New York State, making application while in high school: 

STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and aca- 
demies. Annual award $350 for each of four years while in attendance 
in any approved college in the State. This scholarship may therefore 
be used for the first two years of college required for admission to the 
School of Nursing, and continues for the first two years in the School 
of Nursing. Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local 
high school principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE WAR ORPHANS SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents 
of New York State who are graduates of its common schools and 
academies and who are children of deceased or disabled veterans of 
World War I. Annual award $350 towards tuition plus $100 for main- 
tenance for each of four years while in attendance in any approved 
college in the State. This scholarship may therefore be used for the 
first two years of college required for admission to the School of 
Nursing and continues for the first two years in the School of Nursing. 
Awarded on the basis of Regents examinations under regulations of 
the State Education Department. Apply to local high school principal, 
or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE CORNELL SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and aca- 
demies. Annual award $200 reduction in tuition for each of four 
years. This scholarship may be used by students who take the first 
two years of their academic work at Cornell in Ithaca and for the 
first two years in the School of Nursing. Awarded after a competi- 
tive examination. Apply to local high school principal, or to Com- 
missioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 



Health Service 



Because good health is of the utmost importance, the school main- 
tains a health service under the general direction of a committee of the 
faculty with a physician appointed to the staff of the school. Upon 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 19 

admission to the school a physical examination by the school physician 
and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray is required 
every six months, and a physical examination during each school year. 
A Schick test is performed on all students after admission to the school; 
immunization to diphtheria is administered to those reacting positively. 
Mantoux tests will be given during the preclinical period and for 
those who are negative, will be repeated at regular intervals. In addi- 
tion, B. C. G. vaccine is provided to negative reactors. 

A well-equipped infirmary with necessary staff is maintained in the 
Nurses Residence. Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will 
be limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses, students will be cared for gratuitously in the 
Hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for first year 
students, and not more than four weeks at any one time for second and 
third year students. Minimal charges will be made if the stipulated 
allowance of infirmary or hospital care is exceeded. Expenses for special 
nursing care and special therapies must be borne by the student or 
her family. 

All students pay a health fee totaling $36.00 during the three years. 
This fee covers examinations, immunizations, and care in the hospital 
and infirmary, as referred to above. Only emergency surgery is included. 
This is defined as surgical procedures which, in the opinion of the 
school physician or a consulting surgeon of The New York Hospital 
staff, are necessary for the immediate welfare and safety of the student. 
The fee does not include remedial surgery for the correction of chronic 
defects. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a stu- 
dent's health makes it unwise for her to remain in the school, she may 
be required to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any 
time. 



Vacations and Absences 



A vacation of four weeks is given each year. Students entering with 
a baccalaureate degree, who have an exemption of time, may have a 
slightly shorter vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged to 
conform to the requirements of the educational program but usually 
fall within the Summer months. 

As a result of absences, the repetition of a course of study or special 
examinations may be required, class registration may be changed and 
nursing practice may have to be made up. 



Student Life and Activities 



RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses' Residence, a sixteen-story fireproof 
building adjacent to the Hospital. Every effort has been made in the 
construction and equipment of the Residence to provide for the normal 
and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively fur- 
nished single rooms. All rooms have running water and each of the 
eight student floors is equipped with ample baths, showers, and toilet 
facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining 
kitchenette for informal gatherings. 



RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

In addition to the lounges for informal and formal use, a large audi- 
torium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun roofs and a 
hobby room are also available for general use. Students who have had 
preparation in music are urged to keep up their interest and practice; 
pianos are available. Student activities planned jointly with the Cornell 
University Medical College are a regular part of the recreation and 
include glee club and dramatic productions. Programs are presented 
at intervals during the year. Students are hostesses at Open House on 
some Sunday evenings when friends are welcomed to games, conversa- 
tion, and refreshments. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach 
equipment and an outdoor grill are available. 

20 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 21 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of representatives of those living in the residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for 
friends and relatives at a nominal charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless 
in music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Com- 
mittee, students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities 
as membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum 
of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The 
Blue Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships, the 
Christian Nurses' Fellowship and the Newman Club. Guest speakers 
and planned forums provide an opportunity for exchange of thought 
on many subjects. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule 
which is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all stu- 
dents. The Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, 
Judicial Council and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on 
Student Affairs acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organization 
and, with the Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings 
which provide for informal discussions of school activities and prob- 
lems. 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one 
or more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater 
problem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course 
or study, freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

is important. For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a 
student who is contemplating marriage during her period in the school 
to discuss her proposed plans with the Dean or her representative and 
to obtain permission to remain in the school. Permission is granted 
on an individual basis which takes into consideration the student's 
record of achievement, health, and other evidence of ability to carry 
her program with the additional responsibility of marriage. Likewise, 
a married student, if she so requests, will be given permission to live 
outside the Residence provided, in the judgment of the school, this 
will not interfere with her school responsibilities. The faculty record 
their belief that responsibility for maintaining the quality of her work 
and for her continuing participation in school activites must be 
accepted by the student. Married applicants are accepted if in the 
judgment of the Admissions Committee they meet these requirements. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The school maintains active counseling services which are available 
at all times to any student who needs assistance, either in connection 
with routine matters that may come up in her normal work in the 
school or in connection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that 
those students who need help on questions of educational program, 
finances, health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to 
those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for 
any student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase 
of her life while in the School of Nursing. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national 
professional organization of nurses first known as the Nurses Associ- 
ated Alumnae of the United States and Canada, now the American 
Nurses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part 
of the Cornell University Alumni Association. 

One of the lounges of the residence is known as the Alumnae Room, 
and the alumnae meetings and many alumnae functions are held in 
this room. 



The Basic Nursing Program 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 11 and 12. 

Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry — (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects 45 

Total (Pre-Professional) 60 

PROFESSIONAL (3 years). In the School of Nursing. 

Semester Hours Credit 
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 

Orientation (no credit) 

Physical Education (no credit) 

Biological Science 7.5 

Biochemical Science 3 

Social Science 4 4 3-5 

Nutrition 2 1 .5 

Pharmacology 2.5 

Nursing Arts 7.5 2 

Clinical Nursing 18 22 18.5 



Total (Professional) 44.5 27 24.5 96 

Grand Total {Required for B.S. in Nursing) 156 

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of three calendar years. 
Each year is divided into three terms. In each clinical service, related 
classes, conferences, and bedside instructions are given concurrently 
with practice and emphasis is placed on disease prevention and health 
instruction. The student receives selected experiences in evening and 
night duty. An introduction to community nursing is provided 
through conferences and observation in various agencies assisting with 
health problems. The student participates in discussions centering 
around family health and assists in the referral of patients requiring 
nursing care after hospital discharge. An eight-week period of super- 
vised practice in family health service is provided through affiliation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. 

The school reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum as 
the need arises. The professional program of theory and experience 
follows. 

23 



24 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FIRST YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The first twenty-five weeks are devoted primarily to class and labora- 
tory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the 
pavilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at Christmas 
time. During the last half of the year the student is assigned to the 
Departments of Medicine and Surgery for theory and practice in those 
clinical fields. The services in which she has experience include, in 
addition to general medicine and general surgery, such specialties as 
ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology, and communicable disease. 
A vacation of three weeks is given in the last term. The following 
courses are taken: 

Course Class *Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Orientation 120 15 

Nursing Arts I 121 141 4.5 

Nursing Arts II 122 193 3 

Pharmacology I 124 15 0.5 

Pharmacology II 125 30 2 

Anatomy 100 60 2.5 

Physiology 101 45 2.5 

Biochemistry 102 60 3 

Microbiology 103 45 2 

Pathology 104 15 0.5 

Personality Growth and Development 110 15 1 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing Ill 30 2 

Professional Adjustments I 113 15 1 

Nutrition and Cookery 130 30 1 

Diet Therapy 131 30 1 

Medicine 140 32 2 

Communicable Diseases 141 13 1 

Principles of Medical Nursing (Including Com- 
municable Disease) 142 60 4 

Practice of Medical Nursing 143 12 3 

Surgery (Inch specialties other than Urology) 150 30 2 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 151 45 3 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 152 12 3 

Physical Education 10 55 

Total 974 24 44.5 

•In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 25 

SECOND YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The three terms of the second year are devoted to classes and 
practice in the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development, the 
Woman's Clinic, and the Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Op- 
erating Room. There is a four-week vacation during the summer term. 

In the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development, the stu- 
dent has an opportunity for experience in the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment, Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor, and the 
unit for older children. In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for prac- 
tice include experience in the more traditional types of obstetrical 
service as well as activities which assist the student to become familiar 
with the newer concepts of maternal and new-born care which are 
embodied in such terms as "preparation for labor" and "rooming-in." 
The student's practice includes the Out-Patient Department, delivery 
floor, nursery, postpartum unit, and gynecological division. During 
the periods in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery, experience 
is provided in Diet Therapy practice and in Communicable Disease 
nursing. Eight weeks are spent in the Operating Room. Courses are 
as follows: 

Course Class *Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

History of Nursing 112 30 2 

Development of Behavior in Children 171 30 2 

Pediatrics 170 15 1 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 172 60 4 

♦♦Practice of Pediatric Nursing 173 16 4 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 160 30 2 

Principles of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 161 45 3 

♦♦Practice of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 162 16 4 

Principles of Operating Room Nursing 156 15 1 

Practice of Operating Room Nursing 157 8 2 

Practice of Communicable Disease Nursing 144 4 1 

Practice of Diet Therapy 132 4 1 

Physical Education 10 32 

Total 257 48 27 

*ln addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 

* * Each student has two weeks of Out-Patient Department experience while in the Pediatric 
Service and four weeks of Out-Patient Department experience during her period in the 
Woman's Clinic. 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

THIRD YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

In the third year, sixteen weeks are spent in the Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic where the student gains a keen appreciation of the 
causes of mental and emotional illness, of the ways in which such 
illness may be prevented, and knowledge of the newer methods of 
therapy for its relief. 

An eight-week affiliation is provided with the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York, a family health agency. During this time the student 
has an opportunity, under supervision, to care for patients in their 
homes and to teach members of the family to give necessary care 
between visits of the nurse. Closely preceding or following this, there 
is a four-week period spent in the Medical-Surgical units of the Out- 
Patient Department. This is followed by four weeks in the Private 
Patient Service. A few seniors may have an elective experience with 
the New York State Department of Health. 

During one term of this last year, the senior returns once more to 
the Departments of Medicine and Surgery. She is now ready to accept 
almost complete responsibility for analyzing and planning to meet 
the nursing needs of selected patients. She receives instruction in 
planning the time and assignments of staff personnel, has experience 
as leader of a nursing "team," and is assigned to charge duty on a 
pavilion for limited periods of the day or night. There are four weeks 
of vacation during the summer term. Courses in the third year are: 

Course Class *Wks. Semester 
Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Psychiatry 180 30 2 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 181 60 4 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 182 *16 4 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 116 30 2 

Practice in Public Health Nursing 117 * 8 2 

Family and Community Health 115 20 1.5 

Professional Adjustments II 114 15 

Ward Activities and Relationships 126 15 

^Practice in Out-Patient Nursing (M&S) 118 ** 4 

Practice in Care of Private Patients (M&S) 146 ** 4 

Principles of Urological Nursing 153 15 

Practice of Urological Nursing 154 * 4 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 155 * 4 

Practice of Medical Nursing 145 ** 6 1.5 

Practice in Nutrition Clinic 133 * 2 0.5 

Total ■ 185 48 24.5 

Grand Total (Professional Program) 1,421 120 96 

In addition to the class hours indicated above, there is a minimum of one ( * ) or two ( * * ) 
hours a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients for 
whom the student has some responsibility. 

| Each student has in addition in her second year, two weeks of OPD experience while 
in the Pediatric Department and four weeks of OPT) while in the Woman's Clinic. 




A student makes friends w: 
Clinic of the Hospital. 



small p 



itient she is weighing in the Well-Baby 




A student's life is not all work. The scene is one of the typical single student 
rooms in the Nurses* Residence. 




By learning to work cooperatively with the doctor, the student soon acquires the 
"know-how" of making procedures easier for the patient. Here, she is assisting him 
in obtaining a blood specimen from a patient in an oxygen tent. 



Description of Courses 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 13-14.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. It is a major aim of this course to provide each 
student with the knowledge of good body mechanics in work and play. Through 
individual and group sports, she has the opportunity to become adept in the activity 
which she enjoys the most. A reasonable degree of skill in one or more sports is an 
important factor in the development of a happy recreational life for the individual. 
55 Hours, First Year; 32 Hours, Second Year. Miss McDERMOTT, and assistant. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information 
is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. HINSEY, Dr. GEOHEGAN, Dr. BERRY, Mr. ANDERSON, 
Miss WRIGHT. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course consists of a study of the physiological systems and 
their integration into the total functions of the human body. It is closely related 
to the course in Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. PITTS, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER, Miss 
STOLL, Miss BARRETT. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY . A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism 
of food, and the composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. du VIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GILDER, Dr. 
GENGHOF, Miss CLYMER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY . An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE. 

104. PATHOLOGY. A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the student 
with the principles of general pathology and with the more common clinical labora- 
tory procedures. The pathologic changes associated with inflammation, neoplasia, 
and cardio-vascular disease are presented and illustrated by kodachromes, gross 
specimens, and microscopic slides. The techniques of routine urinalysis, blood 
grouping, RH determination, and blood transfusion are demonstrated. 

15 Hours. First Year. Dr. KELLNER. 

27 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PERSONALITY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. A presentation of the 
biological, sociological, and psychological factors which contribute to the formation 
of the adult personality. The various stages of personality development, psycho- 
logical responses to emotions, and emotional factors, in physical illness are discussed. 
Particular emphasis is placed upon the nurse-patient relationship and the adjust- 
ment of the individual student to the nursing profession. 

15 Hours. First Year. Dr. SHERFEY. 

111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. Study of the patient as a 
person conditioned by psychological and cultural influences. Interrelationship of 
individual, family, and community health, and the work of the nurse in the promo- 
tion of health and the prevention of disease. Lectures, conferences, projects, excur- 
sions to community agencies, reports. 

30 Hours. First Year. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Dr. SIMMONS, Miss SOULE. 

112. HISTORY OF NURSING. In this course the international development of 
nursing is traced from its earliest forms to its present status. The influence of an 
ever-changing society upon nursing education is emphasized. 

30 Hours. Second Year. 

113. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS I. Consideration of the philosophical and 
ethical foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. 
Problems related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by the instructor and the students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours. First Year. Miss LYONS. 

114. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS II. A survey of the nursing field, particu- 
larly the place of the professional organizations, legislation affecting nursing, 
economics of medical and nursing care, the role of the practical nurse, placement 
and counseling agencies, periodicals and international aspects of nursing. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, and special lecturers. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING AND RELATED EXPERIENCES 

115. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. An introduction to the study of 
health problems and services in relation to the family and community. Considera- 
tion is given to the increasing responsibility of the nurse as a member of the 
health team. 

20 Hours. Third Year. Dr. SMILLIE, Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

116. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. A planned program 
of group conferences designed to acquaint the student with the functions of a 
family health agency as part of a community health program, to familiarize her 
with the responsibilities of a field nurse in carrying out these functions, and to point 
out the way these functions and responsibilities demonstrate good public health 
nursing practice. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

117. PRACTICE IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Activities include health super- 
vision of infants, school and pre-school children, and adults; maternity nursing, 
morbidity nursing in the home. Through carefully graded observation, individual 
conferences, case conference, and supervised practice, the student is given increasing 
responsibility for health work with a small, selected group of families. This exper- 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 29 

ience is by affiliation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, which provides 
generalized public health nursing service including bedside care of the sick in their 
homes. 
8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

(Elective Experience in Public Health Nursing: A few senior students who have an 
outstanding record in general and who have shoivn particular interest and ability 
in Public Health Nursing may be offered the opportunity for an elective experience 
with the New York State Department of Health for a period of eight iceeks.) 
118. PRACTICE IN OUT-PATIENT NURSING. Preceding or following affiliation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, each student has an experience in 
selected clinics of the medical and surgical services; there are related family studies, 
conferences with members of the Social Service Department, visits to com- 
munity agencies. 
4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss NEWTON, Miss McMULLAN, and staff. 

NURSING AND ALLIED ARTS — GENERAL 

120. ORIENTATION. These discussions give the beginning student a general 
concept of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the 
individual who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical 
and mental health of the nurse as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in 
her work. 

12 Hours, First Year; ly 2 Hours, Second Year; li/ 2 Hours, Third Year. Miss 
DUNBAR, Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, Dr. HAYES. 

121. NURSING ARTS I. This course is designed to give the student an understand- 
ing of the basic physical needs of individuals and of how these may be met best in 
relation to the nursing care of a patient. There is emphasis upon desirable nurse- 
patient relationships, and instruction is given in the simpler nursing procedures. 
Practice includes the application of basic principles of nursing in the Nursing Arts 
Laboratory, and in the care of convalescent patients on the pavilions of the Hospital. 
146 Hours. First Year. 

122. NURSING ARTS II. A course designed to give the student an understanding 
of advanced nursing principles and procedures, and to assist in the development 
and perfection of skills. It is correlated with lectures on the medical and surgical 
aspects of disease, and with instruction in nursing care pertinent to these conditions. 
Practice includes application of advanced nursing principles and procedures in the 
Nursing Arts Laboratory, and in the care of patients on the pavilions of the 
Hospital. There is opportunity for observation of nursing in the Out-Patient 
Department and for a brief experience in the Central Sterile Supply Department. 
193 Hours. First Year. 

124. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems 
used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calculating 
dosages. It stresses the nurse's responsibility in the administration of medicines. 
15 Hours. First Year. Miss McCLUSKEY. 

125. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse 
in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and com- 
monly used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administra- 
tion, and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the importance of accurate adminis- 
tration of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss PLACE. 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

126. WARD ACTIVITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS. Consideration is given to the 
basic principles which underlie effective working relationships with professional 
and non-professional personnel. The student is also guided in recognizing and plan- 
ning for the use of learning situations as they relate to patients or younger students, 
and she is introduced to the activities which she will undertake when assigned ! 
to senior charge duty. 
15 Hours. Third Year. Miss HARMON, Miss FREDERICK, Miss BRESNAHAN. 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION AND COOKERY. A basic course in normal adult nutrition and 
in food preparation. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are 
discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services in the 
second year.) 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER. 

131. DIET THERAPY. A course designed to present the underlying principles in 
the treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given concurrently with the 
lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. This course is supplemented by confer- 
ence work during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER. 



132. PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY. The application of the principles of diet 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on pavilions of the Hospital. 
4 Weeks, Second Year; 2 Weeks, Third Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYN- 
BERGEN, Miss CLYMER, Miss TILLOTSON, Miss STYCH, Miss WEIHL. 

133. PRACTICE IN NUTRITION CLINIC. During this experience, the student 
learns to teach therapeutic diets to out-patients, adapting these to their social and 
economic backgrounds. Under the supervision of the clinic dietitian. 

2 Weeks. Third Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER, 
Miss RICHMOND. 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize, and interpret required read- 
ing covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

32 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

141. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. A study of communicable diseases, including 
tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

13 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE 
DISEASE NURSING. The principles and methods of nursing care for patients with 
medical, neurogical, and communicable disease are considered. 

60 Hours. First Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Miss 
BROOKS. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

143. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL 
NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of medical nursing 
principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical and neurological 
pavilions of the Hospital. 

Weeks. First Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Mrs. 
BROCKMAN, Miss STIRLING, Miss PLACE, Miss BROOKS, Miss FAWCETT. 

144. PRACTICE OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE NURSING. Two experiences of 
four weeks each are given in which students study and practice medical aseptic 

echnique and nursing as related to the care of patients suffering from communi- 
cable diseases. The community problem presented by certain diseases such as tuber- 
culosis and venereal disease, as well as resources for their diagnosis and treatment, 
are brought to the attention of students through referrals and by individual and 
group conferences with public health nurses, social workers and others who are 
particularly concerned with these problems. 
i Weeks. First and Second Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY 
PLACE, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss STIRLING, Miss FAWCETT. 

145. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING. During the senior year students have 
opportunity to apply their knowledge and skill to the care of patients with complex 
nursing needs. Care of patients through the evening and night hours may be 
included. An overview of the managerial aspects of a clinical unit is given with pro- 
vision for supervised practice. 
8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Mis 
PLACE, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss STIRLING, Miss BROOKS, Miss FAWCETT. 

146. PRACTICE IN CARE OF PRIVATE AND SEMI-PRIVATE PATIENTS. 
This experience offers an opportunity for the student to become aware of the 
needs of patients with a wide variety of socio-economic backgrounds. By means 
of supervised practice, the student also gains an appreciation of the varied methods 
of treating patients with the same diagnosis. 

Weeks. Third Year. Miss POOR, Miss NIELSEN, and staff. 



SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Conditions which require surgery are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. The factors which determine the need for surgical interference and the 
type of operations best suited to the condition are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon 
observations which should be made by the nurse both preceding and following 
operation. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. GLENN and staff. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. By the method of lecture and dem- 
onstration, the students are taught principles of surgical nursing. This includes the 
principles of surgical asepsis and the nursing care of patients with general surgical 
as well as specialized surgical conditions. 

45 Hours. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER. Miss DERICKS, Miss SWAN- 
WICK, Miss DANIELS, Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA. 

152. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. This includes study and supervised 
practice in the application of nursing principles to the care of patients on certain 
of the general and specialized surgical services of the Hospital. The student is 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

guided in gaining a concept of the preventive as well as the therapeutic responsibili- 
ties of the nurse. 

12 Weeks. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss FEDDER, Miss DERICKS, 
Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss DANIELS, Miss MacLEAN. 

153. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. This course is planned to give 
the student a knowledge of the diseases and anomalies of the genito-urinary tract, 
and the principles underlying the care of patients with these conditions. Prepara- 
tion of the patient for self-care on discharge is stressed. Lectures, conferences, 
and demonstrations. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss SWANWICK, Dr. MARSHALL, and staff. 

154. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Opportunity is provided for the 
development of understanding and skill in meeting the special nursing needs of 
patients with urological conditions. Preparations for self-cure on discharge is 
stressed. 

4 weeks. Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss SWANWICK, Miss 
MacLEAN, Miss BUDD. 

155. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. In the third year the student is given 
more responsibility for analyzing and meeting the nursing needs of patients, in- 
cluding preparation for self-care after discharge from the Hospital. In addition, she 
has an opportunity to assist with some of the managerial problems on the pavilions. 
4 weeks. Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss DERICKS, Miss SWAN- 
WICK, Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss MacLEAN, Miss BUDD. 

156. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, dis- 
cussions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods 
of aseptic technique in relation to care of patients at the time of operation. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss OLSON. 

157. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Supervised clinical ex- 
perience and study of the application of nursing principles to the care of patients in 
the Operating Room. Students are given the opportunity to observe and assist 
with operative procedures, to relate this experience to the total care of surgical 
patients and to gain an appreciation of the qualities and abilities essential to 
effective nursing in this field. 

8 Weeks. Second Year. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss OLSON, and staff. 



OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING 



160. OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. This course deals with the clinical, ana- 
tomical, physiological, and pathological aspects of pregnancy, labor, and the puer- 
perium, as well as of the female generative organs. Consideration is given to the 
psychosomatic approach in the prevention of complications, family-sociologic re- 
lationships in child bearing, the nature, development, and adjustment of the 
newborn. 
30 Hours. Second Year. Medical staff of the Woman's Clinic. 



161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. This 
course emphasizes the importance of antepartal observation and instruction, nutri- 
tional needs, infant care, obstetric and gynecologic procedures, current modes and 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

trends in therapy, including the series of exercises for preparation for labor (Natural 
Childbirth) and the application of this method to patient care. 
45 Hours. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss HIGGINSON, Mrs. 
GILPATRICK, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, Mrs. MIGUEL, Miss LIPTON, and Miss 
RYNBERGEN and staff. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Students ob- 
serve and care for infants, obstetric and gynecologic patients under supervision in 
the pavilions, nurseries, labor, and delivery rooms, and Out-Patient Department. 
Nursing care studies, conferences, and field trips are supplementary features of the 
course. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, 
Miss HIGGINSON, Mrs. MIGUEL, Miss LIPTON, Mrs. GILPATRICK. 



PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and 
disease. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Dr. LEVINE and staff. 

171. DEVELOPMENT OF BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN. A study of the normal 
child and his behavior in relation to his growth and needs from infancy to adult- 
hood. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Dr. MERCER. 

172. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the 
application of knowledge and understanding of ways of meeting the child's needs 
in health and during illness; the basic principles in nursing of children and the 
effects of illness on the child and his family. Lectures, case presentations and 
panel discussions. 

60 Hours. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, Miss 
WOODFALL, Miss RYNBERGEN, and staff. 

173. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the ap- 
plication of knowledge to the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, 
and children in the Out-Patient Department and Nursery School. Group con- 
ferences, demonstrations, and nursing care plans. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, 
Miss WOODFALL, Miss DONDERO, Miss SIMMONS, Miss TERRY, Miss PEAR- 
SON, and staff. 



PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the path- 
ology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. The problems frequently encountered 
in infancy, childhood, adolescence, the aging period and senility are discussed. An 
historical survey of the development of psychiatry and the mental hygiene move- 
ment is offered, as well as an introduction to the techniques and social agencies con- 
cerned with helping people meet their problems. 
30 Hours. Third Year. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. 






34 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

181. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The purpose of this course 
is to help the student gain an understanding of the basic principles in the nursing 
care of patients with personality disorders and the nursing techniques utilized 
in their treatment. Field trips are planned to acquaint the student with some of the 
community facilities which are devoted to rehabilitation, as well as prevention 
and treatment of psychiatric illnesses. Psychiatric social service and out-patient 
psychiatric services are included in the student's community experience. The total 
program is oriented toward guiding the student in the development of an objective 
attitude toward emotional disorders, and a broader appreciation of the inter- 
relationships between environmental, somatic, and constitutional factors as they 
influence mental health. 

60 Hours. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss ZIERING, Miss SANTOS, Miss 
MUHS, Miss PAIGE, Mrs. SIMON and staff. 

182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course consists of supervised 
experience in the observation and care of emotionally ill adult and adolescent 
patients during the acute phase of illness, as well as during convalescence. Students 
have an opportunity to participate in many of the currently approved forms of 
psychiatric treatment. These include the following therapies: occupational, recre- 
ational, physical, insulin, electro-convulsive, as well as psychotherapy, in each of 
which there is particular emphasis on the special need of the individual patient. 

16 Weeks. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss ZIERING, Miss SANTOS, Miss MUHS, 
Miss SPARGO, Miss NEWBURG, Miss PAIGE, and staff. 



Administration 



JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD OF 
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE HOSPITAL 



Board of Trustees 

of 
Cornell University 



Meal Dow Becker, Chairman, Board of 

Trustees 
Arthur H. Dean 
Deane Waldo Malott, President of the 

University 

Hamilton Hadley Board of Governors of 
Henry S. Sturgis, Treasurer V The Society of 

ohn Hay Whitney, President J the New York Hospital 

John W. Davis 



Stanhope Bayne-Jones, President 

COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Deane Waldo Malott, Chairman President of Cornell University 

Preston A. Wade "1 

b T I > Trustees of Cornell University 

Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr. "1 Governors of The Society of 

Mrs. Charles S. Payson J the New York Hospital 

David P. Barr President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

'Stanhope Bayne-Jones President, Joint Administrative Board 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-large 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

Joseph C. Hinsey Dean of the Cornell University Medical College 

Elizabeth Ogden, '44 Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Henry N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York 

iWiLsoN G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive 

Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 

Elizabeth Lee Vincent Dean of the State College of Home 

Economics, Cornell University 
35 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Deane Waldo Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D President of University 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones, M.D President, Joint Administrative Board 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Associate Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A. Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Claire Calhoun, M.A. Assistant Director of the Residence 

Rheta B. Glueck, B.A. Assistant in Public Relations 

Georgia Saylor, B.A., B.S. in L.S Librarian 

Mrs. Zdislava M. Kohak, Ph.D Registrar 

Barbara Oldden, B.A. Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki, A.B. Secretary to the Dean 



: 



EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Poor, Secretary 

Dr. Barr Miss Fritz Miss Lyons Miss Schubert 

Dr. Bayne-Jones Miss Hickcox Miss Newton Miss Tuffley 

Miss Carberry Dr. Hinsey Mrs. Overholser Mrs. Wright 
Miss Carrington Miss Klein 



CHAIRMEN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss Ferguson 

Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Library Miss Saylor 

Records Miss Walters 

Student Affairs Miss Frederick 

Scholarships Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: 

First Year Miss Rynbergen 

Second Year Miss Clymer 

Third Year Miss Swanwick 

Student and Staff Health Mrs. Overholser 

Affiliating Students Miss Stokes 

Programs for Graduate Nurses 

Principles and Practices of Nursing 



ADMINISTRATION 37 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Dorothy McMullan, '35 President 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

vIrs. Byron H. Gough Chairman 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Dffice of Dean of Men, Dean of Women Mary Catherine Hudson, 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

ollege of Home Economics Jean Failing, 

Associate Professor of Home Economics, Student Counselor 

College of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

Rollin L. Perry 

Chairman, Advisory Board for Underclassmen 

College of Agriculture Howard S. Tyler, 

Professor in Personnel Administration 
in charge of Vocational Guidance Placement 

Office of Admissions Robert Storandt, 

Associate Director 



Faculty 



Deane Waldo Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of the University 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of 
Nursing, Director of the Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1930. Diploma, Bedford College and Florence Nightingale Internationa] 
Foundation, London, England, 1936.) 

Leo W. Simmons, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Anthropology in Nursing. (B.A., 
Bethany College, W. Va., 1923; B.D., Yale University, 1925; M.A., 1927; Ph.D., 1931.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic A r ursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; M.A., 1951. Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing, 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hos 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A. 
1944.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of 

Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in 

Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia 
University, 1932.) 

Elizabeth U. Wright, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing; 
Director of Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mass- 
achusetts General Hospital, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 1948.) 

38 



FACULTY 39 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Muriel Carbery, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Associate Director of 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1951.) 

Bernice Carrington, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Assistant Director, 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Connecticut Training School for Nurses, 
1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1932; M.A., 1950.) 

Edna Fritz, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Nursing; Head of Medical 
Nursing Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Russell Sage College School of Nursing, 1940; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936; M.A., 1951.) 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director, 
Nurses' Residence. (Diploma, Bouve-Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; B.S., 
New York University, 1930; M.A., 1932.) 

Kathleen Newton, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; Head of 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. [Anatomy], University of Washington, 1934; 
B.S. in Nursing, University of "Washington, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

M. Eva Poor, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing; 
Head of Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B. Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 
1950.) 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons College, 
1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical College, 1938.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School of 
Cursing, Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1949.) 



Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B., University of Illinois, 1920; 
ALA., Columbia University, 1926.) 

FACULTY INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient 
\Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1945.) 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939; B.S., 
946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Dorothy Grace Clymer, B.S., Faculty Instructor in Science. (B.S., Pennsylvania 
tate College, 1943.) 

■ Virginia Daniels, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
urgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Mursing, Chicago, 111., 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1948.) 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Su- 
pervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School 
of Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942.) 

Sarah M. Ferguson, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor 
Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital 
School of Nursing, Boston, Mass., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 



Mildred Gilpatrick, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor, Woman's Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Philadelphia General & 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1949, M.A., 1950.) 



Lilian Henderson Ginsberg, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University 
School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Elizabeth Harmon, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant 
Head of Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 1928; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1951.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Nighi 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas ; 
School of Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1947.) 



Emma Jean Higginson, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic , 
Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Z 
Nursing, Protestant Deaconess Hospital School of Nursing, Evansville, Ind., 1943; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 



Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Anne Hughes, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medicat 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital Schoo 
of Nursing, 1943; B.S., Cornell University, 1943.) 

Dorothy E. Jump, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor, Delivery Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henr) 
Ford Hospital School of Nursing, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, 1943; 
Midwifery Certificate, Maternity Center Association, New York City, 1951.) 

Esther E. Lipton, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, New York City, 1931; B.S., 
Columbia University, 1945; Midwifery Certificate, Maternity Center Association, 
New York City, 1941.) 

H. Rosalind MacLean, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., Adelphi College, 1932; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 



FACULTY 41 

Audrey McCluskey, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Assistant 
Head of Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1948.) 

Dorothy McMullan, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; 
Assistant Head of Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1950.) 

^Eleanor Muhs, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of 
Nursing, Rochester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948.) 

;Edith Nielsen, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; 
Supervisor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

-Lucille Notter, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Public Health Nursing; Assistant 
Director of Education, Visiting Nurse Service of New York City. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing, Louisville, Ky., 1931; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1941; M.A., 1946.) 

Edith V. Olson, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Operating Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Kings County Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1943; B.S., Hunter College, 1949.) 

Doris Place, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Cornell University, 1942; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Wursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School of Nursing, 
Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 

Elvin Santos, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
°sychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Duke University School of Nurs- 
ing, 1943; B.S., Catholic University of America, 1945.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Cursing, New York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

VIary H. Swanwick, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor 
in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of 
Cursing, New York City, 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

,£thel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Super - 
i nsor, Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of 
Mursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1944; Diploma 
n Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 

'[eannette Walters, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Assistant Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursiyig Service. (Diploma 

I'n Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York 

.- Jniversity, 1944; M.A., 1949.) 

■3.UTH Woodfall, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of 
S T ursing, Boston, Mass., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 






42 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Hannah Ziering, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Admin- 
istrative Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Long Island University, 1940; 
Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1943; B.S., Cornell University, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1945.) 

FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D. Dean and Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D. Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D. Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D. Professor of Psychiatry 1 

Robert F. Pitts, M.D. Professor of Physiology 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Ph.D. Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D. Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D. Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D. Professor of Pediatrics 

James M. Neill, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D. Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine i 

Gordon R. Douglas, M.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Charles Berry, M.D. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

William A. Geohegan, M.D. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 1 

Helena Gilder, M.D. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Alice M. Stoll, M.S. Research and Teaching Assistant in Physiology 

Martha J. Barrett, M.A. Research and Teaching Assistant in Physiology i 

Dorothy Genghof, Ph.D. Research Associate in Biochemistry] 

David Anderson, B.A. Research Fellow in Anatomy 



Associated with the Faculty 

assistants in instruction 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School oi 
Nursing, 1931.) 

Dorothy Budd, R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Night Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing. 
1942.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 

Laura Fawcett, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing, Evening Assistant Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1936.) 

Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing; Supervisor, Nurses' Healtl 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New Yorl 
City, 1920.) 



ASSOCIATED WITH FACULTY 43 

nez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
pursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
elphia, Pa., 1935.) 

lorence A. Gollner, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
upervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jersey City Medical 
Center School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Syracuse University, 1949; M.S., 1949.) 

,ouisf. Hazeltine, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. (B.A., Bucknell University, 
946; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1949; B.S., Cornell University, 1949.) 

r,fARTHA E. Jackson, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night 
v.lssistant Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
pursing, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1937.) 

lilUTH E. Kenney, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
ivurgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
fcursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 

•I iIelerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Johnston Hospital 
school of Nursing, Manila, P. I., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) 

■jena J. Saffioti, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
I operating Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Michael's Hospital 
^chool of Nursing, Newark, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 

V Jarv L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
i upervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton 
lospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

I Elizabeth Mary Simmons, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Night Super- 
, isor, Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School 
>f Nursing, Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947.) 

I Charlotte Stirling, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor, 
iedical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New England Hospital for Women 
nd Children, Boston, Mass., 1940; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

Margaret Terry, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
; Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 
chool of Nursing, Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

essie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
\ ng Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 
924.) 

-Iary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psy- 
hiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 
Vaverly, Mass., 1933.) 

'vonne P. Worrell, B.S., Assistant in Physical Education, (B.S., Pennsylvania State 
College, 1949.) 

.ucille Wright, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Science and in Nursing Arts. (Diploma 
n Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., University of 
Colorado, 1950.) 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectura 

Cornell University Medical College 

STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D. Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N. Day Administrative Assistan, 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N. Night Administrative Assistan, 

Vanda Summers, R.N. Evening Administrative Assistant 

Doris F. Bresnahan, B.S., R.N. Day Administrative Assistant 

In Charge of Auxiliary Staff 

Thelma Cobb, R.N. Supervisor of Auxiliary Sta[ 

Edward R. Browne, R.N. Supervisor of Orderlies 

Marjorie Agnew, B.S., R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Dorothy Knapp, R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lois Cantrell, B.S., R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Servict 

Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Servict 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Servict 

Claire Meyerowitz, B.S., R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Servict 

Cora Karstetter, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lucy Hickey, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Vera R. Keane, B.S., R.N. Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service 

HEAD NURSES 
MEDICINE 

Carman, Edna Curtis, Jane, B.S. Walberg, Norma 

Collins, Ona, B.S. Giblin, Edythe 

SURGERY 

Congrave, Constance, B.A. Guild, Charlotte, B.S. Ripepi, Rosemary 

Cullington, Barbara Lubowska, Nina Tomasula, Theresa 

Dieterle, Doris McKeown, Elizabeth Young, Eleanor 

Gleeson, Helen Pruchnik, Blanche 

OPERATING ROOM 

Atkinson, Ona Husted, Sally Skoog, Alverna 

Bosco, Antoinette Knudsen, Margharethe Thompson, Olive 

Cooke, C. Eloise Milone, Marion Torpey, Teresa 

Davis, Vivian Myers, Helen Ward, Alberta 

Derr, Barbara Rau, Rosalie, B.A. Westphal, Freda 

Farmer, Rosemary Rectanus, Dorothy 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

Beaty, Lillian Douyard, Dorothy Mathews, Thelma 

Bott, Alma Ferrara, Lucia Matus, Veronica 

Calder, Elizabeth, B.S. Hawtin, Clara Wright, Miriam 

Colwell, Anna Jackson, Dorothy Young, Kathleen 

Connor, Agnes Knox, Violet 

Derrell, Constance, M.A. Leonard, Yolanda 



ASSOCIATED WITH FACULTY 



45 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



' :/: 



Clark, Evelyn 
Evans, Alberta 
Kinstler, Shirley 
Lambert, Lucille 
Larrow, Joyce 



Clark, Mary 
Gerchak, Helen 
Gerchak, Mary 



Anderson, Marie 
Dobbins, Margaret, M. N. 



Liddle, Evelyn 
Long, Ilene 
Mayer, Patricia 
Meachard, Delia 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 

Kozitsky, Mary- 
Learn, Ruth 
Partington, Gladys 

PEDIATRICS 

Fripp, Carol 
Hurwitz, Flora 



Moroukian, Grace 
Nussbaumer, Elsa 
Riggs, Elise, A.B. 
Rouchleau, Margaret 



Rose, Lefa 
Smith, Helen 



Spencer, Grace 
Zemlock, Margaret 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 
Campbell, Marjorie Fry, Meredith McKee, Beatrice 

Chastko, Helen Gebhart, Mary, B.S. Morrison, Esther 

Creevy, Alma Goodman, Gertrude, B.S. Podereskey, Arlene 

Frany, Eleanor, B.S. Lundgren, Grace Smith, Jane, B.S. 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephenson, B.S., M.S., Director 
Anne Butera, B.S. Elizabeth Richmond, B.S., M.A. 

Meredith Jones, B.S. Marie A. Stych, B.S. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Jeanne Tillotson, B.S. 

Susan Paige, B.S. Marianne Weihl, B.S. 

Virginia Pearson, B.S. 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Mildred Spargo, O.T.R. Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A. Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B. Director, Woman's Clinic 

Melly Simon, Dipl., N. Y. School of Social Work Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

DIVISION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 

Eleanor Reich Consultant, Nursery School 

Eleanor Blumgart, B.A. Director, Nursery School 

Mary Packard, B.S. Teacher, Nursery School 

Evelyn Wolff, B.S., O.T.R. Occupational Therapy 

STAFF OF THE VISITING NURSE SERVICE 

Marian Randall, B.S., R.N. Director 

and Staff 



Students in the School 



Name Class Home From 

Albert, Betty Ann '53 Norwich, N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Alexander, Inge '52 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Arabia, Rose M. '53 West Chester, Pa. Temple University 

Baker, Jo Anne Gorenflo ....'51 Mt. Kisco, N. Y. University of Michigan 

Barrus, Jean Marilyn '52 Piermont, N. Y. New York University 

Benjamin, Betty J. '51 Jersey City, N. J. Conn. College for Women 

Benjamin, Beverly Elinor . '53 Jersey City, N. J. Green Mt. Junior College 

Berg, Helen M. '51 Floral Park, N. Y. Bucknell University 

Bernet, Mary Elizabeth . '53 Johnstown, Pa. University of Pittsburgh 

Birdsall, Elizabeth Ann ... '52 Mount Hermon, Mass. U. of Massachusetts 

Black, Dorothy Helen '53 Wayne, Pa. Oberlin College 

Blaney, Joy '53 Weston, Mass. Mills College 

Blinn, Carolyn Mae '52 Newtown, Pa. State Teachers College, 

East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Burleigh, Ruth Anne '53 Tilton, N. H. Colby College 

Burrage, Margaret G. '52 White Plains, N. Y. Elmira College 

Campbell, Susan G. '51 Chicago, 111. Oberlin College 

Caner, Julia Ann '53 Baltimore, Md. Drew University 

Carter, Patricia Marie '53 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Caruso, Marie D. '52 Mechanicville, N. Y. Russell Sage College 

Ceritelli, Louise Marion ... .'52 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Charlton, Arlyn '53 Yonkers, N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Chase, Phyllis Bradford . '53 Brockton, Mass. Westbrook Junior College 

Christman, Joan Mary '53 Scotia, N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Coates, Margaret E. '51 Plainfield, N. J. Wilson College 

Cody, Jane P. '53 Arlington, Mass. Pembroke College 

Conway, Ronnie '51 East Hampton, N. Y. Elmira College 

Courtright, Nancy Marie ... '52 River Edge, N. J. Tenn. Wesleyan Jr. Coll. 

Coviello, Carolyn '51 Pleasantville, N. Y. Good Counsel College 

Daltry, Alice Marshall '53 Middletown, Conn. Vassar College 

Davenport, Joan '52 Amherst, Mass. Goucher College 

Delcoff, Gloria Jean '52 Cincinnati, Ohio University of Cincinnati 

Dervinis, Aldona Beatrice ...'53 Plymouth, Pa. Wilkes College 

Devine, Patricia M. '52 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Dobson, Betty Lou '52 Elmhurst, N. Y. Packer Collegiate Institute 

Dorn, Ruth Elizabeth '52 Souderton, Pa. Temple University 

Dulin, Jean '51 Fly Creek, N. Y. Cornell University 

Duncan, Elizabeth Ann ....'53 La Grange, 111. Cornell College (Iowa) 

Dye, Julianne '51 Rochester, N. Y. Stephens College 

Elliot, F. Eileen '51 Tenafly, N. J. Keuka College 

Ernest, Ruth '51 Bath, Pa. Temple University 

Evans, Jane B. '52 Penn Valley, Pa. Colby Junior College 

Farrell, Jean Emily '52 Roselle, N. J. Mt. St. Agnes College 

Feitner, Betty '51 Montclair, N. J. Green Mt. Junior College 

Ford, Jean Gretchen '51 Newton, N. J. Elmira College 

Forman, Barbara '53 Brooklyn, N. Y. Hofstra College 

Forney, Anne Johnson '52 Westport, Conn. U. of North Carolina 

Freyer, Ann '53 Cornwall-on-Hudson,N.Y. McGill University 

Gallert, Anna Mae '51 Deep Water, N. J. Concordia Collegiate Inst. 

Garcia, Rose Margaret ...'53 Miami, Fla. Florida State University 

Gear, Betty Lou '53 Elmira, N. Y. Elmira College 

Gerhold, Vivian '51 Sidney, Ohio Cornell University 

* Including those graduating in September, 1951, but not those entering at that time. 

46 



Name Class 

Goldman, Lillian '52 

Goldstein, Marilyn Joyce ....'52 

Goostray, Jane Anne '52 

Greenberg, Pearl '53 

Greisen, Claire Anne '52 

Greus, Ruth Lillian '53 

Grinwis, Helen May '52 

Gritzke, Lois Katherine....'52 

Grove, Jane Lee '53 

Hale, Dorothy '51 

Haley, Madeline '51 

Hammer, Sheila '53 

Hartvigsen, Lois M. '53 

High, Carol B. '53 

Ho, Edna Yuk Lin '52 

Holden, Susanne T. '51 

Holland, Joan '53 

Holland, Judith '53 

Hollingshead, Mary Allyn '53 
Holmes, Elizabeth DuPeza '52 
Hopkins, Janice Elizabeth .'53 
Hubbard, Nancy Kathleen .'52 

Hunter, Anne Elinore '53 

Jackson, Dorothea Elsa ....'53 

Johnson, Marie G. '52 

Jones, Catharine B. '52 

Jordan, Mary Elizabeth ....'52 

Kaul, Elizabeth M. '53 

Kawaguchi, Toshive '53 

Keagle, Marion Nancy '52 

Knowlton, Ann Witherbee '52 

Kobrick, Dolores Ann '53 

Kornegay, Elva Alice '52 

Kozma, Constance '51 

Lagerquist, Elaine '51 

Lee, Carol '51 

Liebenau, Irene Ada '53 

Lucker, Jean Brehmer '53 

Manning, Helen Louise ....'52 
Martin, Mary Chandler '52 
McCabe, Ann Marie Clare . '53 

McCarty, Joan '51 

McCormack, Jean Clair . '52 
Mclntyre, Janet Louise '53 
McKaig, Doris Marguerite '52 
McKeown, Ann M. '51 

Menzel, Joan Louise '53 

Miller, Phyllis M. '51 

Mohr, Jean Henderson ....'51 
Mohr, Wanda Katherine ....'52 

Morrison, Peggy Ann '53 

Mulherin, Virginia Ann ....'52 

Mutch, Elizabeth A. '53 

Naranjo, Maria Teresa '53 

Nein, Janet Louise '52 

Nelson, Carole Ann '53 



STUDENTS 

Home 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Watertown, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Elmsford, N. Y. 
Maplewood, N. J. 
Clifton, N. J. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Portland, Conn. 
Chicago, 111. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Scotch Plains, N. J. 
Reading, Pa. 
Honolulu, Hawaii 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Summit, N. J. 
Summit, N. J. 
Longmeadow, Mass. 
Patchogue, N. Y. 
Williamsville, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Hopewell Junction, N. Y. 
Farmington, Me. 
Richmond, Indiana 
South China, Maine 
Wyandotte, Mich. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Olean, N. Y. 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Hazelton, Pa. 
Seven Springs, N. C. 
Ridge wood, N. J. 
Watertown, Conn. 
Baldwin, N. Y. 
New London, Conn. 
Eggertsville, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Scranton, Pa. 
New Philadelphia, Ohio 
Bayonne, N. J. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Jordan, N. Y. 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
East Orange, N. J. 
Jackson, Minn. 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Morristown, N. J. 
Quito, Ecuador 
Westfield, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 



47 

From 
Hunter College 
University of Connecticut 
Simmons College 
Brooklyn College 
Good Counsel College 
Green Mt. Junior College 
New Jersey College 

for Women 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Bradford Junior College 
Colby Junior College 
University of Illinois 
University of Connecticut 
Cornell University 
Ursinus College 
University of Hawaii 
College of St. Elizabeth 
Drew University 
Drew University 
Cornell University 
Hofstra College 
Cornell University 
University of Maine 
Upsala College 
Russell Sage College 
University of Maine 
Swarthmore College 
University of Maine 
Hofstra College 
U.C.L.A. 

Westminster College 
College of St. Theresa 
Pennsylvania State College 
Wake Forest College 
Furman University 
Russell Sage College 
Cornell University 
University' of Connecticut 
Elmira College 
Wilson College 
Duke University 
Marywood College 
Ohio University 
College of New Rochelle 
Pembroke College 
Elmira College 
Hunter College 
Hunter College 
Cedar Crest College 
Ripon College 
Macalester College 
Green Mt. Junior College 
Marywood College 
Bryn Mawr College 
University of Washington 
Pembroke College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 



48 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Class Home 

Osterheld, Joanne Gould '53 Palmer, Mass. 

Parsons, Sara Elizabeth '53 Amagansett, N. Y. 

Perrigo, Janet Medston ..'53 Hallowall, Me. 

Peterson, Blanche Marie .'53 Cambridge, Mass. 

Pollens, Janet '52 New York, N. Y. 

Rahmer, Ann Elizabeth ...'53 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Reif, Lillian Hughston ... '52 Spartanburg, S. C. 

Riker, Joan '51 Plandome, N. Y. 

Robinson, Eleanor Pulley ... .'52 Westfield, N. J. 

Salvati, Phyllis Jean '53 Westfield, N. J. 

Sater, Anita '52 Long Island City, N. Y. 

Savage, Patricia '52 Randolph, Vt. 

Schick, Barbara Helen ....'53 Milford, N. J. 

Schipman, Barbara '53 Las Cruces, N. M. 

Schlitt, Merylin Anne '52 Darien, Conn. 

Schmitz, Anna '51 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Schultz, Alma E. '51 Washington, D. C. 

Schultz, Arlene Lois '52 New York, N. Y. 

Scott, Marilyn Elizabeth . '53 Rochester, N. Y. 

Seiler, Elizabeth '51 Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Sheldon, Alice Louise '52 Kingston, N. Y. 

Sieber, Alice L. '51 Frederic, Wis. 

Sifry, Rhoda '51 New York, N. Y. 

Simmons, Patricia Marie .'52 Bucksport, Me. 

Simon, Marga I. '53 Schenectady, N. Y. 

Skidmore, Sally Louise '52 Staten Island, N. Y. 

Sparrell, Katherine '53 Larchmont, N. Y. 

Steel, Emmajean '52 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Stein, Caryl Jeanne '52 Manhasset, N. Y. 

Storandt, Jo Ellen '51 Middletown, Conn. 

Stover, Virginia '51 Erwinna, Pa. 

Svendsen, Elsie '51 Bellerose, N. Y. 

Sweeney, Claire Louise '51 Middletown, N. Y. 

Teeter, Martha Ann '53 Elmira, N. Y. 

Thorn, Elizabeth P. '52 Princeton, N. J. 

Thomas, Barbara Joan ....'53 Larchmont, N. Y. 

Thompson, Jean E. '52 Elmira, N. Y. 

Tynan, Eleanor Mary '52 Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Vander, Evelyn M. '52 New York, N. Y. 

Vosgian, Dorothy Jean ....'53 Hartford, Conn. 

Warner, Gloria Agnes ....'53 Calverton, N. Y. 

Watkins, Marilyn Jean '53 Elmira, N. Y. 

Weller, Martha Louise '52 Bronxville, N. Y. 

White, Marion Carolyn ....'53 Oyster Bay, N. Y. 

Whitnah, Ruth Lyndon ....'53 Manhattan, Kansas 

Whittemore, Patricia '52 Portland, Me. 

Willis, Elaine Janette '53 Brewster, N. Y. 

Wilson, Nancy '52 Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Wilson, Patience '51 Rowayton, Conn. 

Wohlberg, Ilene Myrle '52 Teaneck, N. J. 

Woodlock, Marion E. '52 New York, N. Y. 

Youmans, Margaret Ann. ...'53 Upper Montclair, N. J. 



From 
Bates College 
Cornell University 
Colby College 
St. Mary-of-the-Woods 

College 
Hunter College 
College of New Rochelle 
Limestone College 
Marymount College 
Russell Sage College 
Hood College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Russell Sage College 
New Jersey College 

for Women 
N. M. College of A.&M.A. 
Mt. St. Agnes College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Russell Sage College 
Brooklyn College 
Elmira College 
Green Mt. Junior College 
Bethany College 
Macalester College 
Hunter College 
University of Maine 
Syracuse University 
Cornell University 
Centenary Junior College 
Cornell University 
Elmira College 
Macalester College 
U. of North Carolina 
Luther College 
Cornell University 
Elmira College 
New Jersey College 

for Women 
College of Mt. St. Vincent 
Elmira College 
Western College for 

Women 
New York University 
Wheaton College, (111.) 
Lasell Junior College 
Russell Sage College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Wheaton College, (111.) 
Westbrook Junior College 
Cornell University 
Pa. College for Women 
Jr. College of Conn. 
New Jersey College 

for Women 
Hunter College 
Rosemont College 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 



Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

525 East 68th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information 
which will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing 
school entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or expected 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19 

Please send me an application blank (check if desired) 

(See page 13 regarding when to request.) 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to Cornell University (or "I give and 
bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital") the 

sum of | for the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift shall be made in whole or in part 
for any specific purpose in the program of the School of 
Nursing such use may be specified. 



Index 



Absences, 19 

Accreditation of the school, 5 

Activities, 20; Nurses' Residence, 20; 
Alumnae Association, 22; recreation, 
20; marriage and residence, 21-22; 
school government, 21; counseling 
services, 22 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
35-45 

Admission, requirements for, 11; appli- 
cation for, 13; age and health re- 
quirements, 11; credit requirements, 
12; educational requisites, 11 

Advanced standing, 14 

Aim of school, 5 

Alumnae Association, 22, 37; Irene Sut- 
liffe Fund, 17 

Anatomy, 24, 27 

Application for admission, 13 

Assistant professors, 39 

Assistants in instruction, 42-43 

Associate professors, 38 

Associated with the faculty, 42-45 

iasic nursing program, 23; professional 

curriculum, 23 
iequest, form of, 49 
biochemistry, 24, 27 
iiological and physical sciences, 27 

Calendar, 3 
areer opportunities in nursing, 4 

"links, 8-9 

Committee for Scholarships, 17, 37 

ommunicable disease nursing, 24, 31 

Contents, 2 

Cornell University, 7; degree, 14; ad- 
visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
dents, 37; Medical College faculty, 
42 

Council of the School, 35 

Counseling services, 22 



Courses, description of, 27-34 
Credit requirements, 12 
Curriculum, professional, 23; first year, 
24; second year, 25; third year, 26 

Degree, 14 

Description of courses, 27-34 

Development of Behavior in Children, 
25, 33 

Diet Therapy, 24, 25, 30 

Diploma, 14 

Division of Child Development, De- 
partment of Pediatrics, 25, 45 

Educational requisites, 11 
Emeritus professors, 38 
Executive faculty, 36 
Expenses, 15 

Facilities for instruction, 8-10 

Faculty, 38-42; associated with, 42-45, 
committees of, 36 

Faculty instructors, 39-42 

Family and Community Health, 26, 28 

Fees and expenses, 15; method of pay- 
ment, 16 

Financial aid, 17-18 

Graduation, 13, 14; advanced standing, 
14; degree and diploma, 14 

Head nurses, 44, 45 
Health service, 18-19 
History of school, 6-7 
History of Nursing, 25, 28 

Joint Administrative Board, 35 

Lecturers, 44 
Libraries, 8 
Loan fund, 17 

Maintenance, 16 

Marriage, 21 

Medical Nursing, 24, 26, 30, 31 



51 



52 INDEX 

Medicine, 24, 30 
Microbiology, 24, 27 

New York Hospital, 6-9; nursing super- 
visors, 44; head nurses, 44-45; staff, 
44-45 

Nurses' Residence, 8, 20-21 

Nursing and allied arts — general, 29; 
Nursing Arts I, 24, 29; Nursing Arts 
II, 24, 29 

Nutrition, 30; department of, 45; Nu- 
trition and Cookery, 24, 30 

Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing, 
25, 32; Obstetrics and Gynecology, 
25, 32 

Officers of administration, 36 

Operating Room Nursing, 25, 32 

Orientation, 24, 29 

Out-Patient Department, 9, 25-26 

Out-Patient Nursing 26, 29 

Pathology, 24, 27 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9, 45 

Pediatric Nursing; 25, 33; pediatrics, 

25, 33 
Personality Growth and Development, 

24, 28 
Pharmacology I, 24, 29; Pharmacology 

II, 24, 29 
Physical Education, 24, 25, 27 
Physiology, 24, 27 
Private Patient Nursing, 26, 31 
Professional Adjustments I, 24, 28 
Professional Adjustments II, 26, 28 
Professors, 38 
Program, basic nursing, 23 



Promotion and graduation, 13-14; se. 

Advanced standing, Degree, Diplom; 
Psychiatric Nursing, 26, 33-34; psychia 

try, 26, 33 
Public health affiliations, 10, 23, 26 
Public Health Nursing, 28-29 

Recreational facilities, 20-21 
Registration, State, 5-6 
Residence and marriage, 21-22 

Scholarships, 17-18 

School government, 21 

School of Nursing, administrative of 

fleers, 36; faculty committees, 36 
Social and Health Aspects of Nursing 

24, 28 
Social Sciences, 28 
Social Service Departments, 10, 45 
State registration, 5-6 
Student life and activities, 20-22 
Students now in school, 46-48 
Supervisors, nursing, 44 
Surgical Nursing, 24, 26, 31-32; Surgery 

24, 31 

Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 15 

Uniforms, 15; see also Maintenano 
Urological Nursing, 26, 32 

Vacations, 19 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York 
10, 26, 45 

Ward Activities and Relationships, 26 
30 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



JULY 29, 1952 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1952-53 SESSIONS 



Term Dates 1952-53 



Classes of 1953 and 1954: 

Sept. 29, 1952 — Jan. 18, 1953 

Jan. 19, 1953 — May 10, 1953 

May 11, 1953 — Sept. 27, 1953 

Sept. 28, 1953 — Jan. 17, 1954 

Classes of 1955: 

Sept. 29, 1952 — March 22, 1953 (Pre-clinical Unit) 

March 23, 1953 — June 14, 1953 

June 15, 1953 — Sept. 27, 1953 

Sept. 28, 1953 — Dec. 20, 1953 

Dec. 21, 1953 — March 14, 1954 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of 
New York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from 
York Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is reached most easily through the main 
entrance of the Hospital on East 68th Street (east of York Ave- 
nue) . The Nurses Residence is at the corner of York Avenue and 
70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus, M-7, east-bound, runs to the 
Medical Center. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 44. July 29, 1952. Number 3. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1952-1953 

525 EAST 68TH STREET, NEW YORK 21, N.Y. 



Contents 



Calendar 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim of the School 5 

Accreditation of School 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History 6 

Facilities for Instruction 8 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 10 

Fees and Expenses 15 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 17 

Health Service 18 

Vacations and Absences 19 

Student Life and Activities 20 

Basic Nursing Program 23 

Description of Courses 27 

Administration 35 

Faculty 38 

Associated with the Faculty 42 

Students in the School 46 

Form of Bequest 50 

Index 51 



Picture Credits: 
Ben Greenhaus, Anthony Lanza, Paul Parker 



Calendar 



1952 

Registration for Freshmen students 

Commencement 

Holiday: for Columbus Day 

Holiday: Presidential Election 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 
Dec. 24 Wednesday Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 
Dec. 25 Thursday Holiday: Christmas Day 



Sept. 27 Saturday 
Sept. 30 Tuesday 
Oct. 13 Monday 
Nov. 4 Tuesday 
Nov. 27 Thursday 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
May 

July 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
May 

July 



1953 

1 Thursday Holiday: New Year's Day 

4 Sunday Last Day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

12 Thursday Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 

23 Monday Holiday: for Washington's Birthday 

30 Saturday Holiday: Memorial Day 

4 Saturday Holiday: Independence Day 
7 Monday Holiday: Labor Day 

26 Saturday Registration of Freshmen students 

29 Tuesday Commencement 

12 Monday Holiday: Columbus Day 

26 Thursday Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

24 Thursday Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 

25 Friday Holiday: Christmas Day 

1954 

1 Friday Holiday: New Year's Day 

3 Sunday Last Day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

12 Friday Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 

22 Monday Holiday: Washington's Birthday 

31 Monday Holiday: for Memorial Day 

5 Monday Holiday: for Independence Day 



Career Opportunities in Nursing 

Nursing is recognized as one of the vital health services of the world 
and the well-prepared young woman faces a broad challenge. As a 
group, nurses constitute one of the largest single professional bodies 
of women in this country. With over 300,000 now practicing, their 
numbers are greater than ever before and it has been estimated that 
400,000 nurses will be needed by 1954. 

The scope of activity of the modern professional nurse grows wider 
as the field of the health services broadens. The many advances in 
general and medical science are making available not only new and 
improved treatment of illness but also means by which sickness may 
be avoided and optimum health enjoyed. In the accomplishment of 
these advances, the professional nurse stands shoulder to shoulder 
with the doctor and by his side she helps, through the practice of her 
particular skills, to bring to thousands of individuals the benefits of 
this new knowledge. 

Modern therapeutic procedures have become increasingly complex 
and in addition, there is greater understanding of the ways in which 
health is affected by the environment and by the individual's relation- 
ships with other people. 

These facts make it necessary for the effective nurse to be a person 
who is herself well-adjusted and professionally prepared in the broad- 
est sense of the word. She must not only possess manual dexterity 
based on sound scientific knowledge, but must have an understanding 
of human behavior and of the many social and economic problems 
of the world in which we live. 

Graduate nurses are active in local, state, and national public health 
agencies, in hospitals, schools, industry, and innumerable other situa- 
tions where health service and health instruction are needed. Like 
other professional practitioners, the nurse often prepared herself as a 
specialist in one of the clinical fields such as psychiatry, pediatrics, oi 
obstetrics. 

A sound preparation in a good basic program is the most impor 
tant first step toward a successful and satisfying career in nursing 
This provides a firm foundation upon which to build for increasing 
activities and responsibilities. 



The Aim of the School 



Inherent in the philosophy upon which the program of the School 
is based is the belief that the development of the student herself 
into a well-integrated and responsible individual is basic to all other 
objectives. In the selection of students, effort is made to choose those 
whose personality, education and interests would seem to make them 
able to profit most from the experiences offered. Each is assisted in 
becoming cognizant of the world in which she lives, of the needs and 
desires of people, and of the ways in which these may affect emotional 
■ and physical well-being. 

It is the aim of the school to prepare a graduate who will be a 
qualified practitioner of nursing in beginning positions in hospitals, 
public health agencies and the many other situations where profes- 
sional nursing service is needed. 



en 



Accreditation of School 



This school is accredited by the National Nursing Accrediting 
Service as one of the few schools which prepare students for beginning 
positions in public health nursing in addition to preparing them for 
practice in hospitals and in other fields of nursing. It is an active 
member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing and is, 
of course, accredited by the New York State Department of Education. 



State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates are eligible for admission to the examination for licensure 
administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are expected 
to take the first examination given after completion of the nursing 
course. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the gradu- 
ate of the school as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

York. Having become registered in New York State, it is possible 
to apply for registration without examination in other states. In 
New York State, citizenship, or declared intention of becoming a 
citizen, is required. If citizenship is not completed within seven years 
from the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

The New York State Nurse Practice Act states that a nurse must be 
licensed by examination in the state in which she was graduated. For 
this reason, graduates of this school are urged to take State Board ex- 
aminations in New York State rather than in another state as they 
may wish to practice in New York State at a future date. 



History 



This School of Nursing is one of the first to be founded in the 
United States; this year it celebrates its seventy-fifth anniversary. As 
early as 1799, Dr. Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent 
physician, organized a series of lectures for nurses combined with a 
course of practical instruction on the wards. Although the theoretical 
content was meager and the practical instruction not systematically 
planned, these classes focused attention on the fact that women who 
had some preparation for their work gave better care to patients than 
those without instruction. Each year the program was amplified and 
in 1877 a formal training school for nurses was established "to consist 
of one teacher and 24 pupils." 

GROWTH OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

The school was for many years an integral part of The New York 
Hospital, the second oldest hospital in America maintained by private 
endowment. George the Third of England granted the Hospital its 
charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title of The 
Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. This title 
was changed in 1810 to the present one of The Society of the New 
York Hospital. While its roots extend far into the past, the Hospital 
has consistently been sensitive and responsive to the changing needs of 
the community and to the progress of science. One evidence of this has 
been the gradual increase in the functions and size of the institution 
which has necessitated expansion and re-location to correspond with 
the growth of the city and with the increasing scope of knowledge 
related to health. The present site and buildings are the third it 
has occupied. 



HISTORY OF SCHOOL 7 

SCHOOL BECOMES PART OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

The program and organization of the School of Nursing has grown 
and changed to keep pace with the health needs of society. The first 
course was eighteen months in length. After thirteen years this was in- 
creased to twenty-four months and in 1896 to three years. It was fitting 
that in 1942, on the 65th anniversary of the founding of the school, it 
should have become a part of Cornell University, thus making avail- 
able the resources of two great institutions, each of which has a long 
history and a notable record of achievement in the fields of education 
and public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
Government's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
under the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object 
shall be ... to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a re- 
markable system of higher education. However, it received its greatest 
impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under 
the influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first 
president, determined the form of the new University. In 1864, an 
agreement was reached with the legislature of New York State which 
resulted in the founding of "a University of a new type ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study." This com- 
bination of federal, state and private interests and resources is unique. 
It gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policies 
of the University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 
One field of service after another has found preparation for its 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an association 
between the Cornell University Medical College and The New York 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the two 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructed 
buildings of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the 
East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for nursing was 
first brought under the auspices of the University in July, 1942, when, 
by agreement between the Trustees of the University and the Gover- 
nors of The New York Hospital, the School of Nursing, long con- 
ducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made a school 
within the University. 



:o 



Facilities for Instruction 



Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the 
nursing school. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, 
laboratories and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching i 
unit on the second floor of the Nurses' Residence while others are pro- 
vided in the Hospital and in the Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all the 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various community 
agencies of the city. 

LIBRARIES 

The library of the school contains a wide selection of materials on 
nursing and related fields, including complete sets of important 
medical and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. It is under the 
direction of a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library of 
the medical college are readily accessible and supplement those of the 
nursing school in such a way as to make available unusual resources to 
both the students and faculty of the school. A librarian is in attendance 
in both libraries. Additional small libraries are adjacent to the nursing 
conference rooms on the Hospital floors in all departments. Through 
the New York Public Library, valuable supplementary materials are 
placed at the disposal of instructors and students as needed. 

WIDE EXPERIENCE IN CLINICAL SERVICES 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsurpassed 
for the care and study of patients. The Hospital is comprised of five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both 
in-patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching 
and for the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized 
clinical services are therefore available which are seldom found within 
a single organization. The Hospital has a capacity of over 1,100 beds 
and during the past year 27,182 patients were admitted, exclusive of 
newborns. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives 
the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the 
part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. 
Authenticity of the findings in such studies depends in no small degree 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 9 

on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the special- 
ties of communicable disease (including tuberculosis) , medical neu- 
rology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat disorders, ortho- 
pedic, plastic and neuro-surgery, and ophthalmology. The Woman's 
Clinic has a capacity of 207 adults and 112 newborns and provides 
for obstetric and gynecologic patients. During the past year 4,272 
babies were born in this clinic. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 95 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children and the services 
of a play therapist offer opportunities for the student of nursing to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick 
children. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the 
student works with and observes the development of the normal child, 
and is thus better able to evaluate deviations from the normal which 
may accompany illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity 
of 109 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational 
and recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of the 
mentally ill. The close connection between the psychiatric medical 
and nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a 
consultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the 
relationship between mental and physical illness throughout her ex- 
perience in the Hospital. 

OUT-PATIENT SERVICES 

The Out-Patient Department provides excellent opportunity for the 
study of patients who are treated without being admitted to the Hos- 
pital. Last year there were 259,103 visits to this Department. Oppor- 
tunity is provided for participation in the instruction and guidance 
of expectant mothers through mothers' classes, family studies, and 
nutrition conferences. Students assist with various aspects of the treat- 
ment, referrals for home care and many other activities related to 
the care of patients coming to the Out-Patient Department. 



10 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SUPERVISED FIELD INSTRUCTION IN 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

Experience in the health teaching and in the nursing care of 
patients in their homes is afforded through cooperation with the 
Visiting Nurse Service of New York and other community agencies. 
An additional eight-week experience is available to a limited number 
of students in the senior year through arrangement with the New 
York State Department of Health. Students with good scholastic 
records and a definite interest in public health nursing as a career 
are given preference among those who request this latter experience. 

Members of the staff of the New York City Department of Health 
plan with the faculty of this school for appropriate observations and 
conferences related to the community health program. This planning 
includes the Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center which serves the 
community in which The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center 
is located. 



Requirements for 
Admission and Graduation 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students enter the School of Nursing on the recommendation 
of the faculty Committee on Admissions which reviews all applica- « 
tions. Since nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who 
have a deep interest in public service, those candidates are selected 
whose credentials indicate high rank in scholarship, personal fitness 
for nursing, maturity, and good general health. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifica- 
tions, there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is ex- 
pected that applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. 
The results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a 
dental examination must be submitted at the time of application. 
Inoculation against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox 
will be required of all students before admission to the school. 



EDUCATIONAL REQUISITES 

The minimum educational requisites for admission are satisfactory 
completion of at least two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive 
of physical education) . The applicant may take this college work at 
Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, or at any university or senior 
or junior college accredited by one of the regional associations of 
colleges and secondary schools. 

When transfer to this school is anticipated, it is preferable for 
the first two years of college work to be part of a program in Liberal 
Arts or Home Economics rather than one designated as "Nursing" or 
"Pre-Nursing". Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca 
should confer with their advisers in whatever college they may be 
registered. These faculty members will be glad to assist in planning 
a desirable program. 

Because the work of the nurse requires that she have an understand- 
ing of human reactions and of social factors influencing community 
development, that she be able to express herself well and participate in 
community planning for nursing services, it is important that she 
obtain a sound background in history, psychology and other social 
sciences, as well as in literature and English. With the exception of 
psychology, indicated below, specific requirements in these subjects 
are not laid down because a variety of satisfactory combinations can 
be accepted. 

Physical and biological sciences are important in the preparation for 
admission, but should not be taken at the expense of the subjects re- 
ferred to above. Obviously, the young woman who can devote more 
than two years to her liberal arts preparation has more leeway to in- 
clude several science courses in her college work as well as further 
general academic courses. Unquestionably this would be desirable in 
preparation for many positions in the field of nursing. 

In addition to the academic and health requirements, consideration 
will be given to evidences of the applicant's personal fitness for 
nursing. 

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

Within the two-year liberal arts program required for admission, 
indicated above, the only specific requirements are as follows: 

Semester Hrs. Credit 
Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

11 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Human Anatomy, Physiology and Bacteriology are not accepted 
as fulfilling the 6-hour credit required in biological science as 
these are included in the professional program. 
Not more than 12 hours of biological science will be counted to- 
ward meeting the 60 credit hours required for admission. 

In general, the principle applies that those courses given within the 
School of Nursing cannot be credited toward meeting admission re- 
quirements, because there is no allowance within the professional cur- 
riculum for electives. 

It is suggested that you take this bulletin with you each time you 
register for your program in your first two years of college, and show 
this section to your adviser, who will help you in selection of courses 
to meet these requirements. Applicants who do not meet in full the 
specific subject requirements for admission, but who have a good 
record of two or more years of college, are encouraged to communicate 
with the Dean of the School of Nursing for consideration of the credits 
which can be offered. Assistance can also be given in arranging plans 
for taking required subjects in summer session. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the 
form at the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain 
psychometric tests are required before admission. The applicant is 
asked to meet the charge of $5. '00 for these tests. 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the appli- 
cation procedure. Effort is made to have the applicant meet with a 
member of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. 
If this is not practicable a conference can often be arranged with an 
alumna or other qualified person living in the vicinity of the 
applicant's home or college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the school as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible edu- 
cational background preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal applica- 
tion should be made during the first term of the first college year 
if the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college year. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 13 

When all application forms are received, including the report of the 
psychometric test and a transcript covering the first year of college 
work, and these appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted 
pending satisfactory fulfillment of all remaining requirements. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon 
notification of this provisional acceptance to the school. This assures 
that a place will be held for her in the entering class, pending satis- 
factory completion of all admission prerequisites. The full amount 
is credited toward fees payable at registration, but the deposit is not 
refundable if the applicant does not register. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 
PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 



The established system of grading is a scale of F to A, with D as 
the lowest passing grade. An average of C for each term is required 
for promotion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
courses Nursing Arts I, Nursing Arts II, Pharmacology I. A grade be- 
low C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which 
is less than G places a student on condition. This must be removed 
by the end of the next term to insure further promotion. A student 

on condition must observe certain limitations in relation to her social 

* . . . 
activities. 



A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the 
judgment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she 
can complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable length of 
time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, 
in which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the 
instructor, if the course is available. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the 
| student to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory 
to it. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a 
Promotion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice 
and her relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into ac- 
count. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her 



14 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

work or who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the 
qualifications which are important for a good nurse may be put on 
condition or asked to withdraw from the school. The school reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of 
the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for nursing. The student is kept informed of her progress 
through frequent reports and individual term conferences, and every 
effort is made to provide assistance and guidance which will help her 
succeed in the school. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The Society of 
the New York Hospital. In order to qualify for the degree and diploma, 
the student must maintain a cumulative average of C for the three- 
year program, and must have completed satisfactorily all of the theory 
and practice outlined in this catalogue. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before admis- 
sion may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience. An 
exemption may be granted up to a maximum of 16 weeks. An average 
of B in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for 
favorable consideration. Exemption must be requested at the begin- 
ning of the last term of the second year. 



n 



Fees and Expenses 



Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as follows: 

First Second Third 

FEES Year Year Year Total 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 200.00 $150.00 $100.00 450.00 

Public Health Affiliation** 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 3.00 3.00 3.00 9.00 

Health Service 12.00 12.00 12.00 36.00 

Hospitalization Insurance* 9.60 9.60 

Dental Service 4.00 4.00 

Graduation 25.00 25.00 

Student Organization 5.25 5.25 5.25 15.75 

$273.85 $170.25 $205.25 $649.35 



:. 



OTHER EXPENSES (Subject to variation) 

.. Aprons and accessories of uniforms $ 40.36 

Uniform shoes 12.97 

Uniform sweater 5.50 

Uniform cape (optional) 21.75 

Gymnasium suit 10.00 

Books, keys, bandage scissors, and 

miscellaneous (approx.) 50.00 



Rental laboratory coat 

Rental public health uniforms 

Miscellaneous expenses in connection 
with field trips, etc. 



♦TOTAL FEES AND EXPENSES 



1.00 



2.00 

$143.58 
$417.43 



$ 6.00 



2.00 

$ 8.00 
$178.25 



$ 12.97 



6.00 

5.00 

30.00 

$ 53.97 
$259.22 



$ 40.36 

25.94 

5.50 

21.75 

10.00 

62.00 
1.00 
5.00 

34.00 

$205.55 
$854.90 



•Total cost of hospitalization insurance (Associated Hospital Service-Blue Cross) is $19-20 
a year. Half is paid by the New York Hospital and half by the student. 

* * For those few senior students who are granted an additional elective experience of eight 
weeks with the N. Y. State Department of Health, there is an additional expense of approxi- 
mately $260.00. 



15 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon tentative acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is 
required. This is credited toward the tuition for the first year but is 
not refundable if the application is withdrawn. The remainder of 
the $200.00 tuition, amounting to $175.00, is payable at registration. 
All other first year fees are also payable on registration day. 

Students will be billed in advance for second and third year fees 
which become due on the first day of the Fall term of each year. These 
fees must be paid not later than twenty days after the date they are 
due. An exception is the fee for graduation which is due on the first day 
of the Summer term in the third year and is payable within twenty 
days of that date. This fee is refundable if the student is not graduated. 
The Student Organization fee is payable to the class treasurer. All 
fees and expenses incurred during the program must be paid before 
graduation. 

The school reserves the right to change its tuition and fees in 
amount, time, and manner of payment at any time without notice. 

None of the articles listed under ''Other Expenses" should be ob- 
tained before admission to the school. Uniform accessories, shoes, and 
sweater will be ordered after registration and are paid for upon de- 
livery. Estimated expenses for books as listed include approximately 
$10.00 for optional purchases. A list of necessary personal equipment 
and the fees payable on registration day will be sent to each student 
shortly before registration day. 

MAINTENANCE 

Each student receives maintenance consisting of room, a reasonable 
amount of laundry, and a cash allowance of $22.40 each two weeks. 
No allowance for maintenance is provided during the eight-week elec- 
tive with the New York State Department of Health and no allowance 
for meals or laundry is provided during vacations. The uniform dresses 
and caps are provided without charge. These remain the property of 
the School and are returned on graduation or withdrawal. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 

FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Committee for Scholarships of the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, a women's committee interested in 
the School, makes available a fund from which scholarships and grants- 
in-aid are awarded each year, usually in amounts of $100, $200, and 
$300. These scholarships are open to both entering students and 
students already in the school when need is a factor. They are awarded 
on the basis of the student's all-round record as indicated by academic 
work, participation in school and community activities, and qualities 
indicating promise of growth and a contribution to nursing. 

Application is made to the Dean. For entering students, application 
is made at the time of application for admission to the school, and 
grants are made on recommendation of the Admissions Committee. 
Awards are regarded as final only after the student has enrolled. Stu- 
dents already in the school should make application not later than 
May 15 for grants to be used in the following school year. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

Loans are available through this fund after the first term in the 
school for students who are in need of financial aid. Applications are 
made to the Dean and are accepted at any time. However, students 
are encouraged to plan as far as possible in the Spring for the follow- 
ing school year and to place applications by May 15. 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the school 
and in honor of Irene Sutliffe '80, Director of the school, 1886 to 
1902, scholarship grants are available to graduates of the school for 
post-graduate study. They are granted primarily to alumnae who are 
qualifying for positions connected with the School of Nursing. 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
A few scholarships are available from this fund, primarily for gradu- 
ate nurses. 

LOUISA WARDNER SCUDDER FUND 
Income from this fund, given in memory of Mary E. Golden, a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1878, the first class in the school, is for student 
recreation or needed rest. 

17 



18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

# # # * * 

For information on scholarships and grants-in-aid available to 
students taking their first two years of academic work at Cornell in 
Ithaca, write to Scholarship Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell 
University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

The following three scholarships are available to residents of 
New York State, making application while in high school: 

STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and aca- 
demies. Annual award $350 for each of four years while in attendance 
in any approved college in the State. This scholarship may therefore 
be used for the first two years of college required for admission to the 
School of Nursing, and continues for the first two years in the School 
of Nursing. Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local 
high school principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE WAR ORPHANS SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents 
of New York State who are graduates of its common schools and 
academies and who are children of deceased or disabled veterans of 
World War I. Annual award $350 towards tuition plus $100 for main- 
tenance for each of four years while in attendance in any approved 
college in the State. This scholarship may therefore be used for the 
first two years of college required for admission to the School of 
Nursing and continues for the first two years in the School of Nursing. 
Awarded on the basis of Regents examinations under regulations of 
the State Education Department. Apply to local high school principal, 
or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE CORNELL SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and aca- 
demies. Annual award $200 reduction in tuition for each of four 
years. This scholarship may be used by students who take the first 
two years of their academic work at Cornell in Ithaca and for the 
first two years in the School of Nursing. Awarded after a competi- 
tive examination. Apply to local high school principal, or to Com- 
missioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 



Health Service 



Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available to them a well-organized health service which is maintained 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 19 

under the general direction of a committee of the faculty and a school 
physician. Provision is also made for infirmary and hospital care. 

Upon admission to the school a physical examination by the school 
physician and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray 
is required every six months, and a physical examination during each 
school year. A Shick test is performed on all students after admission 
to the school; immunization to diphtheria is administered to those 
reacting positively. The Mantoux test is given during the pre-clinical 
period and, for those who are negative, is repeated at regular intervals. 
In addition, B.C.G. vaccine is provided to negative reactors. 

Beginning with the class admitted in the fall of 1952, students receive 
dental health service consisting of a full mouth series of X-rays, ex- 
amination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with suggestions for treat- 
ment, and follow-up supervision. For repair of dental defects, students 
are referred to their own dentists. 

A well-equipped infirmary is maintained in the Residence. Infirmary 
care is provided for short-term minor illness. For more serious illness, 
students are taken care of in The New York Hospital within the limits 
of the Hospital's policy on admissions and bed usage, and hospitaliza- 
tion up to the amount of eight weeks for any one admission is provided. 
Elective surgery for chronic remedial defects is not included and ex- 
penses for private nurses, transfusions and personal items are borne by 
the student. The school reserves the right to collect all hospitalization 
benefits available through third parties for any period of care coming 
within the provisions of these benefits. 

The fees for health service, dental service and hospitalization insur- 
ance are listed under school fees in this bulletin. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a stu- 
dent's health makes it unwise for her to remain in the school, she may 
be required to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any 
time. 

Vacations and Absences 

A vacation of four weeks is given each year. Students entering with 
a baccalaureate degree, who have an exemption of time, may have a 
slightly shorter vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged to 
conform to the requirements of the educational program but usually 
fall within the Summer months. 

As a result of absences, the repetition of a course of study or special 
examinations may be required, class registration may be changed and 
nursing practice may have to be made up. 



Student Life and Activities 



RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses' Residence, a sixteen-story fireproof 
building adjacent to the Hospital. Every effort has been made in the 
construction and equipment of the Residence to provide for the normal 
and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively fur- 
nished single rooms. All rooms have running water and each of the 
eight student floors is equipped with ample baths, showers, and toilet 
facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining 
kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

In addition to the lounges for informal and formal use, a large audi- 
torium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun roofs and a 
hobby room are also available for general use. Students who have had 
preparation in music are urged to keep up their interest and practice; 
pianos are available. Student activities planned jointly with the Cornell 
University Medical College are a regular part of the recreation and 
include glee club and dramatic productions. Programs are presented 
at intervals during the year. Students are hostesses at Open House on 
some Sunday evenings when friends are welcomed to games, conversa- 
tion, and refreshments. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach 
equipment and an outdoor grill are available. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 21 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of representatives of those living in the residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for 
friends and relatives at a nominal charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless 
in music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Com- 
mittee, students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities 
i as membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum 
of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The 
Blue Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships, the 
Christian Nurses' Fellowship and the Newman Club. Guest speakers 
and planned forums provide an opportunity for exchange of thought 
on many subjects. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule 
which is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all stu- 
dents. The Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, 
Judicial Council and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on 
Student Affairs acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organization 
and, with the Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings 
which provide for informal discussions of school activities and prob- 
lems. 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one 
or more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater 
problem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course 
or study, freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

is important. For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a 
student who is contemplating marriage during her period in the school 
to discuss her proposed plans with the Dean or her representative and 
to obtain permission to remain in the school. Permission is granted 
on an individual basis which takes into consideration the student's 
record of achevement, health, and other evidence of ability to carry 
her program with the additional responsibility of marriage. Likewise, 
a married student, if she so requests, will be given permission to live 
outside the Residence provided, in the judgment of the school, this 
will not interfere with her school responsibilities. The faculty record 
their belief that responsibility for maintaining the quality of her work 
and for her continuing participation in school activites must be 
accepted by the student. Married applicants are accepted if in the 
judgment of the Admissions Committee they meet these requirements. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The school maintains active counseling services which are available 
at all times to any student who needs assistance, either in connection 
with routine matters that may come up in her normal work in the 
school or in connection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that 
those students who need help on questions of educational program, 
finances, health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to 
those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for 
any student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase 
of her life while in the School of Nursing. 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION n 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national 
professional organization of nurses first known as the Nurses Associ- 
ated Alumnae of the United States and Canada, now the American 
Nurses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part 
of the Cornell University Alumni Association. 

One of the lounges of the residence is known as the Alumnae Room, 
and the alumnae meetings and many alumnae functions are held in 
this room. 



The Basic Nursing Program 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 11 and 12. 

Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry — (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects 45 

Total (Pre-Professional) 60 

PROFESSIONAL (3 years). In the School of Nursing. 

Semester Hours Credit 
1st yr. 2ndyr. Srdyr. 

Orientation (no credit) 

Physical Education (no credit) 

Biological Science 7.5 

Biochemical Science 3 

Social Science 4 4 3.5 

Nutrition 2 1 .5 

Pharmacology 2.5 

Nursing Arts 7.5 2 

Clinical Nursing 18 22 18.5 



Total (Professional) 44.5 27 24.5 96 

Grand Total {Required for B.S. in Nursing) 156 

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of three calendar years. 
In each clinical service, related classes, conferences, and bedside 
instructions are given concurrently with practice and emphasis is 
placed on disease prevention and health instruction. The student 
-eceives selected experiences in evening and night duty. An introduc- 
i tion to community nursing is provided through conferences and 
observation in various agencies assisting with health problems. The 
(student participates in discussions centering around family health 
and assists in the referral of patients requiring nursing care after 
lospital discharge. An eight-week period of supervised practice in 
:amily health service is provided through affiliation with the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York. 

The school reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum as 
:he need arises. The professional program of theory and experience 
follows. 



23 



24 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FIRST YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The first twenty-five weeks are devoted primarily to class and labora- 
tory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the 
pavilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at Christmas 
time. During the last half of the year the student is assigned to 
selected clinical departments for theory and practice. The services 
in which she has experience include, in addition to general medicine 
and general surgery, such specialties as ophthalmology, otolaryngology, 
neurology, and communicable disease. A vacation of three weeks is 
given in the last term. The following courses are taken: 

Course Class *Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Orientation 120 15 

Nursing Arts I 121 141 4.5 

Nursing Arts II 122 193 3 

Pharmacology I 124 15 0.5 

Pharmacology II 125 30 2 

Anatomy 100 60 2.5 

Physiology 101 45 2.5 

Biochemistry 102 60 3 

Microbiology 103 45 2 

Pathology 104 15 0.5 

Personality Growth and Development 110 15 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing Ill 30 2 

Professional Adjustments I 113 15 1 

Nutrition and Cookery 130 30 1 

Diet Therapy 131 30 1 

Medicine 140 32 2 

Communicable Diseases 141 13 1 

Principles of Medical Nursing (Including Com- 
municable Disease) 142 60 4 

Practice of Medical Nursing 143 12 3 

Surgery (Incl. specialties other than Urology) 150 30 2 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 151 45 3 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 152 12 3 

Physical Education 10 55 

Total 974 24 43.5 

•In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 25 

SECOND YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The second year is devoted to classes and practice in the Pediatric 
Clinic and Division of Child Development, the Woman's Clinic, and 
the Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Operating Room. There 
is a four-week vacation during the summer term. 

In the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development, the stu- 
dent has an opportunity for experience in the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment, Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor, and the 
unit for older children. In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for prac- 
tice include experience in the more traditional types of obstetrical 
service as well as activities which assist the student to become familiar 
with the newer concepts of maternal and new-born care which are 
embodied in such terms as "preparation for labor" and "rooming-in." 
The student's practice includes the Out-Patient Department, delivery 
floor, nursery and the postpartum unit. During the periods in the 
Departments of Medicine and Surgery, experience is provided in 
Diet Therapy practice and in Communicable Disease nursing. Eight 
weeks are spent in the Operating Room. Courses are as follows: 

Course Class *Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

History of Nursing 112 30 2 

Development of Behavior in Children 171 30 2 

Pediatrics 170 15 1 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 172 60 4 

•♦Practice of Pediatric Nursing 173 16 4 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 160 30 2 

Principles of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 161 45 3 

♦♦Practice of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 162 16 4 

Principles of Operating Room Nursing 156 15 1 

Practice of Operating Room Nursing 157 8 2 

Practice of Communicable Disease Nursing 144 4 1 

Practice of Diet Therapy 132 4 1 

Physical Education 10 32 

Total 257 48 27 

•In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 

_ * * Each student has two weeks of Out-Patient Department experience while in the Pediatric 
Service and four weeks of Out-Patient Department experience during her period in the 
Woman's Clinic. 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

• THIRD YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

In the third year, one term is spent in the Payne Whitney Psychiatric 
Clinic where the student gains a keen appreciation of the causes 
of mental and emotional illness, of the ways in which such illness 
may be prevented, and knowledge of the newer methods of therapy 
for its relief. 

An eight-week affiliation is provided with the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York, a family health agency. During this time the student 
has an opportunity, under supervision, to care for patients in their 
homes and to teach members of the family to give necessary care 
between visits of the nurse. Closely preceding or following this, there 
is a four-week period spent in the Medical-Surgical units of the Out- 
Patient Department. This is followed by four weeks in the Private 
Patient Service. A few seniors may have an elective experience with 
the New York State Department of Health. 

During one term of this last year, the senior returns once more to 
the Departments of Medicine and Surgery. She is now ready to accept 
almost complete responsibility for analyzing and planning to meet 
the nursing needs of selected patients. She receives instruction in 
planning the time and assignments of staff personnel, has experience 
as leader of a nursing "team," and is assigned to charge duty on a 
pavilion for limited periods of the day or night. There are four weeks 
of vacation during the summer term. Courses in the third year are: 

Course Class *Wks. Semester 
Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Psychiatry 180 30 2 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 181 60 4 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 182 *16 4 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 116 30 2 

Practice in Public Health Nursing 117 * 8 2 

Family and Community Health 115 20 1.5 

Professional Adjustments II 114 15 1 

Ward Activities and Relationships 126 15 1 

^Practice in Out-Patient Nursing (M&S) 118 ** 4 1 

Practice in Care of Private Patients (M&S) 146 ** 4 1 

Principles of Urological Nursing 153 15 1 

Practice of Urological Nursing 154 * 4 1 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 155 * 4 1 

Practice of Medical Nursing 145 ** 6 1.5 

Practice in Nutrition Clinic 133 * 2 0.5 

Total 185 48 24.5 

Grand Total (Professional Program) 1,421 120 95 

In addition to the class hours indicated above, there is a minimum of one (*) or two (**) 
hours a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients for 
whom the student has some responsibility. 

X Each student has in addition in her second year, two weeks of OPD experience while 
in the Pediatric Department and four weeks of OPT) while in the Woman's Clinic. 




A student makes friends with a small patient she is weighing in the Well-Baby 
Clinic of the Hospital. 




A student's life is not all work. The scene is one of the typical single student 
rooms in the Nurses' Residence. 



Description of Courses 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 13-14.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. This course aims to develop in the student an interest 
in good body mechanics in work and play, and to teach her how she may apply 
this knowledge in her patient care. It also aims to develop interest and skill in 
those individual activities which will enable her to use her leisure time to greater 
advantage. 
55 Hours. First Year. 32 Hours. Second Year. Miss McDERMOTT, Miss WORRELL. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information 
is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. HINSEY, Dr. BERRY, Dr. ANDERSON, Miss WRIGHT. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course consists of a study of the physiological systems and 
their integration into the total functions of the human body. It is closely related 
to the course in Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. PITTS, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG, Miss STOLL, 
Miss BARRETT. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism 
of food, and the composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. du VIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GILDER, Dr. 
GENGHOF, Miss KROOG. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE. 

F104. PATHOLOGY. A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the student 
with the principles of general pathology and with the more common clinical labora- 
tory procedures. The pathologic changes associated with inflammation, neoplasia, 
■ and cardio-vascular disease are presented and illustrated by kodachromes, gross 
I specimens, and microscopic slides. The techniques of routine urinalysis, blood 
I grouping, RH determination, and blood transfusion are demonstrated. 
I 15 Hours. First Year. Dr. KELLNER. 

27 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PERSONALITY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. A presentation of the 
biological, sociological, and psychological factors which contribute to the formation 
of the adult personality. The various stages of personality development, psycho- 
logical responses to emotions, and emotional factors in physical illness are discussed. 
Particular emphasis is placed upon the nurse-patient relationship and the adjust- 
ment of the individual student to the nursing profession. 

15 Hours. First Year. Dr. SHERFEY. 

111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. Study of the patient as a 
person conditioned by psychological and cultural influences. Interrelationship of 
individual, family, and community health, and the work of the nurse in the promo- 
tion of health and the prevention of disease. Lectures, conferences, projects, excur- 
sions to community agencies, reports. 

30 Hours. First Year. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss SOULE. 

112. HISTORY OF NURSING. In this course the international development of 
nursing is traced from its earliest forms to its present status. The influence of an 
ever-changing society upon nursing education is emphasized. 

30 Hours. Miss DUNBAR, Miss MALLORY. 

113. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS I. Consideration of the philosophical and 
ethical foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. 
Problems related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by the instructor and the students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours. First Year. Miss LYONS. 

114. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS II. A survey of the nursing field, particu- 
larly the place of the professional organizations, legislation affecting nursing, 
economics of medical and nursing care, the role of the practical nurse, placement 
and counseling agencies, periodicals and international aspects of nursing. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, and special lecturers. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING AND RELATED EXPERIENCES 

115. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. An introduction to public health 
nursing in relation to the health program as a whole. Consideration is given to 
the increasing responsibility of the nurse as a member of the health team. 

20 Hours. Third Year. Dr. SMILLIE, Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

116. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. A planned program 
of group conferences designed to acquaint the student with the functions of a 
family health agency as part of a community health program, to familiarize her 
with the responsibilities of a field nurse in carrying out these functions, and to point 
out the way these functions and responsibilities demonstrate good public health 
nursing practice. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

117. PRACTICE IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Activities include health super- 
vision of infants, school and pre-school children, and adults; maternity nursing, 
morbidity nursing in the home. Through carefully graded observation, individual 
conferences, case conference, and supervised practice, the student is given increasing 
responsibility for health work with a small, selected group of families. This exper- 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 29 

ience is by affiliation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, which provides 

a generalized public health nursing service including bedside care of the sick in their 

homes. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

(Elective Experience in Public Health Nursing: A jew senior students who have an 
outstanding record in general and who have shown particular interest and ability 
in Public Health Nursing may be offered the opportunity for an elective experience 
with the New York State Department of Health for a period of eight weeks.) 

118. PRACTICE IN OUTPATIENT NURSING. Preceding or following affiliation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, each student has an experience in 
selected clinics of the medical and surgical services; there are related family studies, 
conferences with members of the Social Service Department, visits to com- 
munity agencies. 
4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss NEWTON, Miss McMULLAN, and staff. 

NURSING AND ALLIED ARTS — GENERAL 

120. ORIENTATION. These discussions give the beginning student a general 
concept of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the 
individual who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical 
and mental health of the nurse as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in 
her work. 

12 Hours, First Year; ly 2 Hours, Second Year; li/ 2 Hours, Third Year. Miss 
DUNBAR, Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, Dr. BOWE 

121. NURSING ARTS I. This course is designed to give the student an understand 
ing of the basic physical needs of individuals and of how these may be met best in 
relation to the nursing care of a patient. There is emphasis upon desirable nurse 
patient relationships, and instruction is given in the simpler nursing procedures 
Practice includes the application of basic principles of nursing in the Nursing Arts 
Laboratory, and in the care of convalescent patients on the pavilions of the Hospital 
146 Hours. First Year. Miss FUERST, Miss MALLORY, Miss VAN ARSDALE, 
Miss WRIGHT. 

122. NURSING ARTS II. A course designed to give the student an understanding 
of advanced nursing principles and procedures, and to assist in the development 
and perfection of skills. It is correlated with lectures on the medical and surgical 
aspects of disease, and with instruction in nursing care pertinent to these conditions. 
Practice includes application of advanced nursing principles and procedures in the 
Nursing Arts Laboratory, and in the care of patients on the pavilions of the 
Hospital. There is opportunity for observation of nursing in the Out-Patient 
Department and for a brief experience in the Central Sterile Supply Department. 
193 Hours. First Year. Miss FUERST, Miss MALLORY, Miss VAN ARSDALE, 
Miss WRIGHT. 

124. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems 
used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calculating 
dosages. It stresses the nurse's responsibility in the administration of medicines. 
15 Hours. First Year. Miss McCLUSKEY. 

125. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse 
in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and com- 
monly used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administra- 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

tion, and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the importance of accurate adminis- 
tration of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 
30 Hours. First Year. Dr. FERGUSON. 

126. WARD ACTIVITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS. Consideration is given to the 
basic principles which underlie effective working relationships with professional 
and non-professional personnel. The student is also guided in recognizing and plan- 
ning for the use of learning situations as they relate to patients or younger students, 
and she is introduced to the activities which she will undertake when assigned 
to senior charge duty. 
15 Hours. Third Year. Miss HARMON. 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION AND COOKERY. A basic course in normal adult nutrition and 
in food preparation. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are 
discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services in the 
second year.) 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

131. DIET THERAPY. A course designed to present the underlying principles in 
the treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given concurrently with the 
lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. This course is supplemented by confer- 
ence work during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

132. PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY. The application of the principles of diet 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on pavilions of the Hospital. 
4 Weeks. Second Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG, 
Miss TILLOTSON, Miss STYCH, Miss WEIHL. 

133. PRACTICE IN NUTRITION CLINIC. During this experience, the student 
learns to teach therapeutic diets to out-patients, adapting these to their social and 
economic backgrounds. Under the supervision of the clinic dietitian. 

2 Weeks. Third Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG, 
Miss RICHMOND. 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize, and interpret required read- 
ing covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

32 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

141. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. A study of communicable diseases, including 
tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

13 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE 
DISEASE NURSING. The principles and methods of nursing care for patients with 
medical, neurogical, and communicable disease are considered. 

60 Hours. First Year. Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Miss BROOKS, Miss 
PLACE, Miss STIRLING. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

143. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL 
NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of medical nursing 
principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical and neurological 
pavilions of the Hospital. 

8 Weeks. First Year. Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss 
STIRLING, Miss PLACE, Miss BROOKS, Miss FAWCETT, Miss LIO. 

144. PRACTICE OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE NURSING. Two experiences of 
four weeks each are given in which students study and practice medical aseptic 
technique and nursing as related to the care of patients suffering from communi- 
cable diseases. The community problem presented by certain diseases such as tuber- 
culosis and venereal disease, as well as resources for their diagnosis and treatment, 
are brought to the attention of students through referrals and by individual and 
group conferences with public health nurses, social workers and others who are 
particularly concerned with these problems. 

8 Weeks. First and Second Year. Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss HUGHES, Miss PLACE, 
Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss FAWCETT, Miss LIO. 

145. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING. During the senior year students have 
opportunity to apply their knowledge and skill to the care of patients with complex 
nursing needs. Care of patients through the evening and night hours may be 
included. An overview of the managerial aspects of a clinical unit is given with pro- 
vision for supervised practice. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss PLACE, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss 
BROOKS, Miss FAWCETT, Miss LIO. 

146. PRACTICE IN CARE OF PRIVATE AND SEMI-PRIVATE PATIENTS. 
This experience offers an opportunity for the student to become aware of the 
needs of patients with a wide variety of socio-economic backgrounds. By means 
of supervised practice, the student also gains an appreciation of the varied methods 
of treating patients with the same diagnosis. 

4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss POOR, Miss AGNEW, Miss MEYEROWITZ. 



SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Conditions which require surgery are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. The factors which determine the need for surgical interference and the 
type of operations best suited to the condition are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon 
observations which should be made by the nurse both preceding and following 
operation. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. GLENN and staff. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. By the method of lecture and dem- 
onstration, the students are taught principles of surgical nursing. This includes the 
principles of surgical asepsis and the nursing care of patients with general surgical 
as well as specialized surgical conditions. 

45 Hours. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER. Miss DERICKS, Miss SWAN- 
WICK, Miss FOSTER, Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss NIELSEN. 

152. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. This includes study and supervised 
practice in the application of nursing principles to the care of patients on certain 
of the general and specialized surgical services of the Hospital. The student is 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

guided in gaining a concept of the preventive as well as the therapeutic responsibili- 
ties of the nurse. 

12 Weeks. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss NIELSEN, Miss FEDDER, Miss DERICKS, 
Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss FOSTER, Miss BUDD, Mrs. KENNEY. 

153. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. This course is planned to give 
the student a knowledge of the diseases and anomalies of the genito-urinary tract, 
and the principles underlying the care of patients with these conditions. Prepara- 
tion of the patient for self-care on discharge is stressed. Lectures, conferences, 
and demonstrations. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss SWANWICK, Dr. MARSHALL, and staff. 

154. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Opportunity is provided for the 
development of understanding and skill in meeting the special nursing needs of 
patients with urological conditions. Preparations for self-cure on discharge is 
stressed. 

4 weeks. Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss SWANWICK, Miss BUDD, 
Mrs. KENNEY. 

155. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. In the third year the student is given 
more responsibility for analyzing and meeting the nursing needs of patients, in- 
cluding preparation for self-care after discharge from the Hospital. In addition, she 
has an opportunity to assist with some of the managerial problems on the pavilions. 
4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss SWANWICK, Mrs. 
GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss BUDD, Mrs. KENNEY. 

156. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, dis- 
cussions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods 
of aseptic technique in relation to care of patients at the time of operation. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss OLSON, Miss SAFFIOTI. 

157. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Supervised clinical ex- 
perience and study of the application of nursing principles to the care of patients in 
the Operating Room. Students are given the opportunity to observe and assist 
with operative procedures, to relate this experience to the total care of surgical 
patients and to gain an appreciation of the qualities and abilities essential to 
effective nursing in this field. 

8 Weeks. Second Year. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss OLSON, Miss SAFFIOTI and staff. 



OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING 

160. OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. This course deals with the clinical, ana- 
tomical, physiological, and pathological aspects of pregnancy, labor, and the puer- 
perium, as well as of the female generative organs. Consideration is given to the 
psychosomatic approach in the prevention of complications, family-sociologic re- 
lationships in child bearing, the nature, development, and adjustment of the 
newborn. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Medical staff of the Woman's Clinic. 

161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. This 
course emphasizes the importance of antepartal observation and instruction, nutri- 
tional needs, infant care, obstetric and gynecologic procedures, current modes and 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

trends in therapy, including the series of exercises for preparation for labor (Natural 
Childbirth) and the application of this method to patient care. 
45 Hours. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss HIGGINSON, Mrs. 
GILPATRICK, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, Mrs. MIGUEL, Miss LIPTON, and Miss 
RYNBERGEN and staff. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Students ob- 
serve and care for infants, obstetric and gynecologic patients under supervision in 
the pavilions, nurseries, labor, and delivery rooms, and Out-Patient Department. 
Nursing care studies, conferences, and field trips are supplementary features of the 
course. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, 
Miss HIGGINSON, Mrs. MIGUEL, Miss LIPTON, Mrs. GILPATRICK. 



PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and 
disease. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Dr. LEVINE and staff. 

171. DEVELOPMENT OF BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN. A study of the normal 
child and his behavior in relation to his growth and needs from infancy to adult- 
hood. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Dr. MERCER. 

172. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the 
application of knowledge and understanding of ways of meeting the child's needs 
in health and during illness; the basic principles in nursing of children and the 
effects of illness on the child and his family. Lectures, case presentations, panel 
discussions, and role playing. 

60 Hours. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss STOKES, Miss GOULET, Miss 
TSCHIDA, Miss RYNBERGEN, and staff. 

173. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the ap- 
plication of knowledge to the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, 
and children in the Nursery School. Group conferences, demonstrations, and nursing 
care plans. 

| 16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss GOULET, Miss STOKES, Miss 
TSCHIDA, Miss DONDERO, Miss SIMMONS, Miss TERRY, Miss PEARSON, 
and staff. 



PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the path- 
ology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. The problems frequently encountered 
in infancy, childhood, adolescence, the aging period and senility are discussed. An 
historical survey of the development of psychiatry and the mental hygiene move- 
ment is offered, as well as an introduction to the techniques and social agencies con- 
cerned with helping people meet their problems. 
30 Hours. Third Year. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. 



34 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

181 .' PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The purpose of this course 
is to help the student gain an understanding of the basic principles in the nursing) 
care of patients with personality disorders and the nursing techniques utilizec 
in their treatment. Field trips are planned to acquaint the student with some of th< 
community facilities which are devoted to rehabilitation, as well as preventior 
and treatment of psychiatric illnesses. Psychiatric social service and out-patieni 
psychiatric services are included in the student's community experience. The tota 
program is oriented toward guiding the student in the development of an objective 
attitude toward emotional disorders, and a broader appreciation of the inter 
relationships between environmental, somatic, and constitutional factors as the) 
influence mental health. 
60 Hours. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss MUHS, Miss SMITH, Miss PAIGE, 
Mrs. SIMON, and staff. 

182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course consists of supervised 
experience in the observation and care of emotionally ill adult and adolescent 
patients during the acute phase of illness, as well as during convalescence. Students 
have an opportunity to participate in many of the currently approved forms oi 
psychiatric treatment. These include the following therapies: occupational, recre 
ational, physical, insulin, electro-convulsive, as well as psychotherapy, in each ol 
which there is particular emphasis on the special need of the individual patient. 
16 Weeks. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss MUHS, Miss SMITH, Miss SPARGO, 
Miss NEWBURG, Miss PAIGE, and staff. 



Administration 



JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD OF 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL-CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 



Neal Dow Becker, Chairman, Board of 

Trustees 
Arthur H. Dean 
Deane W. Malott, President of the 

University 

Hamilton Hadley, Vice-President 
Henry S. Sturgis, Vice-President for 

Finance 
John Hay Whitney, President of The 

Society of the New York Hospital 

John W. Davis 



Board of Trustees 

of 
Cornell University 



Board of Governors of 

The Society of 
the New York Hospital 



Stanhope Bayne-Jones, President 

COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Deane W. Malott, Chairman President of Cornell University 

Preston A. Wade 1 . 

n T > Trustees of Cornell University 

Ruth Irish ' ' 

Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr. 1 Governors of The Society of 

Mrs. Charles S. Payson J the New York Hospital 

David P. Barr President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones President, Joint Administrative Board 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-large 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

Joseph C. Hinsey Dean of the Cornell University Medical College 

Elizabeth Ogden, '44 Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Henry N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York 

Wilson G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive 

Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 

Elizabeth Lee Vincent Dean of the State College of Home 

Economics, Cornell University 

35 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D President of University 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones, M.D. President, Joint Administrative Board 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N. Associate Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A. Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Claire Calhoun, M.A. Assistant Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Mary C. Sloane, M.A. Assistant in Public Relations 

Georgia Saylor, B.A., B.S. in L.S. Librarian 

Mrs. Zdislava M. Kohak, Ph.D. Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Gould Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki, A.B. Secretary to the Dean 

Ruth Bowe, M.D. School Physician 

Mrs. Elizabeth Phillips Squier, A.B., R.N. 

Supervisor, Nurses' Health Service 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Poor, Secretary 

Dr. Barr Miss Hickcox Miss Lyons Miss Schubert 

Dr. Bayne-Jones Dr. Hinsey Miss Newton Miss Tuffley 

Miss Carbery Miss Klein Mrs. Overholser Mrs. Wright 

CHAIRMEN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss McCluskey 

Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Library Miss Saylor 

Records Miss Walters 

Student Affairs Miss Stirling 

Scholarships Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: 

First Year Miss Rynbergen 

Second Year , Miss Jump 

Third Year Miss Swanwick 

Student and Staff Health Mrs. Overholser 

Affiliating Students Miss Butall 

Programs for Graduate Nurses 

Principles and Practices of Nursing Miss Nielsen 



ADMINISTRATION 37 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Dorothy McMullan, '35 President 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. Gervais W. McAuliffe Chairman 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Office of Dean of Men, Dean of Women Mary Catherine Hudson, 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

College of Home Economics Jean Failing, 

Associate Professor of Home Economics, Student Counselor 

College of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

Rollin L. Perry 

Chairman, Advisory Board of Underclassmen 

College of Agriculture Howard S. Tyler, 

Professor in Personnel Administration 
in charge of Vocational Guidance Placement 

Office of Admissions Robert Storandt, 

Associate Director 



Faculty 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of the University 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 



PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of 
Nursing. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia University, 1930. Diploma, 
Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, London, 
England, 1936.) 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; M.A., 1951. Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 
1944.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of 

Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in 

Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia 
University, 1932.) 

Elizabeth U. Wright, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing; 
Director of Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mass- 
achusetts General Hospital, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 1948.) 

38 



FACULTY 39 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Muriel Carbery, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing 
Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1951.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936; M.A., 1951.) 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director, 
Nurses' Residence. (Diploma, Bouve-Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; B.S., 
New York University, 1930; M.A., 1932.) 

Kathleen Newton, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; Head of 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. [Anatomy], University of Washington, 1934; 
B.S. in Nursing, University of Washington, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

M. Eva Poor, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing; 
Head of Private Patient A T ursing Service. (A.B. Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 
1950.) 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Science. (B.S. , Simmons College, 
1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical College, 1938.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School of 
Nursing, Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1949.) 



Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B., University of Illinois, 1920; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1926.) 

INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing; 
Suprevisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Moses 
Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 
1945.) 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939; B.S., 1946; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Justine C. Butall, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Philadelphia General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1939; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1950.) 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Constance Derrell, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lin- 
coln School of Nursing, New York, 1938; B.S., New York University, 1945; Midwifery 
Certificate, Tuskegee Institute, Oklahoma, 1946; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1948.) 



;:.: 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary J. Foster, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1944; M.N., Yale University School 
of Nursing, 1947.) 

Eleanor Frany, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychia- 
tric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hackensack Hospital School of Nursing, 
Hackensack, New Jersey, 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; M.A., 1952.) 

Mildred Gilpatrick, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing, 
Supervisor, Women's Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Philadelphia General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1949, M.A., 1950.) 

Florence A. Gollner, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; 
Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jersey City Medical 
Center School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Syracuse University, 1949; M.S., 1949.) 

Lilian Henderson Ginsberg, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor. 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of 
Nursing, 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Elizabeth Harmon, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 1928; Diploma 
in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1951.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas 
School of Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1947.) 

Emma Jean Higginson, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Protestant Deaconess Hospital School of Nursing, Evansville, Ind., 1943; B.S., 
Columbia University, 1951.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Anne Hughes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1943; B.S., Cornell University, 1943.) 

Dorothy E. Jump, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Delivery Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henry Ford 
Hospital School of Nursing, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, 1943; 
Midwifery Certificate, Maternity Center Association, New York City, 1951.) 

Charity C. Kerby, M.A., R.N., Instructor, Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (B.A., Seattle Pacific College, Seattle, Washington, 1934; Diploma 
in Nursing, The Swedish Hospital Division, University of Washington School of 
Nursing, Seattle, Washington, 1946; M.A., University of Washington, Seattle, 
Washington, 1952.) 

H. Rosalind MacLean, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., Adelphi College, 1932; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 



FACULTY 41 

Audrey McCluskey, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Assistant Head of 
Medical Nursitig Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospi- 
tal School of Nursing, 1944; B. S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1948.) 

Dorothy McMullan, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; Assistant 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing. 1935; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1950.) 

Eleanor Muhs, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nursing, 
Rochester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948.) 

Edith Nielsen, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School 
of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Lucille Notter, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing; Assistant Director 
of Education, Visiting Nurse Service of Neru York City. (Diploma in Nursing, 
I Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing, Louisville, Ky., 1931; B.S., 
Columbia University, 1941; M.A., 1946.) 

Doris Place, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (B.S., Cornell University, 1942; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing. 1946.) 

jjlij |Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
I Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School of Nursing, 
Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 



Doris Schwartz, R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, Compresensive 
Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1942; Diploma in Public Health Nursing, 
University of Toronto, 1951.) 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Administrative Assistant for 
Staff Education. (B.A., Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas, 1940; 
Diploma in Nursing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1945; 
M.Ed., Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas, 1950.) 

Charlotte Stirling, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New England Hospital for Women and 
s Children, Boston, Mass., 1940; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

FO! 

M Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

r Mary H. Swan wick, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor in Surgical 

il Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, New 

lYork City, 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

thel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
ediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, 

Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1944; Diploma in Public 

Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 



42 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Jeannette Walters, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Assistant Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York University, 
1944; M.A., 1949.) 

Lucille Wright, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Science and in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., University oi 
Colorado, 1950.) 

FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D. Dean and Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D. Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D. Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D. Professor of Psychiatry 

Robert F. Pitts, M.D. Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du Vigneaud, Ph.D. Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D. ...Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D. Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D. Professor of Pediatrics 

James M. Neill, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D. Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Gordon R. Douglas, M.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles Berry, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Anatomy 

Wilbur Hagaman, M.D. Instructor in Anatomy 

David Anderson, Ph.D. Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Helena Gilder, M.D. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Martha J. Barrett, M.A. Assistant in Physiology 

Dorothy Genghof, Ph.D. Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Alice M. Stoll, M.S. Assistant in Physiology 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D. Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Frank C. Ferguson, Jr., M.D. Instructor in Pharmacology 



Associated with the Faculty 



assistants in instruction 



Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1931.) 

Berniece Cramer, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; ^ 
Evening Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, Hastings, Nebraska, Ma 
1944; B.A., Hastings College, Nebraska, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1951.) (hi 

Alice Marie DonDero, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 



I 



ASSOCIATED WITH FACULTY 43 

Laura Fawcett, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing, Evening Assistant Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1936.) 

Nancy Goulet, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 
1946; B.S., McCoy College, Johns Hopkins University, 1951.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., 1935.) 

Martha E. Jackson, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night 
Assistant Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1937.) 

Ruth E. Kenney, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 

Emily J. Kroog, B.S., Assistant in Science. (B.S., New Jersey College for Women, 
1949.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Johnston Hospital 
School of Nursing, Manila, P. I., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) 

, Lena J. Saffioti, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
3 Operating Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Michael's Hospital 
School of Nursing, Newark, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 



v.i 



Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
if Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton 
:;• Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School 
;of Nursing, Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947.) 

E. Jane Smith, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Cornell University, 1944.) 

Margaret Terry, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 
School of Nursing, Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

Martha Van Arsdale, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1949.) 

essie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 



1924.) 



Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psy- 
-.hiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 
Ipaverly, Mass., 1933.) 

Yvonne P. Worrell, B.S., Assistant in Physical Education, (B.S., Pennsylvania State 
Hollege, 1949.) 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures ^ 

Cornell University Medical College 

STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D. Director 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N. Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N. Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N. Evening Administrative Assistant 

Florence J. Tritt, B.N., R.N. Day Administrative Assistant for Auxiliary Staff 

Vera R. Keane, B.S., R.N. Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service 

Marjorie Agnew, M.A., R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lois Cantrell, B.Ed., R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Dorothy Knapp, R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Claire Meyerowitz, B.S., N.R. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ruth Nielsen, R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lucy Hickey, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Cora Karstetter, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Jessie Macintosh, R.N. Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Edward R. Browne, R.N. Evening Supervisor of Orderlies 

Thelma Cobb, R.N. Assistant Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

James Paterniti »... Assistant Supervisor of Orderlies 

HEAD NURSES 
MEDICINE 
Bielski, Mary Theresa, B.S. Hazeltine, Louise, B.S. Tagliabue, Alma E., B.S. 

Curtis, Jane, B.S. Majersky, Elizabeth C. Walberg, Norma 



Bitting, Amy Elizabeth 
Cherhoniak, Tillie 
Cullington, Barbara 
Dieterle, Doris 



SURGERY 

Lubowska, Nina 
McKeown, Elizabeth 
Mott, Marjorie Virginia 
Pruchnik, Blanche Pauline 



Dai 



Spalding, Elizabeth Ann, M 
Tomasulo, Theresa M. 
Young, Eleanor Louise 



OPERATING ROOM 

Bosco, Antoinette Margaret Husted, Salome Yauniskis 
Cook, Clara Eloise Johnson, Bethea Smith 

Davis, Vivian Ruth Milone, Marion Roberta 

Derr, Barbara Myers, Helen Dale 

Ellison, Dorothy Louise, B.A. Ondovchik, Anna Marie 
Farmer, Rosemary Rau, Rozalia Sturz, B.A. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Rectanus, Dorothy 
Sulette, Mary Carmen 
Thompson, Olive Philbric 
Vella, Mary Theresa 
Westphal, Freda Mae 



Beaty, Lillian Marie 
Bott, Alma Frances 
Calder, Elizabeth, M.A. 
Colwell, Anna Loretta 
Conner, Agnes Alice 
Douyard, Dorothy Margaret 



Hawtin, Clara 
Jackson, Dorothy Alice 
Knox, Violet Elizabeth 
Leonardo, Yolanda 
Lovette, Virginia Dare 



Mathews, Thelma Corine 
Matus, Veronica 
Metzger, Dorothy Louise, 1 
Wright, Miriam Rachel 
Young, Kathleen Dorothy [ Lli 
lb 



'.Ia 



Wt 



ASSOCIATED WITH FACULTY 45 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 
Clark, Evelyn Stuart Liddle, Evelyn Roberts, Mary Frances, B.S. 

Curley, Irene Long, Ilene Rouchleau, Margaret 

Evans, Alberta Irene Nussbaumer, Elsa Wagner, Carolyn Elizabeth 

Lambert, Lucille Rigg s > Mary Elise, B.A. \\ 7 illet, Marion, M.A. 

Larrow, Joyce Alice 

PRIVATE PATIENTS 
Albee, Margaret Elaine Kozitzky, Mary Smith, Anne Louise 

Clark, Mary Inez Rose, Lefa Mable Smith, Helen 

Gerchak, Mary 

PEDIATRICS 

Anderson, Marie Alvida Hurwitz, Flora Spencer, Grace Roberts 

Fripp, Carol Christine, B.S. Spellman, Susanne Agnes, B.S.Zemlock, Margaret, B.S. 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 
ampbell, Marjorie McKee, Beatrice Wachaus, Jean 

Fry, Meredith Morrison, Esther Wiegand, Jean 

Goodman, Gertrude, M.A. Poderesky, Arlene Ulatowski, Amelia 

Lundgren, Grace Sims, Helen 

INFIRMARY 
illespie, Margaret 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephenson, B.S., M.S., Director 
Meredith Jones, B.S. Elizabeth Richmond, B.S., M.A. 

atherine Kellerman, B.S. Marie A. Stych, B.S. 

Theresa Nodolski, B.S. Jeanne Tillotson, B.S. 

usan Paige, B.S. Marianne Weihl, B.S. 

/ircinia Pearson, B.S. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

VIildred Spargo, O.T.R. Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

in,!|rHEODATE H. Soule, M.A. Director, Main Hospital 

/irginia T. Kinzel, A.B. Director, Woman's Clinic 

tfELLY Simon, Dipl., N. Y. School of Social Work Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

DIVISION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Consultant, Nursery School 

leanor Blumgart, B.A. Director, Nursery School 

vIary Packard, B.S. Teacher, Nursery School 

2velyn Wolff, B.S., O.T.R. Occupational Therapy 

VISITING NURSE SERVICE OF NEW YORK 

.Iakian Randall, B.S., R.N. Director 

and Staff 

NURSERY SCHOOLS 

►Irs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Director, Bank Street Nursery School 

l Llizabeth Doak Director, Downtown Community Nursery School 

4rs. Dorothy Cleverdon Teacher-Education, Summer Play Schools 



:- 



Students in the School 



Name Class Home 

Albert, Betty Ann '53 Norwich, N. Y. 

Alexander, Inge '52 New York, N. Y. 

Arabia, Rose M. '53 West Chester, Pa. 

Benjamin, Beverly Elinor .. '53 Jersey City, N. J. 

Benton, Mary Patricia '54 Monson, Mass. 

Black, Dorothy Helen '53 Wayne, Pa. 

Berman, Arleen Schultz '52 New York, N. Y. 

Bernart, Sarah Tyler '54 New Canaan, Conn. 

Bernet, Mary Elizabeth '53 Johnstown, Pa. 

Birdsall, Elizabeth Ann '52 Mount Hermon, Mass. 

Bither, Mariel Alma '54 Lowell, Mass. 

Blaney, Joy '53 Weston, Mass. 

Blinn, Carolyn Mae '52 Newtown, Pa. 

Blodgett, Patricia Simmons '52 Bucksport, Me. 

Bolles, Nancy Courtright '52 River Edge, N. J. 

Bosco, Rosemarie Ann '54 Winsted, Conn. 

Breslin, Patricia Pearl '54 Richfield Springs, N. Y, 

Brunner, Martha Louise '54 Plainfield, N. J. 

Burleigh, Ruth Anne '53 Tilton, N. H. 

Cali, Cynthia Amelia '54 Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Campbell, Margaret Mary. .'54 Cortland, N. Y. 

Caner, Julia Ann '53 Baltimore, Md. 

Carter, Patricia Marie '53 Bronx, N. Y. 

Caruso, Marie D. '52 Mechanicville, N. Y. 

Cella, Joan Marie '54 Hoboken, N. J. 

Ceritelli, Louise Marion '52 New York, N. Y. 

Cole, Marie Julia '54 Oberlin, Ohio 

Charlton, Arlyn '53 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Chase, Phyllis Bradford '53 Brockton, Mass. 

Christman, Joan Mary '53 Scotia, N. Y. 

Cody, Jane P. '53 Arlington, Mass. 

Connell, Jane Marie '54 Jersey City, N. J. 

Cooke, Doris Louise '54 No. Plainfield, N. J. 

Corrigan, Mary Louise '54 Scituate, Mass. 

Currie, Mary Louise '54 Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

Davenport, Joan '52 Amherst, Mass. 

Davison, Frances '54 Johnsburg, N. Y. 

Dekker, Helen Anne '54 Bedford, Ohio 

Dervinis, Aldona Beatrice '53 Plymouth, Pa. 

Dobson, Betty Lou '52 Elmhurst, L. I. 

Dorn, Ruth Elizabeth '52 Souderton, Pa. 

Duboy, Vera Swailkovsky '54 Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Duncan, Elizabeth Ann '53 La Grange, 111. 

Eastwick, Marjorie Eliz. '54 N. Arlington, N. J. 

Evans, Jane B. '52 Penn Valley, Pa. 

Figueroa, Maria Fermina ....'54 Bronx, N. Y. 

Fincke, Anne Harper '54 Manhasset, N. Y. 

Forman, Barbara '53 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

French, Muriel Feo '54 Bronxville, N. Y. 

* Including those graduating in September, 1952, but not 

46 



From 
St. Lawrence Universit 
Hunter College 
Temple University 
Green Mt. Junior Colle^ 
U. of Massachusetts 
Oberlin College 
Brooklyn College 
Conn. Coll. for Women 
University of Pittsburg! 
U. of Massachusetts 
Simmons College 
Mills College 
State Teachers College, 

East Stroudsburg, Pa. 
U. of Maine 
Tenn. Wesleyan Jr. Col 
St. Joseph College 
Cornell University 
Houghton College 
Colby College 
St. Josephs College 
Cortland State Teachers 

College 
Drew University 
Hunter College 
Russell Sage College 
New York University 
Hunter College 
Oberlin College 
St. Lawrence University 
Westbrook Jr. College 
St. Lawrence University 
Pembroke College 
Rosemont College 
Houghton College 
Colby College 
Cornell University 
Goucher College 
Cornell University 
Denison University 
Wilkes College 
Packer Collegiate Inst. 
Temple University 
Susquehanna U. 
Cornell College (Iowa) Ion 
Oberlin College 
Colby Junior College 
Brooklyn College 
Simmons College 
Hofstra College 
Penn. Coll. for Women 



those entering at that time 



in! 



Mill 
k 

lar< 



■lt\ 



illeg 



Name 



Class 



til 



Freyer, Ann '53 

Gansel, Inge Ursula '54 

Garcia, Rose Margaret '53 

Gear, Betty Lou '53 

Gillette, Sally Ann '54 

Gleick, Mary Louise '54 

Gold, Patricia Ann '54 

Goldman, Lillian '52 

Goldstein, Marilyn Joyce ....'52 

Gosling, Sally F. '54 

Greenberg, Pearl '53 

Greisen, Claire Ann '52 

Greus, Ruth Lillian '53 

Grinwis, Helen May '52 

Grove, Jane Lee '53 

Grover, Margaret Ruth '54 

Hambleton, Joan Louise ....'54 

Hammer, Sheila '53 

Hanks, Joanne Osterheld ... .'53 

Hartman, Maxine '54 

Hartvigsen, Lois M. '53 

Hazard, Elaine Willis '53 

Henderson, Grace Beattie '54 

Henderson, Nancy '54 

Heston, Carolyn Marie . '54 

High, Carol B. '53 

Ho, Edna Yuk Lin '52 

Hoehn, Lorraine Martha ....'54 

Holland, Joan '53 

Holland, Judith '53 

Hollingshead, Mary Allyn. ...'53 
Holmes, Elizabeth DuPeza..'52 
Hopkins, Janice Elizabeth ....'53 

Hunter, Anne Elinore '53 

imschweiler, Patricia A. '54 

fackson, Dorothea Elsa '53 

[ohnson, Marie Glen '52 

fones, Catharine B. '52 

fordan, Mary Elizabeth '52 

Caul, Elizabeth M. '53 

Kawaguchi, Toshiye '53 

Ceagle, Marion Nancy '52 

Ceeler, Emily Ann '54 

tnappe, Irene Anita '54 

Cnowlton, Ann Witherbee..'52 

Cobrick, Dolores Ann '53 

Cornegay, Elva Alice '52 

Courakos, Kathryn '54 

Junin, Gloria Delcoff '52 

agonegro, Catherine '54 

arson, Lydia Schleicher ....'54 

everage, Dorothy Ann '54 

ewis, Phyllis Mary '54 

iebenau, Irene Ada '53 

ucker, Jean Brehmer '53 

tfacGregor, Jean '54 

Madden, Jane Ann '54 



STUDENTS 

Home 
Cornwall-on.Hudson, N.Y 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Miami, Fla. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Fairfield, Conn. 
Jerwyn, Pa. 
Oceanside, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Elmsford, N. Y. 
Maplewood, N. J. 
Clifton, N. J. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Afton, N. Y. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Palmer, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 
Scotch Plains, N. J. 
Brewster, N. Y. 
East Orange, N. J. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Akron, Ohio 
Reading, Pa. 
Honolulu, T. H. 
Springfield, N. J. 
Summit, N. J. 
Summit, N. J. 
Longmeadow, Mass. 
Patchogue, N. Y. 
Williamsville, N. Y. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Tremont, Pa. 
Hopewell Junction, N. Y. 
Farmington, Maine 
Richmond, Ind. 
South China, Me. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Olean, N. Y. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Hazelton, Pa. 
Seven Springs, N. C. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Easton, Md. 
W. Newton, Mass. 
New London, Conn. U. 
Eggertsville, N. Y. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



47 

From 
.McGill University 
Cornell University 
Florida State U. 
Elmira College 
Madison College 
Marywood College 
St. Lawrence University 
Hunter College 
U. of Connecticut 
Middlebury College 
Brooklyn College 
Good Counsel College 
Green Mt. Jr. College 
N. J. Coll. for Women 
Bradford Jr. College 
Cornell University 
Dickinson College 
U. of Connecticut 
Bates College 
Queens College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Upsala College 
Hood College 
Centenary Jr. College 
Ursinus College 
U. of Hawaii 
Newark College 
Drew University 
Drew University 
Cornell University 
Hofstra College 
Cornell University 
Upsala College 
Bucknell University 
Russell Sage College 
University of Maine 
Swarthmore College 
University of Maine 
Hofstra College 
U. C. L. A. 
Westminster College 
Hood College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
College of St. Theresa 
Penn. State College 
Wake Forest College 
New York University 
U. of Cincinnati 
Elmira College 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Washington College 
Colby College 
U. of Connecticut 
Elmira College 
Cornell University 
Hunter College 



48 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Class Home 

Manning, Helen Louise '52 Staten Island 

Marden, Nancy Hubbard ....'52 Boston, Mass. 

Martin, Mary Chandler '52 New York, N. Y. 

Maxson, Judith '54 Hartsdale, N. Y. 

McCabe, Ann Marie Clare ...'53 Scranton, Pa. 

McCormack, Jean Clair '52 Bayonne, N. J. 

McKaig, Doris Marguerite... '52 Jordan, N. Y. 

McLellan, Lillias Tarlton ....'54 Pelham, N. Y. 

Menzel, Joan Louise '53 Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Millar, Mary Louise '54 Hamburg, N. Y. 

Mohr, Sara Ann '54 Alburtis, Pa. 

Morse, Ruth '54 Winchester, Mass. 

Morrison, Peggy Ann '53 Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Mulherin, Virginia Ann '52 Scranton, Pa. 

Mutch, Elizabeth A. '53 Morristown, N. J. 

Naranjo, Maria Teresa '53 Quito, Ecuador 

Nein, Janet Louise '52 Westfield, N. J. 

Nelson, Carole Ann '53 New York, N. Y. 

Niedert, Emily '54 Noroton, Conn. 

Olena, Ann Virginia '54 Hershey, Pa. 

Palmer, Jean L. '54 South Portland, Maine 

Parsons, Sara Elizabeth '53 Amagansett, N. Y. 

Perrigo, Janet Medston '53 Hallowall, Maine 

Peterson, Blanche Marie ....'53 Cambridge, Mass. 

Peterson, Lois Gritzke '52 Buffalo, N. Y. 

Pollens, Janet '52 New York, N. Y. 

Potter, Judith Merle '54 Providence, R. I. 

Rahmer, Ann Elizabeth '53 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Reese, Josephine '54 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Reif, Lillian Hughston '52 Spartanburg, S. C. 

Robinson, Eleanor Pulley. ...'52 Westfield, N. J. 

Salvati, Phyllis Jean '53 Westfield, N. J. 

Sarr, E. Roxanna '54 East Greenbush, N. Y. 

Sater, Anita '52 Long Island City, N. Y. 

Savage, Patricia '52 Randolph, Vt. 

Sawyer, Marilyn Charlotte . '54 Bedminster, N. J. 

Schelle, Alma M. '54 New York, N. Y. 

Schick, Barbara Helen '53 Milford, N. J. 

Schipman, Barbara Mabel ... '53 Las Cruces, N. M. 

Schlitt, Merylin Anne '52 Darien, Conn. 

Scott, Marilyn Elizabeth '53 Rochester, N. Y. 

Scheldon, Alice Louise '52 Kingston, N. Y. 

Simon, Marga Ida '53 Schenectady, N. Y. 

Skidmore, Sally Louise '52 Staten Island, N. Y. 

Sparrell, Katherine '53 Larchmont, N. Y. 

Stanton, Beverly Fay '54 Waterloo, N. Y. 

Stanton, Hannah Kathryn....'54 Mount Carmel, N. Y. 

Stein, Caryl Jeanne '52 Manhasset, N. Y. 

Stein, Joanne '54 Manhasset, N. Y. 

Steinberg, Geraldine '54 New York, N. Y. 

Strickland, Jeanne Ann '54 E. Greenwich, R. I. 

Stutts, Ann Florence '54 Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Taranto, Mary Rose '54 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Teeter, Martha Ann '53 Elmira, N. Y. 

Thorn, Elizabeth '52 Princeton, N. J. 

Thomas, Barbara Joan '53 Larchmont, N. Y. 



From 



Si'' 



Wilson College 
University of Maine 
Duke University 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Marywood College 
College of New Rochelle 
Elmira College 
Colby College 
Hunter College 
St. Lawrence College 
Ursinus College 
Cornell University 
Green Mt. Jr. College 
Marywood College 
Bryn Mawr College 
University of Washingtor 
Pembroke College 
Concordia Collegiate Insi 
Lawrence College 
Hershey Jr. College 
University of Maine 
Cornell University 
Colby College 
St. Mary-of-the-Woods 

College 
Concordia Collegiate Insi 
Hunter College 
Colby Junior College 
College of New Rochelle 
Bradley University 
Limestone College 
Russell Sage College 
Hood College 
Cornell University 
Concordia Collegiate Inst I 
Russel Sage College 
Drew University 
Queens College 
N. J. College for Women 
N.'M. College of A.&M.A 
Mt. St. Agnes College 
Elmira College 
Bethany College 
Syracuse University 
Cornell University 
Centenary Jr. College 
Cornell University 
Univ. of Pittsburgh 
Elmira College 
St. Lawrence University 
New York University 
Colby College 
College of Wooster 
Brooklyn College 
Elmira College 
N. J. College for Women 
College of Mt. St. Vincent 



Name 



Class 



Thompson, Jean E. '52 

Thompson, Regina Dorth ...'54 

Towne, Patricia '54 

Trefny, Jeanne Carol '54 

Tully, Joan Ann '54 

Tyminski, Dorothy Judith ..'54 



Tynan, Eleanor Mary '52 

Urban, Patricia Devine '52 

Vander, Evelyn M. '52 

Van Name, Janet Ruth ... '54 

Veit, Rosemary Jane '54 

Viola, Yvonne Joy '54 

von der Heyde, Alice 

Dalmar '54 

Vosgian, Dorothy Jean '52 

Warner, Gloria Agnes '53 

Ins Watkins, Marilyn Jean '53 

Weller, Martha Louise '52 

White, Marion Carolyn ... '53 

Whitnah, Ruth Lydon '53 

Whittemore, Patricia '52 

Wiant, Betty Joan '54 

Wilson, Nancy '52 

Wohlberg, Ilene Myrle '52 

Wood, Sally Ann '54 

VVoodlock, Marion 

Elizabeth '52 

Youmans, Margaret Ann ...'53 
leng, Garbo '54 



[ 



b. 



STUDENTS 

Home 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Bluefield, W. Va. 
Kalispell, Mont. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Jersey City, N. J. 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Bronx, N. Y. 

Verona, N. J. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Calverton, N. Y. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Bronxville, N. Y. 
Oyster Bay, L. I. 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Portland, Maine 
Westfield, N. J. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Teaneck, N. J. 
Princeton, N. J. 

New York, N. Y. 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Shanghai, China 



49 



From 



Elmira College 
Bluefield State College 
Mt. Holyokc College 
St. John's University 
Rosemont College 
Montclair State Teachers 

Coll. 
Western Coll. for Women 
Hunter College 
New York University 
Cornell University 
Mt. St. Agnes College 
Hunter College 

Hood College 
Wheaton College 
Lasell Jr. College 
Russell Sage College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Concordia Collegiate Inst 
Wheaton College 
Westbrook Jr. College 
Susquehanna University 
Penn College for Women 
N. J. College for Women 
Cornell University 

Hunter College 
Rosemont College 
Hope College 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning theii 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible back 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 



Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

525 East 68th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive informatior 
which will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursiiN 
school entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or expected 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 
19 



Please send me an application blank 

(See page 13 regarding when to request and check if desired.) 



Iksf 

ltd 

,. 
Al 

20 
id 

Uii 

li 
<:.■. 
ca 

f 
12 
k 

ID 
11 

llf 

,aa ! 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

'7 give and bequeath to Cornell University (or "I give and 
bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital") the 
sum of $ for the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift to the School of Nursing shall be 
made in whole or in part for any specific purpose in the 
program of the School such use may be specified. 



qi 



a 



Index 



Absences, 19 

Accreditation of the school, 5 

\ctivities, 20; Nurses' Residence, 20; 
Alumnae Association, 22; recreation, 
20; marriage and residence, 21-22; 
school government, 21; counseling 
services, 22 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
35-45 

Admission, requirements for, 10; appli- 
cation for, 12; age and health re- 
quirements, 11; credit requirements, 
12; educational requisites, 11 

advanced standing, 14 

lim of school, 5 

ilumnae Association, 22, 37; Irene Sut- 
liffe Fund, 17 

Lnatomy, 24, 27 

application for admission, 12-13 

ssistant professors, 39 

ssistants in instruction, 42-43 

ssociate professors, 38 

ssociated with the faculty, 42-45 

asic nursing program, 23; professional 
curriculum, 23 
equest, form of, 50 
iochemistry, 24, 27 
iological and physical sciences, 27 

alendar, 3 

areer opportunities in nursing, 4 

ilinics, 8-9 

ommittee for Scholarships, 17, 37 

Dmmunicable disease nursing, 24, 31 
an tents, 2 

iornell University, 7; degree, 14; ad- 
visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
dents, 37; Medical College faculty, 
42 

uncil of the School, 35 
unseling services, 22 



Courses, description of, 27-34 
Credit requirements, 12 
Curriculum, professional, 23; first year, 
24; second year, 25; third year, 26 

Degree, 14 

Description of courses, 27-34 

Development of Behavior in Children, 
25, 33 

Diet Therapy, 24, 25, 30 

Diploma, 14 

Division of Child Development, De- 
partment of Pediatrics, 25, 45 

Educational requisites, 11 
Emeritus professors, 38 
Executive faculty, 36 
Expenses, 15 

Facilities for instruction, 8-10 

Faculty, 38-42; associated with, 42-45, 
committees of, 36 

Faculty instructors, 39-42 

Family and Community Health, 26, 28 

Fees and expenses, 15; method of pay- 
ment, 16 

Financial aid, 17-18 

Graduation, 13, 14; advanced standing, 
14; degree and diploma, 14 

Head nurses, 44, 45 
Health service, 18-19 
History of school, 6-7 
History of Nursing, 25, 28 

Joint Administrative Board, 35 

Lecturers, 44 
Libraries, 8 
Loan fund, 17 

Maintenance, 16 

Marriage, 21 

Medical Nursing, 24, 26, 30, 31 



51 



52 INDEX 

Medicine, 24, 30 
Microbiology, 24, 27 

New York Hospital, 6-9; nursing super- 
visors, 44; head nurses, 44-45; staff, 
44-45 

Nurses' Residence, 8, 20-21 

Nursing and allied arts — general, 29; 
Nursing Arts I, 24, 29; Nursing Arts 
II, 24, 29 

Nutrition, 30; department of, 45; Nu- 
trition and Cookery, 24, 30 

Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing, 
25, 32-33; Obstetric and Gynecology, 
25, 32 

Officers of administration, 36 

Operating Room Nursing, 25, 32 

Orientation, 24, 29 

Out-Patient Department, 9, 25-26 

Out-Patient Nursing 26, 29 

Pathology, 24, 27 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9, 45 

Pediatric Nursing; 25, 33; pediatrics, 

25, 33 
Personality Growth and Development, 

24, 28 
Pharmacology I, 24, 29; Pharmacology 

II, 24, 29 
Physical Education, 24, 25, 27 
Physiology, 24, 27 
Private Patient Nursing, 26, 31 
Professional Adjustments I, 24, 28 
Professional Adjustments II, 26, 28 
Professors, 38 
Program, basic nursing, 23 



Promotion and graduation, 13-14; stl 
Advanced standing, Degree, Diplom 

Psychiatric Nursing, 26, 33-34; psychi; 
try, 26, 33 

Public health affiliations, 10, 23, 26 

Public Health Nursing, 28-29 

Recreational facilities, 20-21 
Registration, State, 5-6 
Residence and marriage, 21-22 

Scholarships, 17-18 

School government, 21 

School of Nursing, administrative o 

fleers, 36; faculty committees, 36 
Social and Health Aspects of Nursin: 

24, 28 
Social Sciences, 28 
Social Service Departments, 10, 45 
State registration, 5-6 
Student life and activities, 20-22 
Students now in school, 46-49 
Supervisors, nursing, 44 
Surgical Nursing, 24, 26, 31-32; Surger 

24, 31 

Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 15 

Uniforms, 15; see also Maintenanc 
Urological Nursing, 26, 32 

Vacations, 19 

Visiting Nurse Service of New Yorl 
10, 26, 45 

Ward Activities and Relationships, 2< 
30 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



JULY 29, 1953 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1953-54 SESSIONS 






Term Dates 1953-54 



Class of 1954 

Sept. 28, 1953 

Jan. 18, 1954 

May 10, 1954 

Classes of 1955 and 1956 

Sept. 28, 1953 

Dec. 21, 1953 

March 15, 1954 

June 7, 1954 

Sept. 27, 1954 



Jan. 17, 1954 
May 9, 1954 
Sept. 23, 1954 



Dec. 20, 1953 

March 14, 1954 

June 6, 1954 

Sept. 26, 1954 

Dec. 19, 1954 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of 
New York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from 
York Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is reached most easily through the main 
entrance of the Hospital on East 68th Street (east of York Ave- 
nue) . The Nurses Residence is at the corner of York Avenue and 
70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus, M-7, east-bound, runs to the 
Medical Center. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 45. Number 3. July 29, 1953. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



ITHACA, NEW YORK 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1953-1954 

525 EAST 68TH STREET, NEW YORK 21, N.Y. 



Contents 



Calendar 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim and Philosophy of the School 5 

Accreditation 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History 6 

Facilities for Instruction 8 

Admission 10 

Promotion and Graduation 14 

Fees and Expenses 16 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 18 

Health Service 19 

Vacations and Absences 20 

Student Life and Activities 21 

Basic Nursing Program 24 

Description of Courses 29 

Administration 38 

Faculty 41 

Associated with the Faculty 46 

Students in the School 50 

Form of Bequest 54 

Index 55 



Picture Credits: 
Percy W. Brooks, Anthony Lanza, Paul Parker 



Calendar 



1953 



Sept. 


24 Thursday 


Commencement 


Sept. 


26 Saturday 


Registration for Freshmen students 


Oct. 


12 Monday 


Holiday: Columbus Day 


Nov. 


26 Thursday 


Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 


Dec. 


24 Thursday 


Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 


Dec. 


25 Friday 


Holiday: Christmas Day 
1954 


Jan. 


1 Friday 


Holiday: New Year's Day 


Jan. 


3 Sunday 


Last Day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 


Feb. 


12 Friday 


Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 


Feb. 


22 Monday 


Holiday: Washington's Birthday 


May 


31 Monday 


Holiday: Memorial Day 


July 


5 Monday 


Holiday: Independence Day 


Sept. 


6 Monday 


Holiday: Labor Day 


Sept. 


23 Thursday 


Commencement 


Sept. 


25 Saturday 


Registration of Freshmen students 


Oct. 


12 Tuesday 


Holiday: Columbus Day 


Nov. 


25 Thursday 


Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 


Dec. 


24 Friday 


Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 


Dec. 


25 Saturday 


Holiday: Christmas Day 
1955 


Jan. 


1 Saturday 


Holiday: New Year's Day 


Jan. 


2 Sunday 


Last Day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 


Feb. 


12 Saturday 


Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 


Feb. 


22 Tuesday 


Holiday: Washington's Birthday 


May 


30 Monday 


Holiday: Memorial Day 


July 


4 Monday 


Holiday: Independence Day 



Career Opportunities in Nursing 



Professional Nursing is continually growing and expanding in its 
efforts to bring better service to more people. The broadening concept 
of health care with its emphasis on the maintenance of health, the 
prevention of illness and the rehabilitation of the handicapped, has 
brought with it, not only the need for more nurses but for better 
qualified practitioners. More and more nursing service is reaching 
people outside the walls of the hospital — in homes, factories, schools, 
offices, clinics — and the recipients of these services include people in 
all stages of health and in all age groups. 

The scope of activity of the modern nurse also increases as the 
boundaries of knowledge are pushed back in the field of health. To 
qualify for professional practice today requires a great deal more than 
a knowledge of techniques, for the nurse is constantly called upon to 
exercise judgement based on expert knowledge and understanding, 
to identify nursing problems and to decide upon courses of nursing 
action. Her education must provide her with a solid foundation not 
only in the social and biological sciences, but also in the humanities. 

Physical and mental illness is often caused by conditions in the 
home, on the job or in the community. Therefore, personal relation- 
ships, the role of the family, understanding of the growth and develop- 
ment of children and community organization for meeting health 
needs, are some of the things which must be included in her 
preparation. 

The nurse needs to be a teacher as well as a practitioner of nursing 
and her instructions encompass not only her patients and their 
families, but non-professional co-workers, such as the practical nurse 
and nurses' aid. To the extent that she can give leadership in this kind 
of team relationship, nursing care is substantially increased in both 
quantity and quality. 

Those young women who are interested in preparing to teach in 
schools of nursing or to become administrators, — two fields in which 
the positions are varied and interesting — will find that they are able 
to do so with little difficulty or loss of time, if the preparation which 
they have had in their basic professional program has been broad 
and sound. 



li 



The Aim and Philosophy of the School 

It is the aim of the School to help prepare qualified practitioners of 
nursing for beginning positions in hospitals, public health agencies, 
and the many other situations where professional nursing service is 
needed, and to help the student understand her future role in a 
profession which accepts an ever-increasing responsibility to society. 

It is recognized that the development of the student into a well- 
integrated and responsible individual is necessary for the realization 
of this aim, and it is the belief of the School that preparation of this 
nature can best be accomplished when the student has the opportunity 
to develop a general and educational maturity which will enable her 
to function with the widest possible perspective. With a focus thus 
broadened she is potentially a more versatile, adaptable and under- 
standing practitioner. 



Accreditation 



The School is accredited by the Accrediting Service of the National 
League for Nursing as one of a small number of collegiate schools 
which prepare students for professional practice in public health 
nursing as well as for practice in hospitals and in other fields of 
nursing. The School is a member of the Department of Baccalaureate 
and Higher Degree Programs of the National League for Nursing and 
meets the requirements of the New York State Department of 
Education. 



State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates who are citizens are eligible for admission to the examina- 
tion for licensure administered by the Regents of the State of New 
York and are expected to take the first examination given after comple- 
tion of the nursing course. Satisfactory completion of this examination 
classifies the graduate of the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in 
the State of New York. Having become registered in New York State, 
it is possible to apply for registration without examination in other 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

states. In New York State, if citizenship is not completed within seven 
years from the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

The New York State Nurse Practice Act states that a nurse must be 
licensed by examination in the state in which she was graduated. For 
this reason, graduates of this School are urged to take State Board ex- 
aminations in New York State rather than in another state as they 
may wish to practice in New York State at a future date. 



History 



One of the first such schools to be founded in the United States, this 
School of Nursing celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary in 1952. As 
early as 1799, Dr. Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physi- 
cian, organized at The NeAv York Hospital a series of lectures for 
nurses combined with a course of practical instruction in the wards. 
Although the theoretical content was meager and the practical instruc- 
tion not systematially planned, these classes focussed attention on the 
fact that women who had some preparation for their work gave better 
care to patients than those without instruction. Each year the program 
was amplified and in 1877 a formal training school for nurses was 
established "to consist of one teacher and 24 pupils." 

GROWTH OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

The New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in America, has 
been throughout its 182-year history, a voluntary, non-profit, general 
hospital, maintained by contributions and endowments. Granted a 
Royal Charter in 1771, during the reign of George III, the Hospital's 
first patients were American soldiers wounded in the Revolutionary 
War. Starting its service to the nation by thus serving in the conflict to 
establish the Republic, the Hospital has made outstanding contribu- 
tions in every war of our country's history. 

From those first Colonial years, The New York Hospital has pio- 
neered in the field of medicine and of community service. Among 
the Hospital's earliest progressive steps was its recognition of the fact 
that the mentally ill were sick persons needing medical care, rather 
than outcasts fit only for prison or the almshouse. The Hospital intro- 
duced vaccination for small pox for the first time in America, and also 
the use of the temperature chart — now standard practice in all hos- 
pitals. Carrying on in this tradition, the Hospital has taken leadership 



HISTORY OF SCHOOL 7 

in many important new programs including studies in psychosomatic 
medicine and the establishment of an ambulatory transfusion clinic for 
the treatment of serious blood conditions. 

In a four-fold program of community service, The New York Hos- 
pital has provided care of the sick — regardless of ability to pay; 
teaching — providing clinical instruction for medical students as early 
as 1791, lectures and practical instruction for nurses starting in 1799; 
research and preventive medicine. 

As a result of these services, as well as the growth of the city and 
the increasing scope of knowledge related to health, expansion and 
relocation have been necessary; from its original site on Broadway and 
Pearl Streets, the Hospital moved up to West 16th Street in 1877 and 
then in 1932, having entered into formal affiliation with Cornell 
University, moved uptown to the present site to occupy, with the 
Medical College the present group of buildings known as The New 
York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. 

SCHOOL BECOMES PART OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



The health needs of the community have always been the driving 
force behind the program and organization of the School of Nursing 
which has grown and expanded to keep pace with those needs. The 
first course was eighteen months long, and after thirteen years this was 
increased to twenty-four months, and in 1896 to three years. Thus, it 
was in keeping with this tradition of progress that in 1942, on the 65th 
anniversary of its founding, the School of Nursing became a part of 
Cornell University, making available the resources of the two great 
institutions, each with a long history and notable record of achieve- 
ment in the fields of education and public service. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
Government's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
under the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object 
shall be ... to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a re- 
markable system of higher education. However, it received its greatest 

i impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under 
the influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first 
president, determined the form of the new University. In 1864, an 
agreement was reached with the legislature of New York State which 

-resulted in the founding of "a University of a new type ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study." This com- 
bination of federal, state and private interests and resources is unique. 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

It gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policies 
of the University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

One field of service after another has found preparation for its 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an association 
between the Cornell University Medical College and The New York 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the two 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructed 
buildings of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the 
East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for nursing was 
first brought under the auspices of the University in July, 1942, when, 
by agreement between the Trustees of the University and the Gover 
nors of The New York Hospital, the School of. Nursing, long con 
ducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made a school 
within the University. 



Facilities for Instruction 

Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the 
Nursing School. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, 
laboratories and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching 
unit on the second floor of the Nurses Residence while others are pro 
vided in the Hospital and in the Cornell University Medical College 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all the 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various communit) 
agencies of the city. 

LIBRARIES 

The library of the School contains a wide selection of materials or 
nursing and related fields, including complete sets of importani 
medical and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. It is under the 
direction of a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library ol 
the Medical College are readily accessible and supplement those of the 
Nursing School in such a way as to make available unusual resources tc 
both the students and faculty of the School. A professionally preparec 
librarian is in charge in both libraries. Additional small libraries an 
adjacent to the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors in al 
departments. Through the New York Public Library, The National 
Health Library and others, valuable supplementary materials an 
placed at the disposal of instructors and students as needed. 



)jj 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 
WIDE EXPERIENCE IN CLINICAL SERVICES 



The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are superior for 
the care and study of patients. The Hospital is comprised of five clini- 
cal departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided not 
only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both in- 
patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for 
the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized clinical 
services are therefore available which are seldom found within a single 
organization. The Hospital has a capacity of over 1,200 beds and 
during the past year 23,076 patients were admitted, exclusive of new- 
borns. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives the 
student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the part 
io (which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. Authen- 
ticity of the findings in such studies depends in no small degree on the 
accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, observes 
and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the special- 
ties of tuberculosis, medical neurology and metabolism, urology, ear, 
nose and throat disorders, orthopedic, plastic and neuro-surgery, and 
opthalmology. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity of 207 adults and 
112 newborns and provides for obstetric and gynecologic patients. 
During the past year, 4,198 babies were born in this Hospital. 



le?t 



The Department of Pediatrics includes 98 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children and the services 
of a occupational therapist offer opportunities for the nursing student 
to study the development and guidance of convalescent as w r ell as sick 
children. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the 
'student works with and observes the development of normal child, and 
is thus better able to evaluate deviations from the normal which may 
accompany illness. 



L:I 



The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity 
of 108 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational 
3 . and recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of the 
mentally ill. The close connection between the psychiatric, medical 
and nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a 
consultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the 
relationship between mental and physical illness throughout her ex- 
perience in the Hospital. 



5 



10 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

OUT-PATIENT SERVICES 

The Out-Patient Department provides opportunity for the study 
of a large number of patients who come for general health 
supervision, diagnosis of disease and for treatment of disease that can 
be conducted on an ambulatory basis. Last year 254,988 patient visits 
were made to this Department. 

Students assist in diagnostic tests, in treatments and in teaching 
patients so that care without hospitalization can be effective. Arrange- 
ments for continuity of care through use of referrals to public health 
nursing agencies are an essential part of clinic experience. Opportunity 
is provided for participation in the guidance of expectant mothers 
through mother's classes and individual conferences and for study of 
the family approach to health maintenance and care of children. 

FIELD INSTRUCTION IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

Experience is provided in family health counseling, bedside nursing, 
and in the appropriate use of community agencies through cooperation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Visiting Nurse 
Association of Brooklyn. These agencies provide generalized family 
health services for patients in their homes. 

Additional experience in public health nursing in an official agency 
is available to a limited number of students through arrangements 
with the New York State Department of Health. Students with good 
scholastic records and a definite interest in public health nursing as a 
career are given preference among those who request this experience. 

Members of the staff of the New York City Department of Health 
plan with the faculty of the School for appropriate ways to contribute 
to the student program. The Kips Bay Yorkville Health Center serves 
the district in which the School of Nursing is located. It affords students 
an opportunity to observe the relationship between the New York 
City Department of Health and The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center. 



Admission 



GENERAL STATEMENT OF REQUIREMENTS 

Nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who have a 
deep interest in public service. Candidates are selected whose creden- 
tials indicate high rank in health, scholarship, maturity, ability to work 



ADMISSION 11 

with people, and who give evidence of personal fitness for nursing. A 
minimum of two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive of 
Physical Education) is required for admission. 

SELECTION OF A COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARS 

To meet the requirement of two years of college for admission, a 
very wide choice of colleges is available as the content of these two 
years is general liberal arts and may be taken in any university, college, 
or junior college accredited by one of the regional associations of 
colleges and secondary schools. Applicants may therefore take the first 
two years at any one of a great many colleges throughout the country 
or in one of the colleges of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. 
The work of the first two years required for admission to this school 
contains no nursing or "pre-nursing" courses and, therefore, selection 
of a college in which to take the first two years is NOT dependent 
upon its offering a pre-nursing program. 

Help in the selection of a college may be obtained by referring to 
the list of STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL which appears at the back 
of our School of Nursing bulletin as this list indicates the colleges from 
which students now in the School of Nursing have transferred. The 
list is, however, not a complete list of the colleges from which students 
may transfer. 

In selecting a college and registering for the courses of your first two 
years, read carefully the section below on Educational Requirements 
for Admission. 



EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Within the two-year liberal arts program of the first two college 
years required for admission, only 15 credits are in specified subjects 
as follows: 

Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Other subjects which make up a desirable preparation for admission 
to the School of Nursing but in which there is no specified requirement 
are: 

English, Literature, Sociology, Human Relations, History 
After planning for the above subjects, other subjects next in im- 
portance depending upon the special interest and abilities of the 
; student and the courses available are: 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Languages (may be of particular usefulness with patients and also 
for the many opportunities in international work and in 
advanced study) 

Anthropology, Economics, Physics 

Art, Music 

Additional courses in physical or biological sciences (for students 
taking more than 60 credits) 

However not more than 12 hours of biological science can be 
accepted toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for 
admission. 

The program in the School of Nursing requires the student to have 
a good background in English composition, communication skills, and 
use of the library. Courses which are not accepted as fulfilling the 
6-hour credit requirements in biological sciences are human anatomy, 
physiology, and bacteriology, as these courses are included in the 
professional program after admission to the School of Nursing. In 
general the principle applies that those courses given within the School 
of Nursing cannot be credited towards meeting admissions require- 
ments because there is no allowance within the School of Nursing 
program for electives which can be substituted for courses already 
taken. 

Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca should confer 
early with their advisors in the college in which they are registered or 
with the Office of the Dean of Women. Advisors will be glad to assist 
in planning a desirable program. These students as well as students in 
colleges other than Cornell should, however, communicate with the 
School of Nursing as indicated under Application for Admission. 
Each time you register for your courses during your first two 
years, it is suggested that you take this bulletin with you and review 
this section with your advisor. Applicants who do not meet in full the 
specific subject requirements for admission, but who have a good 
record of two or more years of college are encouraged to communicate 
with the School of Nursing for review of their credits and possible 
assistance in arranging for courses which can be taken in summer 
sessions. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifica- 
tions, there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is ex- 
pected that applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. 
The results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a 
dental examination must be submitted at the time of application. 



ADMISSION 13 

Inoculation against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox 
will be required of all students before admission to the School. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the 
form at the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain 
psychometric tests are required before admission. The applicant is 
asked to meet the charge of $5.00 for these tests. 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the appli- 
cation procedure. Effort is made to have the applicant meet with a 
member of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. 
If this is not practicable, a conference can often be arranged with an 
alumna or other qualified person living in the vicinity of the 
applicant's home or college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible edu- 
cational background preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal applica- 
tion should be made during the first term of the first college year 
if the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college year. 
When all application forms are received, including the report of the 
psychometric test and a transcript covering the first year of college 
work, and these appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted 
pending satisfactory fulfillment of all remaining requirements. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon 
notification of this provisional acceptance to the School. This assures 
that a place will be held for her in the entering class, pending satis- 
factory completion of all admission prerequisites. The full amount 
is credited toward fees payable at registration, but the deposit is not 
refundable if the applicant does not register. 



Promotion and Graduation 



Each term is 12 weeks in length and the established system of 
grading is a scale of F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. An 
average of C for each term is required for promotion without condi- 
tion. A grade of C is required in the courses Fundamentals of Nursing 
and Pharmacology I. A grade below C in any clinical field of nursing 
practice or a term average which is less than C places a student on 
condition. This must be removed by the end of the next term to insure 
further promotion. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the 
judgment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she 
can complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable period of 
time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the School unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, 
in which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the 
instructor, if the course is available. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the 
student to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory 
to it. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a 
Promotion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice 
and her relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into ac- 
count. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her 
work or who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the 
qualifications which are important for a good nurse may be put on 
condition or asked to withdraw from the School. The School reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of 
the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for nursing. The student is kept informed of her progress 
through frequent reports and individual term conferences, and every 
effort is made to provide assistance and guidance which will help her 
succeed in the program. 

14 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 15 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The Society of 
the New York Hospital. In order to qualify for the degree and diploma, 
the student must maintain a cumulative average of C for the three- 
year program, and must have completed satisfactorily all of the theory 
and practice outlined in this catalogue. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaurate degree before admis- 
sion may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience. An 
exemption may be granted up to a maximum of 12 weeks. An average 
of B in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for 
favorable consideration. Exemption must be requested at the begin- 
ning of the last term of the second year. 



Fees and Expenses 



Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as follows: 

First Second Third 

TUITION AND FEES Year Year Year Total 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $10.00 

Tuition 200.00 $150.00 $100.00 450.00 

Public Health Affiliation 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 3.00 3.00 3.00 9.00 

Health Service 12.00 12.00 12.00 36.00 

Hospitalization Insurance* 9.60 9.60 9.60 28.80 

Dental Service 4.00 4.00 4.00 12.00 

Graduation 25.00 25.00 

$268.60 $238.60 $153.60 $660.80 

UNIFORMS** (Subject to variation) 

Aprons & Accessories $ 40.52 $ 40.52 

Graduation Uniform $ 8.50 8.50 

Sweater 5.25 5.25 

Shoes 12.75 $ 12.75 25.50 

Scissors & Name Pin 3.37 3.37 

Rental of Laboratory Coat 1.00 1.00 

Rental of Public Health Uniform 5.00 5.00 

$ 62.89 $ 17.75 $ 8.50 $ 89.14 

OTHER REQUIRED EXPENSES 
(Subject to variation) 

Books & Manuals $ 55.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 75.00 

Field Trips 5.00 15.00 20.00 40.00 

Gymnasium Suit 8.75 8.75 

Student Activities & Handbook 6.25 5.25 5.25 16.75 

Board (first 24 weeks) 325.00 325.00 

$400.00 $ 30.25 $ 35.25 $465.50 
TOTAL FEES AND EXPENSES*** $731.49 $286.60 $197.35 $1215.44 

* The fee for hospitalization insurance (Associated Hospital Service-Blue Cross) is required of 
students holding this insurance at the time of admission as well as others. These students submit 
the certificate number when they register in the School and membership will be transferred. 
Refunds should be claimed by the student at the office of the former policy. The total cost 
of the hospitalization insurance is $19-20 but half of the policy is paid by The New York 
Hospital and half by the student. 
* * Expenses of uniforms over and above blue plaid uniform dresses and the cap which are 
supplied by the School. The cape ($21.75) is not listed because optional. 
• * * For those few senior students who are granted an additional elective experience of eight 
weeks with the N. Y. State Department of Health, there is an additional expense of 
approximately $260 (State stipends are sometimes available for this.) Payment for board in 
first 24 weeks becomes effective in Fall of 1954. 

16 



FEES AND EXPENSES 17 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon tentative acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is 
required. This is credited toward the tuition for the first year but is 
not refundable if the application is withdrawn. The remainder of 
the $200.00 tuition, amounting to $175.00, is payable at registration. 
All other first year fees are also payable on registration day. 

Students will be billed in advance for second and third year fees 
which become due on the first day of the Fall term of each year. These 
fees must be paid not later than twenty days after the date they are 
due. An exception is the fee for graduation which is due on the first 
day of the Summer term in the third year and is payable within 
twenty days of that date. This fee is refundable if the student is not 
graduated. The Student Organization fee is payable to the class 
treasurer. All fees and expenses incurred during the program must be 
paid before graduation. 

The School reserves the right to change its tuition and fees in 
amount, time, and manner of payment at any time without notice. 

None of the articles listed under "Other Expenses" should be ob- 
tained before admission to the School. Uniform accessories, shoes, and 
sweater will be ordered after registration and are paid for upon de- 
livery. A list of necessary personal equipment and the fees payable on 
registration day will be sent to each student shortly before registra- 
tion day. 

MAINTENANCE 

With the exceptions indicated below, each student receives main- 
tenance consisting of room, an allowance for meals, and a reasonable 
amount of laundry. During the first 24 weeks in the School (effective 
September 1954) the student meets the cost of her meals. During vaca- 
tions and when in the elective experience with the New York State 
Department of Health the student meets the entire cost of her mainte- 
nance. The uniform dresses and caps are provided for each student. 
These remain the property of the School and are returned on gradua- 
tion or withdrawal. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 

FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Committee for Scholarships of the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, a women's committee interested in 
the School, makes available a fund from which scholarships and grants- 
in-aid are awarded each year, usually in amounts of $100, $200, and 
$300. These scholarships are open to both entering students and 
students already in the School when need is a factor. They are awarded 
on the basis of the student's all-round record as indicated by academic 
work, participation in school and community activities, and qualities 
indicating promise of growth and a contribution to nursing. 

Application is made to the Dean. For entering students, application 
is made at the time of application for admission to the School, and 
grants are made on recommendation of the Admissions Committee. 
Awards are regarded as final only after the student has enrolled. Stu- 
dents already in the School should make application not later than 
May 15 for grants to be used in the following school year. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

Loans are available through this fund after the first term in the 
School for students who are in need of financial aid. Applications are 
made to the Dean and are accepted at any time. However, students 
are encouraged to plan as far as possible in the Spring for the follow- 
ing school year and to place applications by May 15. 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the School 
and in honor of Irene Sutliffe '80, Director of the School, 1886 to 
1902, scholarship grants are available to graduates of the School for 
post-graduate study. They are granted primarily to alumnae who are 
qualifying for positions connected with the School of Nursing. 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

A few scholarships are available from this fund, primarily for gradu- 
ate nurses. 

EMMA JEAN STEEL FULLER FUND 

This Fund, begun in 1952 by the Class of 1952 in memory of Emma 
jean Steel Fuller, a former member of the class, is available for an 
occasional scholarship. 

18 



SCHOLARSHIP AND FINANCIAL AID 19 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION — For additional information on 
scholarships and grants-in-aid available to students taking their first 
two years of academic work at Cornell in Ithaca, write to Scholarship 
Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

The following three scholarships for residents of New York State, 
making application while in high school, are available for the first 
two college years as well as for the School of Nursing. 

STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and aca- 
demies. Annual award $350 for each of four years while in attendence 
in any approved college in the State. This scholarship may therefore 
be used for the first two years of college required for admission to the 
School of Nursing, and continues for the first two years in the School 
of Nursing. Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local 
high school principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE WAR ORPHANS SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents 
of New York State who are graduates of its common schools and 
academies and who are children of deceased or disabled veterans of 
World War I. Annual award $350 towards tuition plus $100 for main- 
tenance for each of four years while in attendance in any approved 
college in the State. This scholarship may therefore be used for the 
first two years of college required for admission to the School of 
Nursing and continues for the first two years in the School of Nursing. 
Awarded on the basis of Regents examinations under regulations of 
the State Education Department. Apply to local high school principal, 
or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE CORNELL SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and aca- 
demies. Annual award $200 reduction in tuition for each of four 
years. This scholarship may be used by students who take the first 
two years of their academic work at Cornell in Ithaca and for the 
first two years in the School of Nursing. Awarded after a competitive 
examination. Apply to local high school principal, or to Commissioner 
of Education, Albany, N. Y. 



Health Service 



Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available to them a well-organized health service which is maintained 
under the general direction of a committee of the faculty and a school 
physician. Provision is also made for infirmary and hospital care. 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Upon admission to the School a physical examination by the school 
physician and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray 
is required every six months, and a physical examination during each 
school year. A Shick test is performed on all students after admission 
to the School; immunization to diphtheria is administered to those 
reacting positively. The Mantoux test is given during the pre-clinical 
period and, for those who are negative, is repeated at regular intervals. 
In addition, B.C.G. vaccine is provided to negative reactors. 

Beginning with the class admitted in the fall of 1952, students receive 
dental health service consisting of a full mouth series of X-rays, ex- 
amination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with suggestions for treat- 
ment, and follow-up supervision. For repair of dental defects, students 
are referred to their own dentists. 

An infirmary is maintained in the Residence. Infirmary care is 
provided for short-term minor illness. For more serious illness, students 
are taken care of in The New York Hospital within the limits of the 
Hospital's policy on admissions and bed usage, and hospitalization up 
to the amount of eight weeks for any one admission is provided. 
Elective surgery is not included and if not taken care of before admis- 
sion to the School must be arranged during vacations. Expenses for 
private nurses, transfusions and personal items are borne by the 
student. The School reserves the right to collect all hospitalization 
benefits available through third parties for any period of care coming 
within the provisions of these benefits. 

The fees for health service, dental service and hospitalization insur- 
ance are listed under school fees in this bulletin. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a stu- 
dent's health makes it unwise for her to remain in the school, she may 
be required to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any 
time. 

Vacations and Absences 

A vacation of four weeks is given each year in the first and second 
year, three weeks in the third year. Students entering with a bac- 
calaureate degree, who have an exemption of time, may have a slightly 
shorter vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged to con- 
form to the requirements of the program but usually fall within the 
Summer months. 

Because of the nature of assignments, a leave of absence usually 
necessitates absence for an entire term. As result of absence, a student 
may be required to re-register for a course of study or a nursing practice 
period, or she may be transferred to a later class. 



Student Life and Activities 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence adjacent to the Hospital. 
Every effort has been made in the construction and equipment of the 
Residence to provide for the normal and healthy life of students and 
staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively fur- 
nished single rooms with running water. Each floor has ample baths, 
showers, and toilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room 
with adjoining kitchenette for informal gatherings. 



RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

A large auditorium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun 
roofs, a television set and a hobby room are also available. Pianos are 
available for student use. Student activities planned jointly with the 
Cornell University Medical College are a regular part of the recreation 
and include glee club and dramatic productions. 

Bv arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in soecial sports events. Beach 
equipment and an outdoor grill are available. 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities, a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of represenatives of those living in the Residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for 
friends and relatives at a nominal charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless 
in music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Com- 

21 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

mittee, students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities 
as membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum 
of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The 
Blue Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships, the 
Christian Nurses' Fellowship and the Newman Club. Guest speakers 
and planned forums provide an opportunity for exchange of thought 
on many subjects. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule 
which is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all stu- 
dents. The Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, 
Judicial Council and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on 
Student Affairs acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organiza- 
tion and, with the Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty 
meetings which provide for informal discussions of school activities 
and problems. 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one 
or more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater 
problem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course 
of study, freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature 
is important. For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a 
student who is contemplating marriage during her period in the School 
to discuss her proposed plans with the Dean or her representative and 
to obtain permission to remain in the School. 

A married student, if she so requests, will be given permission to live 
outside the Residence after her first six months in the School provided, 
in the judgment of the School, this will not interfere with her School 
responsibilities. The faculty record their belief that responsibility for 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 23 

maintaining the quality of her work and for her continuing participa- 
tion in school activities must be accepted by the student. Married 
applicants are accepted if in the judgment of the Admissions Com- 
mittee they meet these requirements. Students anticipating marriage 
should make plans which will fit into their regular vacation schedule, 
as leave of absence can rarely be granted except for an entire term. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The School maintains active counseling services which are available 
at all times to any student who needs assistance, either in connection 
with routine matters that may come up in her normal work in the 
School or in connection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that 
those students who need help on questions of educational program, 
finances, health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to 
those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for 
any student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase 
of her life while in the School of Nursing. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national 
professional organization of nurses first known as the Nurses Associ- 
ated Alumnae of the United States and Canada, now the American 
Nurses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part 
of the Cornell University Alumni Association. 



The Basic Nursing Program 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 11 and 12. 
Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry — (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects 45 

Total (Pre -Professional) 60 

PROFESSIONAL (3 years) . In the School of Nursing. 

Semester Hours Credit 

Units: I II III IV 

Orientation (No credit) 

Physical Education (No credit) 

Biological Science 7 

Biochemical Science 3 

Social Science 5 

Nutrition 1.5 

Pharmacology 2.5 

Fundamentals of Nursing 9 

Clinical Nursing 

Total (Professional) 28 

Grand Total (Required for B.S. in Nursing) 



THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of three calendar years. 
In each clinical service, related classes, conferences, and bedside instruc- 
tions are given concurrently with practice and emphasis is placed on 
disease prevention, health instruction and rehabilitation. The student 
receives selected experiences in evening and night duty. An introduc- 
tion to community nursing is provided through conferences and 



24 



2 


1.5 
1.5 

2 


2 




31 


24 


8 




33 


29 


10 


100 
160 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 25 

observation in various agencies assisting with health problems. The 
student participates in discussions centering around family health 
and assists in the referral of patients requiring nursing care after 
hospital discharge. An eight-week period of supervised practice in 
family health service is provided through affiliation with the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum 
as the need arises. The professional programs, devided into four units 
of theory and experience, follows. 



UNIT I 

This unit consists of 24 weeks which are devoted primarily to class 
and laboratory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice 
in the pavilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at 
Christmastime. Following are the courses presented: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Orientation 120 14 

Fundamentals of Nursing 121 325 7 

Pharmacology I 122 15 0.5 

Pharmacology II 123 30 2 

Anatomy 100 60 2.5 

Physiology 101 45 2.5 

Biochemistry 102 60 3 

Microbiology 103 45 2 

Introduction To Clinical Nursing 124 30 2 

Psychological Principles in the Practice of Nursing. 110 30 2 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing Ill 30 2 

Professional Problems I 113 15 1 

Nutrition 130 11 0.5 

Diet Therapy and Cooking 131 36 1 

Physical Education 10 42 

Total 788 28 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

UNIT II 

During Unit II, which is 52 weeks in length, the student is assigned 
to five clinical areas for theory and practice. These include the Out- 
patient Department, the Operating Rooms, Medicine, Surgery and 
Obstetrics. A vacation of three weeks is given in the summer. 

In the Out-Patient Department the student has an opportunity to 
learn something of the medical and nursing needs of patients who are, 
for the most part, carrying on their usual life activities, while being 
treated for some health problem, or learning to live with some physical 
limitation. She is assigned to the clinics of medicine, surgery and 
pediatrics. During her in-patient experience on the medical and sur- 
gical services, she has experience not only on the "general" services 
but in such specialties as ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology 
and neurosurgery. 

It is not anticipated that the student will develop a high degree of 
technical skill in the operating room. However, through supervised 
practice and observations at the field of operation, and by participating 
in the care of patients in the Recovery Room, the ground work is laid 
for understanding of the nurse's responsibilities to the patient, not only 
during the operation, but immediately preceding and following it. 

In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for practice include experience 
in the more traditional types of obstetric service as well as activities 
related to the newer concepts of maternal and newborn care, which 
are embodied in such terms as "preparation for labor" and "rooming- 
in." The student's practice includes the Out-Patient Department, de- 
livery floor, nursery and postpartum unit. 

The program for this Unit is as follows: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Medicine 140 18 1 

Principles of Medical Nursing 141 36 2.5 

Practice of Medical Nursing 119 12 3 

Surgery 150 15 1 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 151 42 3 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 152 12 3 

Obstetrics 160 20 1.5 

Principles of Obstetric Nursing 161 58 4 

Practice of Obstetric Nursing 162 12 3 

Medical Care in the Out-Patient Dept. 118 12 1 

Principles of Nurs. in the Out-Patient Dept. 118-A 28 2 

Practice of Nurs. in the Out-Patient Dept. 119 6 1.5 

Principles of Operating Room Nursing 157 45 3 

Practice of Operating Room Nursing 158 6 1.5 

Historical Backgrounds of Nursing 112 30 2 

Physical Education 10 36 

340~ 48 33 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 27 

UNIT III 

This Unit is also 52 weeks in length and there is a four-week vaca- 
tion during the summer term. An eight-week affiliation with the Visit- 
ing Nurse Service of New York, a family health agency, provides an 
opportunity for the student to care for patients in their homes and to 
teach members of the family to give necessary care between visits 
of the nurse. 

During another eight-week unit of time the student considers the 
special nursing problems related to the care of patients with long- 
term illnesses, including tuberculosis. She visits various agencies and 
facilities in the community which offer services to the aged and to 
those with special handicaps, such as cerebral palsy. A 12-week 
assignment to the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Develop- 
ment includes experience in Nursery School, the premature nursery, 
the infant floor and the unit for older children. A similar 12-week 
period is spent in the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic where the 
student gains a keen appreciation of the causes of mental and emo- 
tional illness, of the ways in which such illness may be prevented, and 
knowledge of the newer methods of therapy for its relief. 

Experience is provided in Diet Therapy and in Urological Nursing. 

The Program for this Unit is as follows: 

Course 

Subject No. 

Pediatrics 170 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 171 

Practice of Pediatric Nursing 172 

Psychiatry 180 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 181 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 182 

Family Community Health 115 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 116 

Practice of Public Health Nursing 117 

Chronic Illness and Tuberculosis 141 

Practice in Nursing in Chronic Illness 144 

Principles of Urological Nursing 153 

Practice of Urological Nursing 154 

Diet Therapy Conferences 132 

Diet Therapy Practice 133 

Physical Education 10 12 

Total 277 48 29 



Hours 


Wks. 


Cr. 


12 




1 


63 




4 




12 


3 


35 




2 


61 




4 




12 


3 


20 




1.5 


36 




2 




8 


2 


15 




1 




8 


2 


15 


4 


1 


8 




0.5 




4 


1 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

UNIT IV 

This last Unit of the professional program is approximately 27 weeks 
long, including a vacation of 23 days. 

There is a four-week assignment to the Private Patient Service, an 
experience incorporating the nursing care of patients who are being 
treated for Gynecological conditions. During another four-week period 
attention is given to the special needs of orthopedic patients and to 
the facilities and services available in the Medical Center and in the 
community for their treatment and rehabilitation. 

The student is now ready to accept almost complete responsibility 
for analysing and planning to meet the nursing needs of selected 
patients. She returns for eight weeks to one of the services on which 
she has had experience as a younger student and under supervision, 
carries out the nursing care of some of the sickest patients. She func- 
tions as leader of the nursing "team" and is asssigned to charge duty 
on a pavilion for limited periods of the day or night. 

It is during this last Unit that each student selects a special area of 
nursing for concentrated attention and exploration. She may choose 
from nursing departments in the Medical Center and also from other 
agencies in the Community. Each year a few students who are especi- 
ally interested in Public Health Nursing have the opportunity for 
experience with the New York State Department of Health. 

Courses and experience in Unit IV are: 

Course 

Subject No. Hours Wks. Cr. 

Principles of Orthopedic Nursing 155 15 1 

Practice of Orthopedic Nursing 156 4 1 

Care of Gynecologic (Private) Patients 145 12 4 2 

Senior Experience 126 8 2 

Elective Experience 127 8 2 

Ward Activities and Relationships 125 15 1 

Professional Problems II 114 15 1 

Total 57 24 10 

( + 5 days) 

Grand Total (Professional Program) 1462 120 100 

( + 5 days) 




A student makes friends with a small patient she is weighing in the Well-Baby 
Clinic of the Hospital. 




During her field assignment in Public Health Nursing, the student goes out into 
the community for experience in family health problems and care of the sick 
in their homes. 



Description of Courses 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 14-15.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. This course aims to develop in the student an interest 

in good body mechanics in work and play, and to teach her how she may apply 

this knowledge in her patient care. It also aims to develop interest and skill in 

those individual activities which will enable her to use her leisure time to greater 

advantage. 

90 Hours (Total) . First and Second Years. Miss McDERMOTT, Miss HIRSHBERG. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY . This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information 
is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. HINSEY, Dr. BERRY, Dr. ANDERSON, Miss WRIGHT. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course consists of a study of the physiological systems and 
their integration into the total functions of the human body. It is closely related 
to the course in Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. PITTS, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss BARRETT, Miss 
KROOG, Mrs. ZARNFALLER. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism 
of food, and the composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. du YIGNEAD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GENGHOF, 
Miss KROOG, Mrs. ZARNFALLER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES IN THE PRACTICE OF NURSING. A 
problem-centered approach to the psychological needs of patients, including con- 
sideration of the biological and sociological factors contributing to these needs. 
The various stages of personality development and emotional responses to physical 
illness are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the nurse-patient relationship and the 
adjustment of the individual student to the nursing profession. 
30 Hours. First Year. Dr. KUTNER. 

29 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. This course is planned 
concurrently with Fundamentals of Nursing to develop the student's ability to 
observe, understand and communicate with patients and their families and to plan 
nursing in relation to individual needs. The student is introduced to cultural and 
environmental factors which influence health and illness. The broad aspects of 
community organization are presented in a way that enables a student to see the 
relationship between the patient, the hospital, and the community. 

30 Hours. First Year. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss SOULE. 

112. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF NURSING. An overview of the history 
of nursing from earliest times to the present, studying what has constituted nursing 
and tracing factors which have strengthened or weakened it. Presented against a 
background of developments in the general care and welfare of the sick such as 
the care of mothers and children, old people and the chronically ill, the mentally 
ill, the tuberculous, and the evolution of hospitals, medicine and public health. 
30 Hours. Second Year. Miss DUNBAR and special lecturers. 

113. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS I. Consideration of the philosophical and ethical 
foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. Problems 
related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are presented by 
the instructor and the students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours. First Year. Miss LYONS. 

114. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS II. A survey of the nursing field, particularly 
the place of the professional organizations, legislation affecting nursing, economics 
of medical and nursing care, the role of the practical nurse, placement and coun- 
seling agencies, periodicals and international aspects of nursing. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss DUNBAR. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

115. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. An introduction to public health 
nursing in relation to the health program as a whole. Consideration is given to 
the increasing responsibility of the nurse as a member of the health team. 

20 Hours. Second or Third Year. Dr. SMILLIE, Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

116. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Emphasis is placed on 
developing an understanding of over-all policies, principles and functions as these 
relate to public health nursing practice. In addition, each student participates in 
four to six group discussion meetings of approximately two hours each, considering 
family situations known to them. The purpose of these group discussions is to 
strengthen and deepen their appreciation and understanding of the public health 
nurse's functions. 

30 Hours. Second or Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and stafE. 

117. PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Activities include health super- 
vision of infants, school and pre-school children, and adults; maternity nursing, 
morbidity nursing in the home. Through carefully graded observation, individual 
conferences, family study and case conferences, and supervised practice, the student 
is given increasing responsibility for health work with a small, selected group of 
families. This experience is gained through affiliation with the Visiting Nurse 
Service of New York, which provides a generalized public health nursing service 
including bedside care of the sick in their homes. 

8 Weeks. Second or Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 
(Elective Experience in Public Health Nursing: A few senior stude?its who have an 
outstanding record in general and who have shown particular interest and ability 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

in Public Health Nursi?ig may be offered the opportunity for an elective experience 
with the New York State Department of Health for a period of eight weeks.) 

OUT-PATIENT NURSING 

118. MEDICAL CARE IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Lectures deal 
with the medical management of patients, both children and adults, whose diseases 
are treated largely on an ambulatory basis. The overall significance of disease to 
the community is considered. 

12 Hours. First or Second Year. Dr. BARR, Dr. GLENN, Dr. LEVINE and staffs. 

118A. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 
Nursing care of ambulatory patients, both children and adults, is taught through 
lecture, demonstration and informal family-centered conferences. Emphasis is placed 
upon use of community resources in insuring comprehensive patient care, and upon 
the nurse's contribution to general health maintenance and to the prevention and 
control of disease. 

28 Hours. First or Second Year. Miss NEWTON, Miss BUTALL, Miss McINTYRE, 
Miss McMULLAN, Miss SCHWARTZ. 

119. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Selected 
clinics provide experience in the pediatric, medical and surgical services. The 
student is helped to understand the value of continutity of patient care through 
working closely with other departments of the hospital and with community 
agencies. 

6 Weeks. First or Second Year. Miss NEWTON, Miss BUTALL, Miss McINTYRE, 
Miss McMULLAN, Miss SCHWARTZ. 

FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND ALLIED COURSES 

120. ORIENTATION. These discussions give the beginning student a general 
concept of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the 
individual who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical 
and mental health of the nurses as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in 
her work. 

15 Hours. (First Year 12 Hours; Second Year li/ 2 Hours; Third Year li/ 2 Hours.) 
Miss DUNBAR, Miss FREDERICK, Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss 
McDERMOTT, Dr. BOWE. 

121. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING. This course is an introduction to nursing 
and to the various components which are an integral part of health maintenance 
and of the diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is designed to be a foundation 
for all the clinical nursing courses. Following an introductory unit which helps 
the student understand some basic concepts in nursing, the program is developed 
on a patient-activity basis. The student first learns to care for patients who are 
primarily ambulatory, either up and about in the hospital or visiting the Out- 
patient Department. Then the student becomes concerned with patients who are 
in bed but who enjoy a great deal of freedom of activity. From the care of such 
patients, the emphasis then proceeds to the care of patients who are on complete 
bed rest. While the major content of the course is concerned with basic nursing 
procedures used in the hygienic care of the patient, in the diagnosis of disease 
conditions and in the treatment of various illnesses, a great deal of emphasis is 
also placed on the socio-dynamic factors in nursing. Emphasis is given to inter- 
personal relationships, age and emotional problems and problems of chronic and 
acute illness not only in the hospital but also in the general community. Beginning 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

the tenth week in the program students have limited periods of supervised practice 
in the clinical divisions of Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Out-Patient. 
185 Hours. First Year. Miss FUERST, Miss VAN ARSDALE, Miss JONES, Miss 
BIELSKI, Miss KURIHARA. 

122. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems 
used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calculating 
dosages. 

15 Hours. First Year. Miss PLACE. 

123. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowl- 
edge of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the 
nurse in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and 
commonly used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, adminis- 
tration, and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the importance of accurate 
administration of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. FERGUSON. 

124. INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL NURSING. This course is designed to 
center the student's attention upon the need for informed observations. Conditions 
commonly found on all clinical services are considered, i.e. pain, fever, uncon- 
sciousness; the patho-genesis underlying symptoms is explored. Laboratory specimens 
and films are used extensively and there is frequent patient participation. Nursing 
and medical classes are closely correlated in an effort to help the young student 
begin to analyze the nursing needs of patients as manifested by the signs and 
symptoms of illness. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. KELLNER and staff. Nursing faculty from all services. 

125. WARD ACTIVITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS. Consideration is given to the 
basic principles which underlie effective working relationships with professional 
and non-professional personnel. The student is also guided in recognizing and plan- 
ping for the use of learning situations as they relate to patients or younger students, 
and she is introduced to the activities which she will undertake when assigned to 
act as team leader and to senior charge duty. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss HARMON. 

126. SENIOR EXPERIENCE. Each student returns to the service on which she had 
her first clinical experience. She plans and carries out the care of patients with 
complex nursing needs, and has opportunity to observe and participate in the 
management of the pavilion, including leadership in the nursing team made up 
of nursing and auxiliary personnel. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. Faculty from all clinical services. 

127. ELECTIVE EXPERIENCE. Opportunity is provided for the student to explore 
a special area of nursing in which she is particularly interested. This may include 
one or more of the units in the Medical Center or other agencies in the community. 
A few students may have the opportunity for experience with the New York State 
Department of Health. The student is guided in making a study of some limited 
aspect of the field which she has chosen. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. All faculty members. 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION. A short course in normal adult nutrition based on the courses 
in Biochemistry and Physiology. A study of the functions and food sources of the 
major food groups, their availability in the world and in the community, the needs 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

of the individual and the relationship of cultural patterns to food habits and nutri- 
tion are included. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy 
are discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services.) 
Lecture and recitation. 

11 Hours. First Year. Miss RYXBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

131. DIET THERAPY AND COOKING. A course designed to present the under- 
lying principles in the treatment of disease by diet. It is accompanied by labora- 
tory work in principles of food preparation, and in the preparation of foods and 
meals included in therapeutic diets. The course is supplemented by conference work 
during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lecture, laboratory 
and recitation. 

36 Hours. First Year. Miss RYXBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

132. DIET THERAPY CONFERENCES. Through conference discussions, inte- 
grated with the practice assignment, the student is oriented to the practical applica- 
tion of her knowledge of nutrition and diet therapy in the care of hospitalized 
and ambulatory patients. 

8 Hours. Second or Third Year. Miss RYXBERGEX. 

133. DIET THERAPY PRACTICE. The application of the principles of diet- 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions and out- 
patient clinics of the Hospital. 

4 Weeks. Second or Third Year. Miss STEPHEXSOX, Miss RYXBERGEN, Miss 
KROOG. Miss RICHMOND, Miss HANSTED. Mrs. RUBEL. 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of disease are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented with supplement, emphasize, and interpret required 
reading covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course path- 
ology, complications, treatment, progonsis, and prevention. 

18 Hours. First or Second Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

141. CHRONIC ILLNESS AND TUBERCULOSIS. This course deals with the 
causes, treatment, prognosis and prevention of some typical conditions and diseases 
which incapacitate individuals for long periods. Special consideration is given to 
tuberculosis, degenerative diseases and aging. Special nursing problems are con- 
sidered. 

15 Hours. Second or Third Year. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING. The principles and methods of nurs- 
ing care for patients with medical, neurogical, and communicable disease are 
considered. 

36 Hours. First or Second Year. Miss KINCH, Miss HUGHES, Miss BROOKS, Miss 
PLACE, Miss STIRLING. 

143. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING. INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL 
NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of medical nursing 
principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical and neurological 
pavilions of the Hospital. 

12 Weeks. First or Second Year. Miss BROOKS, Miss KINCH, Miss HUGHES. 
Miss STIRLING, Miss PLACE, Miss FAWCETT, Miss LIO, Miss CHRISTIAN, 
Mrs. BROCKMAN. 



34 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

144. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN CHRONIC ILLNESS. This experience includes 
the care of patients with tuberculosis. It consists of practice in the Hospital as 
well as observations and field trips to many types of community agencies which 
cooperate in providing the care and rehabilitation services needed by these patients. 
Consideration is given to the particular contribution which the nurse can make 
in her relationships with patients and with health workers from other fields. 

8 Weeks. Second or Third Year. 

145. CARE OF GYNECOLOGIC AND PRIVATE PATIENTS. This experience 
offers an opportunity for the student to become aware of the needs of patients 
with a wide variety of socio-economic backgrounds. By means of supervised prac- 
tice, the student also gains an appreciation of the varied methods of treating 
patients with the same diagnosis. Included in this experience are classes and prac- 
tice in the care of patients with gynecologic conditions. 

12 Hours. 4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss POOR, Miss AGNEW, Miss MEYEROWITZ. 

SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Conditions requiring surgical treatment, their predisposing and 
causitive factors, the selective surgical treatment, the pre- and post-operative man- 
agement, including the essential observations by the nurse, are presented in lectures 
and clinics. 

15 Hours. First or Second Year. Dr. GLENN, and staff. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. The fundamental principles of the 
nursing care of patients with general surgical conditions, including surgical condi- 
tions of the eye, ear, nose, and throat, and of the nervous system, are presented by 
lecture and demonstration. Emphasis is placed upon the recognition of early symp- 
toms of disease, upon individualization of care including instruction and rehabili- 
tation of the patient. 

42 Hours. First or Second Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss DERICKS, Miss FOSTER, Miss 
HENDERSON, Miss NIELSEN, Miss SWANWICK. 

152. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. Planned experience in the application 
of nursing principles to the care of patients with general or special surgical con- 
ditions. This includes practice in surgical asepsis, patient teaching, therapeutic 
team relationships and in planning to meet patient's needs after discharge from 
the hospital. 

12 Weeks. First or Second Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss DERICKS, Miss FOSTER, Miss 
HENDERSON, Miss NIELSEN, Mrs. KENNEY, Miss HEYMANN, Miss SABIA. 

153. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. The anomalies and diseases of 
the genito-urinary tract are described and principles underlying the management 
and nursing care of these conditions are presented. Preparation of the patient for 
self-care on discharge is stressed. 

15 Hours. Second or Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss SWANWICK, Mrs. KENNEY, 
Miss HEYMANN. 

154. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Opportunity is provided for the 
development of understanding and skill in meeting the special nursing needs of 
patients with urological conditions during the pre- and post-operative phase with 
particular attention to the patient's need after discharge. 

4 Weeks. Second or Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss SWANWICK, Mrs, KENNEY, 
Miss HEYMANN. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 35 

155. PRINCIPLES OF ORTHOPEDIC NURSING. Consideration of the medical 
and nursing problems peculiar to those patients who are undergoing treatment 
for the correction of skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Emphasis is placed on 
prevention and rehabilitation, and the nursing principles which are adaptable 
to the care of all patients. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Faculty from the Schools of Medicine and Nursing. 

156. PRACTICE IN ORTHOPEDIC AND REHABILITATIVE NURSING. Ex- 
perience includes the care of both ambulatory and hospitalized patients. Through 
field trips the student has an opportunity to become familiar with the many 
services needed by the orthopedically handicapped and with the agencies providing 
those services. 

4 Weeks. Third Year 

OPERATING ROOM NURSING 

157. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, dis- 
cussions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods of 
aseptic technique in relation to the care of patients at the time of operation. 
Immediate post-operative care is included. 

45 Hours. First or Second Year. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss SAFFIOTI, Miss HAWKINS, 
Miss JONES. 

158. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Supervised clinical ex- 
perience and study of the application of nursing principles to the care of patients 
in the Operating Room. Students are given the opportunity to observe and assist 
with operative procedures, to relate this experience to the total care of surgical 
patients and to gain an appreciation of the qualities and abilities essential to 
effective nursing in this field. Experience in the Recovery Unit is offered at 
this time. 

6 Weeks. First or Second Year. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss SAFFIOTI, Miss HAWKINS, 
Miss JONES, and staff. 

OBSTETRIC NURSING 

160. OBSTRETICS. A lecture course planned to focus the student's general knowl- 
edge of anatomy and physiology on the generative processes, and on the unique 
characteristics of the human infant. The emotional aspects of child-bearing, and a 
family-centered point of view provide additional basis for integrating earlier founda- 
tion courses with this clinical specialty. 

20 Hours. First or Second Year. Dr. DOUGLAS, and staff. 

161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRIC NURSING. The student is guided in applica- 
tion of theoretical knowledge to the nursing care of patients before, during, and 
after the birth of the baby. The conference method encourages the student in self- 
expression as her understanding of the physical changes, adjustments, and reac- 
tions of the patient develops. Teaching techniques and attitudes are fostered by 
example and by explanation. 

58 Hours. First or Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss BOYLE, 
Miss CRAMER, Mrs. WHITE, Miss KEANE, Mrs. MIGUEL, Miss ROBERTSON, 
Miss RYNBERGEN, Mrs. WILSON. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC NURSING. Students observe and care for 
mothers and new-born infants under supervision and with bedside instruction in 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

the various techniques. Practice areas include out-patient department, labor and 

delivery rooms, newborn nurseries and rooming-in units, and the postpartal 

pavilions. 

12 Weeks. First or Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss BOYLE, 

Miss CRAMER, Mrs. WHITE, Miss KEANE, Mrs. MIGUEL, Miss ROBERTSON, 

Miss RYNBERGEN, Mrs. WILSON. 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and 
disease. 

12 Hours. Second or Third Year. Dr. LEVINE and staff. 

171. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the appli- 
cation of knowledge and understanding of ways of meetings the child's needs in 
health and during illness; the basic principles in nursing of children and the effects 
of illness on the child and his family. Lectures, case presentations, panel discussions, 
films, and role playing. 

63 Hours. Second or Third Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss STOKES, Miss GOULET, 
Miss TSCHIDA, Miss RYNBERGEN, and staff. 

172. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the appli- 
cation of knowledge to the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, 
and children in Nursery School. Group conferences, demonstrations, and nursing 
care plans. 

12 Weeks. Second or Third Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss GOULET, Miss STOKES, 
Miss TSCHIDA, Miss DON DERO, Miss FRIPP, Miss SIMMONS, Miss TERRY, 
Miss ANDERSON, Miss PEARSON and staff, and the staff of THE DIVISION 
OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. This course is designed to acquaint the students with the path- 
ology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. The psychiatric problems frequently 
encountered in infancy, childhood, adolescence, the aging period and senility are 
discussed. An historical survey of the development of psychiatry and the mental 
hygiene movement is offered. The nursing student is introduced to the work of 
allied health professions and social agencies concerned with helping people to attain 
health and prevent illness. 

35 Hours. Second or Third Year. Dr. DIETHELM, and staff. 

181. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The purpose of this course is to 
help the student gain an understanding of the basic principles in the nursing care 
of patients with personality disorders and the nursing techniques utilized in their 
treatment. Field trips are planned to acquaint the student with some of the com- 
munity facilities which are devoted to rehabilitation, as well as the prevention and 
treatment of psychiatric illnesses. Psychiatric social service and out-patient psychiatric 
services are included in the student's community study. The principles and tech- 
niques of occupational and recreational therapies are taught and practiced so that 
the student may help the patient in rehabilitation. The whole program is oriented 
to help develop in the student understanding of self and relationships to others; an 
objective attitude toward emotional disorders; and a broader appreciation of the 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 37 

inter-relationships between the environmental, somatic, emotional, and constitutional 
factors that influence mental health. 

61 Hours. Second or Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss MUHS, Miss FRANY, Miss 
SMITH, Miss SPARGO, Miss NEWBURG, Mrs. SIMON, and staff. 

182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. Consists of supervised experience 
in the observation and care of emotionally ill adult and adolescent patients during 
the acute phase of illness, as well as during convalescence. There are also scheduled 
demonstrations, conferences and seminars to help the student gain competence in 
clinical nursing practice. The student participates in currently approved therapies 
which include: psychotherapy, occupational, recreational, insulin, electro-convulsive 
and other somatic procedures. In each therapy there is particular emphasis on the 
needs of the individual. 

12 Weeks. Second or Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss MUHS, Miss FRANY, Miss 
SMITH, Miss SPARGO, Miss NEWBURG, Miss PAIGE, and staff. 



Administration 

JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL- 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 



Neal Dow Becker 
Arthur H. Dean 

Deane W. Malott, President of the 
University 

Hamilton Hadley, Vice-President 
Henry S. Sturgis, Vice-President for 

Finance 
John Hay Whitney, President of The 

Society of the New York Hospital 

John W. Davis 
Joseph C. Hinsey, Director 



Board of Trustees 

of 
Cornell University 



Board of Governors of 

The Society of 
the New York Hospital 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

F. F. Hill, Chairman Provost of Cornell University 

Deane W. Malott President of Cornell University 

Preston A. Wade ] „ , ~ ,, TT . 

„ y 1 rustees of Cornell University 

Ruth Irish j ' J 

Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr I Governors of The Society of 

Mrs. Charles S. Payson f the New York Hospital 

David P. Barr President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-large 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

Joseph C. Hinsey Director, The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 

Elizabeth Ogden, '44 Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Henry N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York 

Wilson G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive 

Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 

38 



ADMINISTRATION 39 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D. President of Cornell 

University 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Associate Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Claire Calhoun, M.A Assistant Director of the Residence 

Jane Bevan, A.B Assistant in Public Relations 

Mary Jo Monroe, B.A., B.S. in L.S. Librarian 

Mrs. Zdislava M. Kohak, Ph.D Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Gould Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki, A.B Secretary to the Dean 

Ruth Bowe, M.D School Physician 

Mrs. Elizabeth Phillips Squier, A.B., R.N. 

Supervisor, Nurses' Health Service 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Poor, Secretary 

Dr. Barr Dr. Hinsey Miss Newton Miss Tuffley 

Miss Carbery Miss Klein Mrs. Overholser Mrs. Wright 
Miss Hickox Miss Lyons Miss Schubert 

CHAIRMAN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss Mallory 

Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Library Miss Brooks 

Records Miss Walters 

Student Affairs Miss Stirling 

Scholarships Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: 

First Year Miss Rynbergen 

Second Year Mrs. White 

Third Year Miss Swanwick 

Student and Staff Health Mrs. Overholser 

Affiliating Students Miss Goulet 

Principles and Practices of Nursing Miss Nielsen 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Muriel Carbery '37 President 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. Gervais W. McAuliffe Chairman 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Office of Dean of Men, Dean of Women Caroline Hawes 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

College of Home Economics Jean Failing 

Associate Professor of Home Economics, Student Counselor 

College of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

Rollin L. Perry 

Chairman, Advisory Board of Underclassmen 

College of Agriculture Howard S. Tyler 

Professor in Personnel Administration 
in charge of Vocational Guidance Placement 

Office of Admissions Robert Storandt 

Associate Director 






Faculty 



Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

(Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
< Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of 
Nursing. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
ospital School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia University, 1930. Diploma, 
Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, London, 
England, 1936.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

erda F. Hickcox, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
'resbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
ersity, 1927; M.A., 1951. Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of 
urgical Nursitig Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
Cursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936; M.A., 1951.) 

eronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Di- 
loma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

o-hleen Newton, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; Head of 
)ut-Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. [Anatomy], University of Washington, 1934; 
.S. in Nursing, University of Washington, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

argery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 

hector of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hos- 
ital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 
944. ) 

iENDERiKA J. Rynbergen, M.S., Associate Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons Col- 
ege, 1922; M.S., Cornell University, 1938.) 

Ignes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of 

Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in 

Cursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia 
Jniversity, 1932.) 

41 



42 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Elizabeth U. Wright, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing; 
Director of Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mass- 
achusetts General Hospital, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 1948.) 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Muriel Carbery, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing 
Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1951.) 

Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B., University of Illinois, 1920; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1926.) 

Elinor Fuerst, M.M., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Christ Hospital School of Nursing, Jersey City, N. J., 1937; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1946; M.A., 1951.) 

Lucille Notter, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor in Public Health Nursing; Director, 
Joint Educational Program, Visiting Nurse Service of New York and Visiting Nurse 
Association of Brooklyn. (Diploma in Nursing, Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital 
School of Nursing, Louisville, Ky., 1931; B.S., Columbia University, 1941; M.A., 
1946.) 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director 
Nurses' Residence. (Diploma, Bouve-Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; B.S., 
New York University, 1930; M.A., 1932.) 

M. Eva Poor, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing; 
Head of Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B. Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 
1950.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School of 
Nursing, Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1949.) 

INSTRUCTORS 

Mildred Elizabeth Beisel, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing. § ( i 
(Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., [r 
New York University, 1944; M.A., 1946.) L 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing; k 
Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Moses \'i 
Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Columbia University,!^ 

1945. ;L; 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Acting Department ° 
Head, Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939, 
B.S., 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Justine C. Buttal, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Philadelphia General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1939; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1950) 



FACULTY 43 

♦Berniece Cramer, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Evening Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, Hastings, Nebraska, 
1944; B.A., Hastings College, Nebraska, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1951.) 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N. Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Constance Derrell, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lin- 
coln School of Nursing, New York, 1938; B.S., New York University, 1945; Midwifery 
Certificate, Tuskegee Institute, Oklahoma, 1946; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1948.) 

Mary J. Foster, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1944; M.N., Yale University School 
of Nursing, 1947.) 

Eleanor Frany, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychia- 
tric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hackensack Hospital School of Nursing, 
Hackensack, New Jersey, 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; M.A., 1952.) 

Nancy Goulet, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 
1946; B.S., McCoy College, Johns Hopkins University, 1951.) 

Elizabeth Harmon, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing; Assistant Director of Nursing 
Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Pres- 
bysterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; M.A., Columbia University, 
1951.) 

Mary L. Hawkins, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland School of Nursing, Oakland, 
Calif., 1942; B.S., University of California, 1951; M.S., 1953.) 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 1930; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas 
School of Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Anne Hughes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1943; B.S., Cornell University, 1943.) 

Vera R. Keane, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma In Nursing, 
Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1949; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, 1951.) 



* Leave of Absence 1953 



44 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Alice M. Kinch, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Assistant Department 
Head, Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Corning Hospital School of 
Nursing, Corning, N. Y., 1932; B.S., Hunter College, 1946; M.A., New York Uni- 
versity 1950.) 

Cynthia Mallory, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing. (B.A., Scarritt College, 
Nashville, Tenn., 1935; R.N., The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 

Marie J. McIntyre, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Cuper- 
visor, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Samaritan Hospital School 
of Nursing, Troy, N. Y., 1940; B.S., Syracuse University, 1950; M.S., 1952.) 

♦Audrey McCluskey, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing, Assistant Head of 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospi- 
tal School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1948.) 

Dorothy McMullan, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; Assistant 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1950.) 

Eleanor Muhs, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nursing, 
Rochester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948.) 

*Edith Nielson, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School 
of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Doris Place, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (B.S., Cornell University, 1942; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Department Head, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 

Janet R. Sawyer, B.S., R.N., Instructor, Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1946; B.S., Cornell University. 1946.) 

Doris Schwartz, R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, Comprehensive 
Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1942; B.S., New York University, 1953.) 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Administrative Assistant for 
Staff Education. (B.A., Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas, 1940; 
Diploma in Nursing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1945; 
M.Ed., Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas, 1950.) 

Charlotte Stirling, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New England Hospital for Women and 
Children, Boston, Mass., 1940; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 



* Leave of Absence 1953. 



FACULTY 45 

Mary H. Swanwick, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor in Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

Ethel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Inch, 1944; Diploma in Public 
Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 

Jeannette Walters, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Assistant Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York University, 
1944; M.A., 1949.) 

Dorothy E. White, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Delivery Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henry Ford 
Hospital School of Nursing, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, 1943; 
Midwifery Certificate, Maternity Center Association, New York City, 1951.) 

Lucille Wright, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., University of Colorado, 1950.) 

Margaret Zarnfaller, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Md., 1936; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1945; M..A 1951.) 



FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

David P. Barr, M.D. Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D. Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D. Professor of Psychiatry 

Robert F. Pitts, M.D. Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du Vigneaud, Ph.D. Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D. Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D. Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D. Professor of Pediatrics 

James M. Neill, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D. Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

R. Gordon Douglas, M.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles Berry Ph.D. Associate Professor of Anatomy 

Wilbur Hagaman, M.D. Assistant Professor in Anatomy 

David Anderson, Ph.D. Instructor in Anatomy 

Martha J. Barrett, M.A. Assistant in Physiology 

Dorothy Genghof, Ph.D. Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D. Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Frank C. Ferguson, Jr., M.D. Assistant Professor in Pharmacology 



Associated with the Faculty 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Marjorie H. Agnew, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1952.) 

Marie A. Anderson, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Garfield Memorial Hospital School 
of Nursing, Washington, D.C., 1947.) 

Mary T. Bielski, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1949.) 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing 1931.) 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor, Medical 
Nursmg Service. (B.S., Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., 1939; Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 

Laura Fawcett, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Assistant Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1936.) 

Carol C. Fripp, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1944; Diploma 
in Nursing, Meharry Medical College School of Nursing, Nashville, Tenn., 1948.) 

Anna C. Gillespie, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Assistant 
Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hospital of the Good 
Shepherd School of Nursing, Syracuse University, 1944; B.S., Syracuse University, 
1950.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., 1935.) 

Sheila Hirshberg, M.S., Assistant in Physical Education and Recreation. (B.S., B.A., 
Kent State University, Ohio, 1950; M.S., Indiana University, 1953.) 

Martha E. Jackson, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night 
Assistant Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1937.) 

Dorothy Jackson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Gynecological Nursing; Assistant Super- 
visor, Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue School of 
Nursing, 1946; B.S., Hunter College, 1953.) 

46 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 47 

Catharine Jones, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (A.B., Swath- 
more College, 1948; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1952; B.S., Cornell University, 1952.) 

Gladys Tyson Jones, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1951.) 
Ruth E. Kenny, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
| Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 
Emily J. Kroog, B.S., Assistant in Science. (B.S., New Jersey College for Women, 
1949.) 

Marie Kurihara, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1950; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1950.) 

Anne M. Lio, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Medi- 
cal Nursing Service. (R.N., Hazleton State Hospital School of Nursing, Hazleton, Pa., 
1936; B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1949; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1953.) 

Claire Meyerowitz, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., Cornell University, 1945.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Johnston Hospital 
School of Nursing, Manila, P. I., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) 

Lena J. Saffioti, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Michael's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Newark, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.S., 1952.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton 
Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School 
of Nursing, Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.S., 1952.) 
E. Jane Smith, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
A J ursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Cornell University, 1944.) 

Margaret Terry, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 
School of Nursing, Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 
Martha Van Ardsdale, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1949.) 

Jessie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1924.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursi7ig Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 
Waverly, Mass., 1933.) 



•18 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell University Medical College 

STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D. Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N. Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N. Night Administrative Assistant 

Yanda Summers, R.N. Evening Administrative Assistant 

Isabella Tremor, M.A. Administrative Assistant 

Florence J. Tritt, B.N., R.N. Day Administrative Assistant for Auxiliary Staff 

Lois Cantrell, B.Ed., R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Dorothy Knapp, R.N. Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ruth Nielsen, R.N. Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Maud David, R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lucy Hickey, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Cora Karstetter, R.N. Assistant Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N. Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Jessie Macintosh, B.S., R.N. Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

James Paterniti, R.N. Assistant Supervisor of Orderlies 



Bailey, Jane 
Buehler, Meta, B.S. 

Bitting, Amy 
Cheroniak, Tillie 
Cullington, Barbara 
Dieterle, Doris 

Bosco, Antoinette 

Cooke, Clara 

Collins, Margaret, B.S. 

Derr, Barbara 

Ellison, Dorothy, B.A. 

Farmer, Rosemary 

Husted, Salome Yauniskis 



HEAD NURSES 
MEDICINE 

Hazeltine, Louise, B.S. 

SURGERY 

Lubowska, Nina 
McKeown, Elizabeth 
Mott, Marjorie 
Pruchnik, Blanche 

OPERATING ROOM 
Johnson, Bethea 
Kirby, Patricia 
Lipinski, Helen 
McMichael, Adele 
Maclnnis, Mora 
Milone, Marion 
Mitchinson, Barbara 



Ibsen, Doris 



Schaefer, Elizabeth 
Spalding, Elizabeth, M.N. 
Tomasulo, Teresa 
Young, Eleanor 

Myers, Helen 

Ondovchik, Anna 

Rau, Rozalia Sturz, B. A. 

Sowa, Helen 

Sulette, Mary 

Vella, Mary 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Bartlett, Mary 
Bott, Alma 
Calder, Elizabeth, M. 
Colwell, Anna 
Conner, Agnes 
Douyard, Dorothy 



Hawtin, Clara 
Jackson, Dorothy, B.S. 
Jordan, Patricia 
Leonardo, Yolanda 
Lovette, Yirginia 



Mathews, Thelma 

Matus, Veronica 

Van Doren, Annamae, B.S. 

W right, Miriam 

Young, Kathleen 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 49 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Carman, Edna Stratton Evans, Alberta Nussbaumer, Elsa 

Clark, Evelyn Lambert, Lucille Pierce, Jean, B.S. 

Connolly, Kathleen, B.S. Larrow, Joyce Rouchleau, Margaret 

Curley, Irene Liddle, Evelyn Sweeney, Claire, B.S. 

Duaei, Jean Moroukian, Grace Wagner, Carolyn 

PRIVATE PATIENTS 
Clark, Mary McKeown, Ann, B.S. Rose, Lefa 

Gerchak, Helen Niebuhr, Elaine Smith, Anne 

Kozitzky, Mary Reynolds, Mary 

PEDIATRICS 
Anick, Flora Hurwitz Power, Margaret Terpak, Florence 

Myers, Joanne Purcell, Favetta Zemlock, Margaret, B.A. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 
Bracknell, Edna Janes, Carl Pitt, Marguerite 

Fry, Maredith Lundgren, Grace Poderesky, Arlene 

Goodman, Gertrude McKee, Beatrice Ulatowski, Amelia 

Harrington, Jeanne, B.S. Morrison, Esther Wilson, Cornelia 

Hollev, Joyce 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephenson,, B.S., M.S., Director 
Helen Hansted, B.S. Susan Paige, B.S. 

Meredith Jones, B.S. Virginia Pearson, B.S. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Elizabeth Richmond, B.S., M.A. 

Theresa Nodolski, B.S. Marianne W 7 eihl Rubel, B.S. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Mildred Spargo, O.T.R. Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A. Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B. Director, The Lying-in Hospital 

Melly Simon, Dipl., N. Y. School of Social Work Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

DIVISION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 
IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Consultant, Nursery School 

Eleanor Blumgart, B.A. Director, Nursery School 

Mary Agosta, B.S. Teacher, Nursery School 

Evelyn Wolfe Krause, B.S., O.T.R. Occupational Therapy 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Marian Randall, B.S., R.N. Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Service of New York 

Eleanor W. Mole, B.S. Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 

Mary E. Parker, M.S., R.N. Director, Bureau of Public Health Nursing, 

and staff New York Department of Health 

NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Director, Bank Street Nursery School 

Elizabeth Doak Director, Downtown Community Nursery School 

Mrs. Dorothy Cleverdon Teacher-Education, Summer Play Schools 



Students in the School 



Name Year Address College 

Albert, Betty Ann '53 Norwich, N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Allhusen, Helen H. '55 Verona, N. J. Elmira College 

Arabia, Rose M. '53 West Chester, Pa. Temple University 

Arnold, Joan Christman ....'53 Scotia, N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Barrus, Jean Marilyn '53 Piermont, N. Y. New York University 

Barton, Priscilla White ....'55 West Roxbury, Mass. Cornell University 

Benjamin, Beverly Elinor ....'53 Jersey City, N. J. Green Mt. Jr. College 

Bernart, Sarah Tyler '54 New Canaan, Conn. Conn. Coll. for Women 

Bernet, Mary Elizabeth '53 Johnstown, Pa. U. of Pittsburgh 

Black, Dorothy Helen '53 Wayne, Pa. Oberlin College 

Blaney, Joy '53 Weston, Mass. Mills College 

Bliss, Shirley '55 Bloomfield, N. J. Swarthmore College 

Bonsignore, Antoinette M. '55 Elmira, N. Y. Elmira College 

Bosco, Rosemarie Ann '54 Winsted, Conn. St. Joseph College 

Boylan, Evelyn '55 Brooklyn, N. Y. Packer Collegiate Inst. 

Breslin, Patricia P. '54 Richfield Springs, N. Y. Cornell University 

Brunner, Martha Louise ....'54 Plainfield, N. J. Houghton College 

Buckland, Katharine Scott '55 Minneapolis, Minn. Smith College 

Burleigh, Ruth Anne '53 Tilton, N. H. Colby College 

Cali, Cynthia Amelia '54 Jackson Heights, N. Y. St. Joseph's College 

Campbell, Margaret M. ....'54 Cortland, N. Y. Cortland State Teachers 

College 

Caner, Julia Ann '53 Baltimore, Md. Drew University 

Carmody, Irene Louise ........'55 Point Pleasant, N. J. N. J. College for Women 

Carter, Patricia M. '53 Bronx, N. Y. Hunter College 

Cavero, Carmela, N. '55 Astoria, L. I., N. Y. St. Vincent College 

Cella, Joan Marie '54 Hoboken, N. J. New York University 

Clegg, Frances Mary '55 Bellerose, L. I., N. Y. Queens College 

Charlton, Arlyn, '53 Yonkers, N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Chase, Phyllis Bradford ....'53 Brockton, Mass. Westbrook Jr. College 

Cody, Jane P. '53 Arlington, Mass. Pembroke College 

Cole, Marie Julia '54 Oberlin, Ohio Oberlin College 

Coler, Marga Simon '53 Schenectady, N. Y. Syracuse University 

Collett, Ann Marie '55 Flushing, L. I., N. Y. Hunter College 

Condello, Justine R. '55 Great Neck, L. I., N. Y. Chestnut Hill College 

Connell, Jane Marie '54 Jersey City, N. J. Rosemont College 

Cooke, Doris Louise '54 N. Plainfield, N. J. Houghton College 

Corrigan, Mary L. '54 Scituate, Mass. Colby College 

Dalby, Nancy Jane '55 Marlboro, N. Y. Cornell University 

Davison, Frances '54 Johnsburg, N. Y. Cornell University 

Deardorff, Jane E. '55 Gettysburg, Pa. Gettysburg College 

Dekker, Helen A. '54 Bedford, Ohio Denison University 

Dellen Donne, Marie T. ....'55 Brooklyn, N. Y. St. John's University 

Denisevich, Anne J. '55 Bridgeport, Conn. Carleton College 

Dervinis, Aldona B. '53 Plymouth, Pa. Wilkes College 

Dewey, Barbara K. '55 Albany, N. Y. Cornell University 

Douglas, Jane B. '55 Pelham Manor, N. Y. Colby College 

Duane, Marilyn G. '55 Asbury Park, N. J. Ohio Wesleyan University 

Duboy, Vera Swaikovsky ....'54 Atlantic Highlands, N. J.Susquehanna University 

Duncan, Elizabeth A. '53 La Grange, 111. Cornell College 

* Including those graduating in September, 1953, but not those entering at that time. 

50 



STUDENTS 



51 



Name Year Address 

Eastwick, Marjorie E. '54 N. Arlington, N. J. 

Ennis, Margaret, A. '55 Plainfield, N. J. 

Erickson, Madeleine R. '55 Dunellen, N. J. 

Figueroa, Maria Fermina....'54 Floral Park, N. Y. 

Fincke, Anne Harper '54 Manhasset, N. Y. 

Fitzgerald, Susan '55 Salamanca, N. Y. 

Ford, Mary B. '55 North Waterford, Me. 

Forman, Barbara '53 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

French, Muriel F. '54 Bronxville, N. Y. 

Freyer, Ann '53 Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y 

Funk, Elizabeth A. '55 Pennsburg, Pa. 

Gansel, Inge U. '54 Binghamton, N. Y. 

Garcia, Rose M. '53 Miami, Fla. 

Gear, Betty Lou '53 Elmira, N. Y. 

Gillette, Sally A. '54 Fairfield, Conn. 

Gleick, Mary L '54 Jermyn, Pa. 

Gold, Patrica A. '54 Oceanside, L. I., N. Y. 

Goldfuss, Eda Naomi '55 East Orange, N. J. 

Goldman, Cynthia S. '55 New York, N. Y. 

Goldsmith, Steffi R. '55 Kew Gardens, N. Y. 

Greenberg, Pearl '53 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Greus, Ruth L. '53 Maplewood, N. J. 

Grove, Jane L. *53 Pelham, N. Y. 

Grover, Margaret R. '54 Afton, N. Y. 

Hambleton, Joan Louise ....'54 Lancaster, Pa. 

Hammer, Sheila '53 West Hartford, Conn. 

Hanks, Joanne Osterheld ...'54 Palmer, Mass. 

Harro, Dorothy Vosgian ... '53 Hartford, Conn. 

Hartman, Maxine '54 New York, N. Y. 

Hartvisgsen, Lois M. '53 Scotch Plains, N. J. 

Hazard, Elaine Willis '53 Brewster, N. Y. 

Heaney, Mary C. '55 Springfield Gardens, N. Y. 

Henry, Grace-Marie '55 Chatham, N. J. 

Henderson, Grace B. '54 East Orange, N. J. 

Heston, Carolyn M. '54 Akron, Ohio 

Higgins, Ruth Whitnah ....'53 Syracuse, N. Y. 

High, Carol B '53 Reading, Pa. 

Hoehn, Lorraine M. '54 Springfield, N. J. 

Holland, Joan '53 Summit, N. J. 

Hollingshead, Mary A. '53 Longmeadow, Mass. 

Hood, Ann Kennedy '55 Medford, Mass. 

Hopkins, Janice E. '53 Williamsville, N. Y. 

Hunter, Anne E. '53 Plainfield, N. J. 

Husbands, Irma L. '55 Boston, Mass. 

Hutt, Esther F. '55 Watertown, N. Y. 

Huxster, Marilyn Ruth ....'55 Kenvil, N. J. 

Imschweiler, Patricia A. ....'54 Tremont, Pa. 

Jackson, Dorothea E. '53 Hopewell Junction, N. Y. 

Kane, Patricia M. '55 Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

Kantra, Phyllis Salvati '53 Westfield, N. J. 

Kaul, Elizabeth M. '53 Wyandotte, Mich. 

Kawaguchi, Toshiye '53 Los Angeles, Calif. 

Kerstetter, Jean C '55 Phila., Pa. 

Ketterer, Doris '55 Rye, N. Y. 

King, Mary A. '55 Greenwood, Mass. 

Knappe, Irene A. '54 Flushing, N. Y. 

Knowlton, Laura J. '55 Greenville, Me. 



College 
Obeiiin College 
N. J. College for Women 
Houghton College 
Brooklyn College 
Simmons College 
Elmira College 
St. Lawrence University 
Hofstra College 
Penn. College for Women 
.McGill University 
Penn. State College 
Cornell University 
Florida State University 
Elmira College 
Madison College 
Marywood College 
St. Lawrence University 
Hood College 
New York University 
Russell Sage College 
Brooklyn College 
Green Mt. Jr. College 
Bradford Jr. College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
U. of Connecticut 
Bates College 
Wheaton College 
Dickinson College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
St. John's University 
St. Elizabeth College 
Upsala College 
Centenary Jr. College 
Wheaton College 
Ursinus College 
Newark College 
Drew University 
Cornell University 
U. of Massachusetts 
Cornell University 
Upsala College 
New York University 
Roberts Wesleyan 
Bucknell University 
Bucknell University 
Russell Sage College 
Marymount College 
Hood College 
Hofstra College 
U. C. L. A. 
Gettysburg College 
Gettysburg College 
N. J. College for Women 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
University of Maine 



52 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Year Address 

Kobrick, Dolores A. '53 Hazelton, Pa. 

Kopp, Doris H. '55 Leonia, N. J. 

Kourakos, Kathryn '54 Bronx, N. Y. 

Lagonegro, Catherine A. ....'54 Elmira, N. Y. 

Larson, Lydia Schleicher '54 Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

Lawrence, Joanne V. '54 Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Lee, Sally Gosling '54 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Leverage, Dorothy A. '54 Easton, Md. 

Lewis, Joan C. '55 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lewis, Phyllis M. '54 Needham Heights, Mass. 

Liebenau, Irene Ada '53 New London, Conn. 

Long, Virginia Lee '55 Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Lucas, Virignia A. '54 Margate City, N. J. 

Lucker, Jean Brehmer '53 Eggertsville, N. Y. 

McCabe, Patricia M. '55 Larchmont, N. Y. 

McCully, Ellen Nora '55 Packanack Lake, N. Y. 

McLellan, Lillias Tarlton ... '54 Pelham, N. Y. 

MacGregor, Jean '54 Rochester, N. Y. 

Mansell, Ellen '55 Stoddard, N. H. 

Marshall, Mary Lou '55 Wellsville, N. Y. 

Maxson, Judith '54 Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Menzel, Joan L. '53 Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Meyer, Dorothy E. '55 Bronxville, N. Y. 

Millar, Mary Louise '54 Hamburg, N. Y. 

Mitchell, Elizabeth A. '55 Wilmington, Del. 

Mitchell, Geraldine F. '55 Manhasset, L. L, N. Y. 

Mohr, Sara Ann '54 Alburtis, Pa. 

Morrison, Peggy A '53 Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Morse, Ruth '55 Winchester, Mass. 

Mosley, Ann McCabe '53 Scranton, Pa. 

Mullin, Colleen A. '55 Binghamton, N. Y. 

Mysch, Martha Helen '55 Morristown, N. J. 

Nagengast, Rosina A. '55 Amityville, N. Y. 

Naranjo, Maria T. '53 Quinto, Ecuador 

Nash, Carol Harmon '55 Merion, Pa. 

Nash, Jean Cameron '55 Norfolk, Va. 

Nelson, Carole Ann '53 New York, N. Y. 

Noll, Carol M. '55 East Lansing, Mich. 

Olena, Ann V. '54 Hershey, Pa. 

Packer, Barbara J. '55 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Palmer, Jean L. '54 South Portland, Me. 

Peeling, Elizabeth L. '55 Roselle, N. J. 

Perrigo, Janet Medston ... '53 Augusta, Me. 

Peterson, Blanche M. '53 Cambridge, Mass. 

Peterson, Lois Gritzke '53 Buffalo, N. Y. 

Potter, Judith M '54 Providence R. I. 

Potter, Patricia A. '55 Dover, N. H. 

Purinton, Jane '55 Needham Heights, Mass 

Rahmer, Ann E. '53 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Rees, Marjorie A. '55 Nanticoke, Pa. 

Reese, Josephine '54 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Ringen, Lucille A. '55 West Orange, N. J. 

Roberts, Jane Madden '54 New York, N. Y. 

Rusk, Jane '55 Marlboro, N. Y. 

Sadenwater, Susan A. '55 Hempstead, L. I., N. Y. 

Sarr, E. Roxanna '54 East Greenbush, N. Y. 

Sawyer, Marilyn C. '54 Bedmihster, N. J. 



College 
Penn State College 
N. J. College for Women 
New York University 
Elmira College 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Finch Jr. College 
Middlebury College 
Washington College 
New York University 
Colby College 
U. of Connecticut 
Cornell University 
Ursinus College 
Elmira College 
Connecticut College 
Cornell University 
Colby College 
Cornell University 
U. of New Hampshire 
Cornell University 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Hunter College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
St. Lawrence College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Ursinus College 
Green Mt. Jr. College 
Cornell University 
Marywood College 
Harpur College 
N. J. College for Women 
Hofstra College 
University of Washington 
Duke University 
University of Kentucky 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Michigan State College 
Hershey Jr. College 
Cornell University 
University of Maine 
Gettysburg College 
Colby College 
St. Mary-of-the-Woods 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Colby Junior College 
Colby College 
Bates College 
College of New Rochelle 
Bucknell University 
Bradley University 
Cornell University 
Hunter College 
Cornell University 
Hofstra College 
Cornell University 
Drew University 



Name Year 

Schaffner, Jeanne E. '54 

Schelle, Alma M. '54 

Schick, Barbara H '53 

Schipman, Barbara M. '53 

Schmidt, Joan A. '55 

Schult, Julia M. '55 

Scott, Marilyn E. '53 

Seekamp, Lois J. '55 

Sherburne, Mariel Bither ....'54 

Showacre, Mary A. '55 

Siegle, Margaret I. '55 

Skudder, Maragret Y. '53 

Sparrell, Katherine '53 

Stanton, Beverly F. '54 

Stanton, Hannah K. '54 

Stein, Joanne '54 

Steinberg, Geraldine '54 

Steiner, Joyce J. '55 

Strickland, Jeanne A. '54 

Stutts, Ann F. '54 

Takaki, Joyce F '55 

Taranto, Mary R. '54 

Taylor, Althea '55 

Teeter, Martha A. '53 

Terriberry, Georgia '53 

Thomas, Barbara J. '53 

Thomas, Elizabeth Mutch '53 

i Topping, Sara Parsons '53 

Toshach, Susan '55 

bwne, Patricia M. '54 

refny, Jeanne C. '54 

rever, Elizabeth S. '55 

rowbridge, Judith 

Holland '53 

ully, Joan A. '54 

Van Name, Janet R. '54 

Veit, Rosemary J. '54 

Viola, Yvonne J. '54 

on der Heyde, Alice D. ...'54 

Warner, Gloria A '53 

Watkins, Marilyn J. '53 

White, Lois A. '55 

White, Marion C. '53 

Whittle, Natalie J. '55 

Wiant, Betty J. '54 

Winfield, Delia M. '55 

Wohnsiedler, Joanne '55 

Wood, Sally A. '54 

Worm, Ruth '55 

Wygant, Mary L. '55 

Zvirblis, Violet, '55 



STUDENTS 

Address 
Hershey, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Milford, N. J. 
Las Cruces, N. M. 

Lewisburg, Pa. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Queens Village, N. Y. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Cambria Heights, N. Y. 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
Waterloo, N. Y. 
Mount Carmel, Pa. 
Manhasset, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Metuchen, N. J. 
E. Greenwich, R. I. 
Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
New Canaan, Conn. 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
Morristown, N. J. 
Amagansett, N. Y. 
Saginaw, Michigan 
Kalispell, Montana 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Arlington, Va. 

Summit, N. J. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Verona, N. J. 
Calverton, L. I., N. Y. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Oyster Bay, L. I., N. Y. 
Hershey, Pa. 
Scotch Plains, N. J. 
Englewood, N. J. 
Carthage, N. Y. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Scotia, N. Y. 
Marlboro, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



53 

College 
Hershey Jr. College 
Queens College 
N. J. College for Women 
N. M. College of 

A.&M.A. 
Bucknell University 
Upsala College 
Elmira College 
Denison University 
Simmons College 
Cornell University 
Queens College 
Rosemont College 
Centenary Jr. College 
Cornell University 
University of Pittsburgh 
St. Lawrence College 
New York University 
N. J. College for Women 
Colby College 
Wooster College 
Hunter College 
Brooklyn College 
Cornell University 
Elmira College 
Colby Jr. College 
Mt. Saint Vincent 
Bryn Mawr 
Cornell University 
University of Michigan 
Mt. Holyoke College 
St. John's University 
Cornell University 

Drew University 
Rosemont College 
Cornell University 
Mt. St. Agnes College 
Hunter College 
Hood College 
Lasell Jr. College 
Russell Sage College 
Hood College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Hershey Jr. College 
Susquehanna University 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Peace College 
New York University 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 



Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

525 East 68th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information 
which will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing 
school entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or expected 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 
19 



Please send me an application blank !3asi 

(See page 13 regarding when to request and check if desired.) 



Soli 

ile 
'ire 
]in; 
h 
on; 
ton 
Hi 
de 

; lour 

: for 
; m 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"/ give the bequeath to Cornell University (or "1 give and 
bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital") the 
sum of $ for the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift to the School of Nursing shall be 
made in whole or in part for any specific purpose in the 
program of the School such use may be specified. 



Index 



Absences, 20 

Accreditation of the School, 5 

\ctivities, 21; Nurses Residence, 21, 

Alumnae Association, 23, recreation, 

21; marriage and residence, 22, 23; 

school government, 22; counseling 

services, 23 
Administrative and teaching personnel, 

38-49 
\dmission, 10; general requirements, 

10; selection of a college, 11; educa- 
tion requirements, 11; age and 

health, 12; application, 13 

dvanced standing, 15 
Urn and Philosophy of school, 5 

lumnae Association, 23, 40; Irene Sut- 

liffe Fund, 18 

natomy, 25, 29 

pplication for admission, 13 
Assistant professors, 42 

sistants in instruction, 46-47 
issociate professors, 41 
associated with the faculty, 46-49 
asic nursing program, 24; professional 

curriculum, 24 

equest, form of, 54 
iochemistry, 25, 29 
iological and physical sciences, 29 

lalendar, 3 

lareer opportunities in nursing, 4 

|linics, 9-10 

iommittee for Scholarships, 18, 40 

ontents, 2 

iornell University, 7; degree, 15; ad- 

I visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
dents, 40; Medical College faculty, 
45 

louncil of the School, 38 

.ounseling services, 23 

ourses, description of 29-37 



Curriculum, professional, 24; Unit I, 
25; Unit II, 26; Unit III, 27; Unit 
IV, 28 

Degree, 15 

Description of courses, 29-37 

Development of Behavior in Children, 
27, 36 

Diet Therapy, 25, 27, 33 

Diploma, 15 

Division of Child Development, De- 
partment of Pediatrics, 27, 49 

Educational requisites, 11 
Emeritus professors, 41 
Executive faculty, 39 
Expenses, 16 

Facilities for instruction, 8-10 

Faculty, 41-45, associated with, 46-49, 
committees of, 37 

Faculty instructors, 42-45 

Family and Community Health, 27, 30 

Fees and expenses, 16, method of pay- 
ment, 17, maintenance, 17 

Financial aid, 17-18 

Fundamentals of Nursing and allied 
courses, 25, 31; Orientation, 31 

Graduation, 14, 15; advanced standing, 
15; degree and diploma, 15 

Gynecology, care of Gynecologic (Pri- 
vate) Patients, 28, 34 

Head nurses, 48, 49 

Health service, 19-20 

History of School, 6-8 

Historical Backgrounds of Nursing, 26 

Joint Administrative Board, 38 

Lecturers, 48 
Libraries, 8 
Loan Fund, 18 



55 



56 INDEX 

Maintenance, 17 
Marriage, 22 

Medical Nursing, 26, 33, 34 
Medicine, 26, 33 
Microbiology, 25, 29 

New York Hospital, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; 
nursing supervisors, 48; head nurses, 
48, 49; staff, 48, 49 

Nurses Residence, 8, 20-21 

Nursing, Fundamentals of — and allied 
courses, 25 

Nutrition, 25; department of, 49; Nu- 
trition and Diet Therapy, 32, 33 

Obstetric Nursing, 26, 35 
Officers of administration, 39 
Operating Room Nursing, 26, 35 
Orientation, 25, 31 
Out-Patient Department, 10, 26 
Out-Patient Nursing, 26, 31 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9, 49 

Pediatric Nursing; 27, 36; pediatrics, 
27, 36 

Pharmacology I, 25, 32; Pharmacology 
II, 25, 32 

Physical Education, 25, 26, 27, 29 

Physiology, 25, 29 

Private Patient Nursing, 28, 34 

Professional Problems I, 25, 30 

Professional Problems II, 28, 30 

Professors, 41 

Program, basic nursing, 24 

Promotion and graduation, 14-15; Ad- 
vanced standing, Degree, Diploma, 
15 



Psychiatric Nursing, 27, 36, 37; psychia- 
try, 27, 36 
Public health affiliations, 10, 27, 49 
Public Health Nursing, 10, 27, 30 

Recreational facilities, 21 
Registration, State, 5 
Residence and marriage, 22 

Scholarships, 18-19 

School government, 22 

School of Nursing, administrative of- 
ficers, 39, faculty committees, 39 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing, 
25, 30 

Social Sciences, 29 

Social Service Departments, 10, 49 

State registration, 5 

Student life and activities, 21-23 

Students now in School, 50-53 

Supervisors, nursing 48 

Surgical Nursing, 26, 34; Surgery, 26, 
34 



Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 16 

Uniforms, 16; see also Maintenance 
Urological Nursing, 27, 34 

Vacations, 20 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 

10, 25, 49 
Ward Activities and Relationships, 28 

32 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

JULY 29, 1954 

Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1954-55 SESSIONS 



Term Dates 1954-55 

Sept. 27, 1954 -Dec. 19, 1954 
Dec. 20, 1954 -March 13, 1955 
March 14, 1955 -June 5, 1955 
June 6, 1955 -Sept. 25, 1955 
Sept. 26, 1955 -Dec. 18, 1955 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of 
New York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from 
York Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is in the Nurses Residence at the corner of 
York Avenue and 70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus, M-7, east-bound, runs to York 
Avenue and 70th Street. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 46. Number 3. July 29, 1954. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1954-1955 

1320 YORK AVENUE, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Contents 



Calendar 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim and Philosophy of the School 5 

Accreditation 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History 6 

Facilities for Instruction 8 

Admission 10 

Promotion and Graduation 14 

Fees and Expenses 16 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 18 

Health Service 20 

Vacations and Absences 20 

Student Life and Activities 21 

Basic Nursing Program 24 

Description of Courses 29 

Administration 37 

Faculty 40 

Associated with the Faculty 45 

Students in the School 49 

Form of Bequest 53 

Index 55 

Picture Credits: 
Percy W. Brooks, Anthony Lanza, Paul Parker 



Calendar 



Sept. 


23 Thursday 


Sept. 


25 Saturday 


Oct. 


12 Tuesday 


Nov 


25 Thursday 


Dec. 


24 Friday 


Dec. 


25 Saturday 


Jan. 


1 Saturday 


Jan. 


2 Sunday 


Feb. 


12 Saturday 


Feb. 


22 Tuesday 


May 


30 Monday 


J^y 


4 Monday 


Sept. 


5 Monday 


Oct. 


12 Wednesday 


Nov. 


24 Thursday 


Dec. 


24 Saturday 


Dec. 


26 Monday 


fan. 


2 Monday 


fan. 


3 Tuesday 


Feb. 


13 Monday 


Feb. 


22 Wednesday 


Vfay 


30 Ty^^??^drty 


fuly 


4 fflWft^dflv 



1954 

Commencement 

Registration of Freshmen students 

Holiday: Columbus Day 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1955 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last Day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 

Holiday: Washington's Birthday 

Holiday: Memorial Day 

Holiday: Independence Day 

Holiday: Labor Day 

Holiday: Columbus Day 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1956 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last Day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 

Holiday: Washington's Birthday 

Holiday: Memorial Day 

Holiday: Independence Day 



Career Opportunities in Nursing 

Professional Nursing is continually growing and expanding in its 
efforts to bring better service to more people. The broadening concept 
of health care with its emphasis on the maintenance of health, the 
prevention of illness and the rehabilitation of the handicapped, has 
brought with it, not only the need for more nurses but for better 
qualified practitioners. More and more nursing service is reaching 
people outside the walls of the hospital — in homes, factories, schools, 
offices, clinics — and the recipients of these services include people in 
all stages of health and in all age groups. 

The scope of activity of the modern nurse also increases as the 
boundaries of knowledge are pushed back in the field of health. To 
qualify for professional practice today requires a great deal more than 
a knowledge of techniques, for the nurse is constantly called upon to 
exercise judgement based on expert knowledge and understanding, 
to identify nursing problems and to decide upon courses of nursing 
action. Her education must provide her with a solid foundation not 
only in the social and biological sciences, but also in the humanities. 

Physical and mental illness is often caused by conditions in the 
home, on the job or in the community. Therefore, personal relation- 
ships, the role of the family, understanding of the growth and develop- 
ment of children and community organization for meeting health v 
needs, are some of the things which must be included in her ; D 
preparation. 

The nurse needs to be a teacher as well as a practitioner of nursing 
and her instructions encompass not only her patients and their r 
families, but non-professional co-workers, such as the practical nurse i 
and nurses' aid. To the extent that she can give leadership in this kind 
of team relationship, nursing care is substantially increased in both 
quantity and quality. 

Those young women who are interested in preparing to teach in 
schools of nursing or to become administrators, — two fields in which 
the positions are varied and interesting — will find that they are able ( 
to do so with little difficulty or loss of time, if the preparation which V 
they have had in their basic professional program has been broad ( 
and sound. 



The Aim and Philosophy of the School 

It is the aim of the School to help prepare qualified practitioners of 
nursing for beginning positions in hospitals, public health agencies, 
and her instructions encompass not only her patients and their 
needed, and to help the student understand her future role in a 
profession which accepts an ever-increasing responsibility to society. 

It is recognized that the development of the student into a well- 
integrated and responsible individual is necessary for the realization 
of this aim, and it is the belief of the School that preparation of this 
nature can best be accomplished when the student has the opportunity 
to develop a general and educational maturity which will enable her 
to function with the widest possible perspective. With a focus thus 
broadened she is potentially a more versatile, adaptable and under- 
standing practitioner. 



Accreditation 



The School is accredited by the Accrediting Service of the National 
League for Nursing as one of a small number of collegiate schools 
which prepares students for professional practice in public health 
nursing as well as for practice in hospitals and in other fields of 
nursing. The School is a member of the Department of Baccalaureate 
and Higher Degree Programs of the National League for Nursing and 
jmeets the requirements of the New York State Department of 
lEducation. 



State Registration for Graduates 



" lt ) Graduates who are citizens are eligible for admission to the examina- 
ion for licensure administered by the Regents of the State of New 

; jYork and are expected to take the first examination given after comple- 
tion of the nursing course. Satisfactory completion of this examination 
lassifies the graduate of the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in 
he State of New York. Having become registered in New York State, 
t is possible to apply for registration without examination in other 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

states. In New York State, if citizenship is not completed within seven 
years from the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

The New York State Nurse Practice Act states that a nurse must be 
licensed by examination in the state in which she was graduated. For 
this reason, graduates of this School are urged to take State Board ex- 
aminations in New York State rather than in another state as the) 
may wish to practice in New York State at a future date. 



History 



One of the first such schools to be founded in the United States, this 
School of Nursing celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary in 1952. A; 
early as 1799, Dr. Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physi- 
cian, organized at The New York Hospital a series of lectures foi 
nurses combined with a course of practical instruction in the wards. 
Although the theoretical content was meager and the practical instruc- 
tion not systematically planned, these classes focussed attention on the 
fact that women who had some preparation for their work gave better 
care to patients than those without instruction. Each year the program 
was amplified and in 1877 a formal training school for nurses was 
established "to consist of one teacher and 24 pupils." 

GROWTH OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

The New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in America, has 
been throughout its 183-year history, a voluntary, non-profit, genera] 
hospital, maintained by contributions and endowments. Granted a 
Royal Charter in 1771, during the reign of George III, the Hospital's 
first patients were American soldiers wounded in the Revolutionary 
War. Starting its service to the nation by thus serving in the conflict tc 
establish the Republic, the Hospital has made outstanding contribu- 
tions in every war of our country's history. 



From those first Colonial years, The New York Hospital has pio- 
neered in the field of medicine and of community service. Among 
the Hospital's earliest progressive steps was its recognition of the fact 
that the mentally ill were sick persons needing medical care, rather 
than outcasts fit only for prison or the almshouse. The Hospital intro- 
duced vaccination for small pox for the first time in America, and also-L 
the use of the temperature chart — now standard practice in all hos- 
pitals. Carrying on in this tradition, the Hospital has taken leadership 



HISTORY OF SCHOOL 7 

in many important new programs including studies in psychosomatic 
medicine and the establishment of an ambulatory transfusion clinic for 
the treatment of serious blood conditions. 

In a four-fold program of community service. The New York Hos- 
pital has provided care of the sick — regardless of ability to pay; 
teaching — providing clinical instruction for medical students as early 
as 1791, lectures and practical instruction for nurses starting in 1799; 
research and preventive medicine. 

As a result of these services, as well as the growth of the city and 
the increasing scope of knowledge related to health, expansion and 
relocation have been necessary; from its original site on Broadway and 
Pearl Streets, the Hospital moved up to West 16th Street in 1877 and 
then in 1932, having entered into formal affiliation with Cornell 
j University, moved uptown to the present site to occupy, with the 
Medical College the present group of buildings known as The New 
York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. 



SCHOOL BECOMES PART OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



The health needs of the community have always been the driving 

force behind the program and organization of the School of Nursing 

which has grown and expanded to keep pace with those needs. The 

first course was eighteen months long, and after thirteen years this was 

increased to twenty-four months, and in 1896 to three years. Thus, it 

was in keeping with this tradition of progress that in 1942, on the 65th 

anniversary of its founding, the School of Nursing became a part of 

liiCornell University, making available the resources of the two great 

era institutions, each with a long history and notable record of achieve- 

i < iment in the fields of education and public service. 



J Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
~ overnment's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
ander the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading ob- 
ject shall be ... to teach such branches of learning as are related to ag- 
iculture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a re- 
markable system of higher education. However, it received its greatest 
mpetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under 
he influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first 
^resident, determined the form of the new University. In 1864, an 
greement was reached with the legislature of New York State which 
esulted in the founding of "a University of a new type ... an insti- 
lution where any person can find instruction in any study." This com- 
rihi )ination of federal, state and private interests and resources is unique, 



fa 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

It gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policie 
of -the University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals 

One field of service after another has found preparation for it: 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an associatioi 
between the Cornell University Medical College and The New Yorl 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the tw< 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructec 
buildings of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the 
East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for nursing wa 
first brought under the auspices of the University in July, 1942, when 
by agreement between the Trustees of the University and the Gover 
nors of The New York Hospital, the School of Nursing, long con 
ducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made a schoo 
within the University. 



Facilities for Instruction 

Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in th 
Nursing School. These include class and conference rooms, libraries 
laboratories and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching 
unit on the second floor of the Nurses Residence while others are pre 
vided in the Hospital and in the Cornell University Medical College 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all th< 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various agencies o 
the city and the surrounding community. 

LIBRARIES 

The library of the School contains a wide selection of materials oi 
nursing and related fields, including complete sets of importan 
medical and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. It is under th 
direction of a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library o 
the Medical College are readily accessible and supplement those of th 
Nursing School in such a way as to make available unusual resources t< 
both the students and faculty of the School. A professionally prepare) 
librarian is in charge in both libraries. Additional small libraries ar 
adjacent to the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors in al 
departments. Through the New York Public Library, The Nationa 
Health Library and others, valuable supplementary materials ar 
placed at the disposal of instructors and students as needed. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 
WIDE EXPERIENCE IX CLINICAL SERVICES 



The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are superior for 
the care and study of patients. The Hospital is comprised of five clini- 
cal departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided not 
only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both in- 
patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for 
the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized clinical 
services are therefore available which are seldom found within a single 
organization. The Hospital has a capacity of 1,200 beds and 
during the past year 28,324 patients were hospitalized and 45,152 
were admitted as out-patients. The conduct of research in all clinical 
departments gives the student nurse an opportunity to become 
)0 1 increasingly aware of the part which the nurse must be prepared to 
play in research projects. Authenticity of the findings in such studies 
depends in no small degree on the accuracy with which the nurse 
carries out tests and procedures, observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the special- 
ties of tuberculosis, medical neurology and metabolism, urology, ear, 
nose and throat disorders, orthopedic, plastic and neuro-surgery, and 
opthalmology. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity of 206 adults and 
102 newborns and provides for obstetric and gynecologic patients. 
Each year more than 4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. 



The Department of Pediatrics includes 95 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children and the services 
of an occupational therapist offers opportunities for the nursing student 
to study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick 
children. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the 
student works with and observes the development of the normal child, 
and is thus better able to evaluate deviations from the normal which 
may accompany illness. 









The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity 
of 108 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational 
and recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of the 
mentally ill. The close connection between the psychiatric, medical 
and nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a 
consultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the 
relationship between mental and physical illness throughout her ex- 
perience in the Hospital. 



10 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

OUT-PATIENT SERVICES 

The Out-Patient Department provides opportunity for the study 
of a large number of patients who come for general health 
supervision, diagnosis of disease and for treatment of disease that can 
be conducted on an ambulatory basis. Each year more than 250,000 
patient visits are made to this Department. 

Students assist in diagnostic tests, in treatments and in teaching 
patients so that care without hospitalization can be effective. Arrange- 
ments for continuity of care through use of referrals to public health 
nursing agencies are an essential part of clinic experience. Opportunity 
is provided for participation in the guidance of expectant mothers 
through mother's classes and individual conferences and for study of 
the family approach to health maintenance and care of children. 

FIELD INSTRUCTION IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

Experience is provided in family health counseling, bedside nursing, 
and in the appropriate use of community agencies through cooperation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Visiting Nurse 
Association of Brooklyn. These agencies provide generalized family 
health services for patients in their homes. 

Additional experience in public health nursing in an official agency 
is available to a limited number of students through arrangements 
with the New York State Department of Health. Students with good 
scholastic records and a definite interest in public health nursing as a 
career are given preference among those who request this experience. 

Members of the staff of the New York City Department of Health 
plan with the faculty of the School for appropriate ways to contribute 
to the student program. The Kips Bay Yorkville Health Center serves 
the district in which the School of Nursing is located. It affords students 
an opportunity to observe the relationship between the New York 
City Department of Health and The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center. 



Admission 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF REQUIREMENTS 

Nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who have a 
deep interest in public service. Candidates are selected whose creden- \ 
tials indicate high rank in health, scholarship, maturity, ability to work 



ADMISSION 11 

with people, and who give evidence of personal fitness for nursing. A 
minimum of two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive of 
Physical Education) is required for admission. 

SELECTION OF A COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARS 

To meet the requirement of two years of college for admission, a 
very wide choice of colleges is available as the content of these two 
years is general liberal arts and may be taken in any university, college, 
or junior college accredited by one of the regional associations of 
colleges and secondary schools. Applicants may therefore take the first 
two years at any one of a great many colleges throughout the country 
or in one of the colleges of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. 
The work of the first two years required for admission to this school 
contains no nursing or "pre-nursing" courses and, therefore, selection 
of a college in which to take the first two years is NOT dependent 
upon its offering a pre-nursing program. 

Help in the selection of a college may be obtained by referring to 
the list of STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL which appears at the back 
of our School of Nursing bulletin as this list indicates the colleges from 
which students now in the School of Nursing have transferred. The 
list is, however, not a complete list of the colleges from which students 
may transfer. 

In selecting a college and registering for the courses of your first two 
years, read carefully the section below on Educational Requirements 
for Admission. 

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Within the two-year liberal arts program of the first two college 
years required for admission, only 15 credits are in specified subjects 
as follows: 

Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Other subjects which make up a desirable preparation for admission 
to the School of Nursing but in which there is no specified requirement 
are: 

English, Literature, Sociology, Human Relations, History 

After planning for the above subjects, other subjects next in im- 
portance depending upon the special interest and abilities of the 
student and the courses available are: 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Languages (may be of particular usefulness with patients and also 
for the many opportunities in international work and in 
advanced study) 

Anthropology, Economics, Physics 

Art, Music 

Additional courses in physical or biological sciences (for students 
taking more than 60 credits) 

However not more than 12 hours of biological science can be 
accepted toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for 
admission. 

The program in the School of Nursing requires the student to have 
a good background in English composition, communications skills, and 
use of the library. Courses which are not accepted as fulfilling the 
6-hour credit requirements in biological sciences are human anatomy, 
physiology, and bacteriology, as these courses are included in the 
professional program after admission to the School of Nursing. In 
general the principle applies that those courses given within the School 
of Nursing cannot be credited towards meeting admissions require- 
ments because there is no allowance within the School of Nursing 
program for electives which can be substituted for courses already 
taken. 

Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca should confer 
early with their advisors in the college in which they are registered or 
with the Office of the Dean of Women. Advisors will be glad to assist 
in planning a desirable program. These students as well as students in 
colleges other than Cornell should, however, communicate with the 
School of Nursing as indicated under Application for Admission. 
Each time you register for your courses during your first two 
years, it is suggested that you take this bulletin with you and review 
this section with your advisor. Applicants who do not meet in full the 
specific subject requirements for admission, but who have a good 
record of two or more years of college are encouraged to communicate 
with the School of Nursing for review of their credits and possible 
assistance in arranging for courses which can be taken in summer 
sessions. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifica- 
tions, there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is ex- 
pected that applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. 
The results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a 
dental examination must be submitted at the time of application. 



ADMISSIOiN 13 

Inoculation against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox 
will be required of all students before admission to the School. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the 
form at the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York 
21, N. Y. Applicants for admission in 1956 should include with their 
application an application fee of $5.00. As one measure of suitability 
for nursing, certain psychometric tests are required before admission. 
The applicant is asked to meet the charge of 55.00 for these tests. 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the appli- 
cation procedure. Effort is made to have the applicant meet with a 
member of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. 
If this is not practicable, a conference can often be arranged with an 
alumna or other qualified person living in the vicinity of the 
applicant's home or college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible edu- 
cational background preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal applica- 
tion should be made during the first term of the first college year 
if the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college year. 
When all application forms are received, including the report of the 
psychometric test and a transcript covering the first year of college 
; work, and these appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted 
c pending satisfactory fulfillment of all remaining requirements. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon 
notification of this provisional acceptance to the School. This assures 
that a place will be held for her in the entering class, pending satis- 
factory completion of all admission prerequisites. The full amount 
is credited toward the graduation fee. The deposit is not refundable 
if the applicant does not register. 



Promotion and Graduation 

Each term is 12 weeks in length and the established system of 
grading is a scale of F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. An 
average of C for each term is required for promotion without condi- 
tion. A grade of C is required in the courses Fundamentals of Nursing 
and Pharmacology I. A grade below C in any clinical field of nursing 
practice or a term average which is less than C places a student on 
condition. This must be removed by the end of the next term to insure 
further promotion. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the 
judgment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she 
can complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable period of 
time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the School unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, 
in which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the 
instructor, if the course is available. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the 
student to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory 
to it. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a 
Promotion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice 
and her relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into ac- 
count. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her 
work or who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the 
qualifications which are important for a good nurse may be put on 
condition or asked to withdraw from the School. The School reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of 
the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for nursing. 

Parents or guardians of students under twenty-one years of age are 
advised when students are placed on condition or asked to leave the 
School. However, in general, the School reports only to students. Each 
student is kept informed of her progress through frequent examinations, 

14 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 15 

reports and conferences, and every effort is made to provide assistance 
and guidance which will help her to succeed. When it seems advisable 
a student may be asked to withdraw from the program without having 
been on condition. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The Society of 
the New York Hospital. In order to qualify for the degree and diploma, 
the student must maintain a cumulative average of C for the three- 
year program, and must have completed satisfactorily all of the theory 
and practice outlined in this catalogue. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student ^\ho has received her baccalaureate degree before admis- 
sion may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience. An 
exemption may be granted up to a maximum of 12 weeks. An average 
of B in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for 
favorable consideration. Exemption must be requested at the begin- 
ning of the last term of the second year. 



Fees and Expenses 

(Subject to variation or change) 



On Approx. Approx. Approx. 
Admission March 15 March 15 March 15 
TUITION AND FEES (6 months) (12 mo) (12 mo.) (6 mo.) Total 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 140.00 $140.00 $130.00 $ 40.00 450.00 

Public Health Field Expense 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 1.50 3.00 3.00 1.50 9.00 

Health Service 6.00 12.00 12.00 6.00 36.00 

Hospitalization Insurance* .... 4.80 9.60 9.60 4.80 28.80 

Dental Service 4.00 4.00 '4.00 12.00 

Nursery School 5.00 5.00 

Graduation 25.00 t 25.00 

$196.30 $168.60 $223.60 $ 77.30 $665.80 
UNIFORMS** 

Aprons & Accessories $ 40.52 $ 40.52 

Sweaters . 5.25 5.25 

Shoes 12.75 $ 12.75 25.50 

Scissors & Name Pin 3.37 3.37 

Rental Laboratory Coat 1.00 1.00 

Rental Public Health Uniforms $ 5.00 5.00 

Graduation Uniform & Cap 9.25 9.25 

$ 62.89 $ 12.75 $ 14.25 $ 89.89 

OTHER REQUIRED EXPENSES: Expenses in the first column, with exception of 
field trips, are paid on admission, but in later terms occur throughout the term 
rather than in one payment. 

Books & Manuals $ 45.00 $ 15.00 $ 10.00 $ 5.00 $ 75.00 

Gymnasium Suit 8.75 8.75 

Field Trips 3.00 3.00 30.00 4.00 40.00 

Student Activities & 

Handbook 6.25 5.25 5.25 16.75 

Meals during first 24 weeks... x x 

$ 63.00 $ 23.25 $ 45.25 $ 9.00 $140.50 
TOTAL FEES AND 
EXPENSESxx $322.19x $204.60 $283.10 $ 86.30 $896.19x 

SPECIAL FEES: For change of schedule, classes, or clinical assignment, reinstatement 
following leave of absence — $10; special arrangement for examination — $2; 
specially scheduled clinical conferences — fee as for tutoring. For reasons judged 
adequate in exceptional circumstances a special fee may be waived by the Dean. 

* Hospitalization insurance is Associated Hospital Service — Blue Cross. See following page for 

further information. 
* * Expenses for uniforms are those other than the blue plaid uniform dresses and cap supplied by 

the School. The cape is not listed because optional ( $21.75 ) . 
x Meals during first 24 weeks are paid for by the student as purchased, approx. $13.00 a week. 

After this period meals are furnished, 
f The deposit of $25 paid at time of acceptance is credited as graduation fee and is deducted from 

final payment, not refundable if student withdraws before admission or does not complete program, 
xx Those few seniors granted additional elective of 8 weeks planned thru N.Y. State Department of 

Health meet additional expense of approximately $260, (State stipends sometimes available.) 

16 



FEES AND EXPENSES 17 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon tentative acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is 
required. This is credited as the graduation fee but is not refund- 
able if the student withdraws her application or does not finish. On 
admission, payment is due on registration day for tuition and fees 
for the first six months, for the uniforms and certain other expenses 
listed. A statement of fees payable on that day will be sent to each 
accepted applicant shortly before registration day. 

The second payment of fees and tuition is due on approximately 
March 15 following admission and covers a 12 months period; the 
third payment is due the following March 15 for a 12 months period; 
the last payment is due on approximately March 15 prior to the fall 
graduation for the last 6 months period. Students are billed in advance. 
Fees become due on the first day of the March term and must be paid 
not later than twenty days after the first day of the term. 

The School reserves the right to change its tuition and fees in 
amount, time, and manner of payment at any time without notice. 

Articles listed under UNIFORMS and under OTHER EXPENSES 
are purchased thru the School and obtained after admission in accord 
with instructions given to each student after admission. A list of neces- 
sary personal equipment will be sent to each accepted applicant shortly 
before registration day. 

Students holding hospitalization insurance at the time of admission 
are required to take out insurance thru the School as required for all 
students. Students pay one half of the cost and the other half is paid 
by the Hospital. Refunds for policies held on admission may be 
claimed at the office of former policy. 

MAINTENANCE AND UNIFORM 

With the exceptions indicated below, each student receives main- 
tenance consisting of room, an allowance for meals, and a reasonable 
amount of laundry. During the first 24 weeks in the School the stu- 
dent meets the cost of her meals which are paid for as purchased, 
totalling approximately $13.00 a week. During vacations and when in 
the elective experience with the New York State Department of Health 
the student meets the entire cost of her maintenance. The uniform 
dresses and caps are provided for each student. These remain the 
property of the School and are returned on graduation or withdrawal. 
For the public health assignment, students are required to provide 
themselves with navy or dark tailored coats and hats appropriate to 
the season. Other items of uniform are listed under expenses. 



Scholarships' and Financial Aid 



FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Committee for Scholarships of the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, a women's committee interested in 
the School, makes available a fund from which scholarships are 
awarded each year, usually in amounts of $100 to $400, to students in 
need of financial assistance. These are open to both entering students 
and students already in the School. Factors in addition to financial 
need which are taken into consideration are the student's all-round 
record as indicated by academic work, participation in school and 
community activities, and qualities indicating promise of growth and 
a contribution to nursing. 

Application is made to the Dean. For entering students, application 
is made at the time of application for admission to the School, and 
grants are made on recommendation of the Admissions Committee. 
Awards are regarded as final only after the student has enrolled. Stu- 
dents already in the School should make application not later than 
February 1st for grants to be used in the period March 15 to March 15. 

JULIETTE E. BLOHME SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

This student scholarship established in 1953 by Dr. and Mrs. George 
H. Van Emburgh as a memorial to Juliette E. Blohme of the class of 
1922 through a gift of $6,000, the interest on which may be used in 
whole or in part each year. The scholarship is approximately $200. 

EMMA JEAN STEEL FULLER FUND 

This Fund, begun in 1952 by the Class of 1952 in memory of Emma 
Jean Steel Fuller, a former member of the class, is available for an 
occasional scholarship. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

Loans are available through this fund after the first term in the 
School for students who are in need of financial aid. Applications are 
made to the Dean and are accepted at any time. However, students 
are encouraged to plan as far as possible in the Spring for the follow- 
ing school year and to place applications by May 15. 

18 



SCHOLARSHIP AND FINANCIAL AID 19 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the School 
and in honor of Irene Sutliffe '80, Director of the School, 1886 to 
1902, scholarship grants are available to graduates of the School for 
post-graduate study. They are granted primarily to alumnae who are 
qualifying for positions connected with the School of Nursing. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION — For additional information on 
scholarships and grants-in-aid available to students taking their first 
two years of academic work at Cornell in Ithaca, write to Scholarship 
Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

The following three scholarships for residents of New York State, 
making application while in high school, are available for the first 
two college years as well as for the School of Nursing. 

STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and acad- 
emies. Annual award $350 for each of four years while in attendance 
in any approved college in the State. This scholarship may therefore 
be used for the first two years of college required for admission to the 
School of Nursing, and continues for the first two years in the School 
of Nursing. Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local 
high school principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE WAR ORPHANS SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents 
of New York State who are graduates of its common schools and 
academies and who are children of deceased or disabled veterans of 
World War I. Annual award $350 towards tuition plus $100 for main- 
tenance for each of four years while in attendance in any approved 
college in the State. This scholarship may therefore be used for the 
first two years of college required for admission to the School of 
Nursing and continues for the first two years in the School of Nursing. 
Awarded on the basis of Regents examinations under regulations of 
the State Education Department. Apply to local high school principal, 
or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE CORNELL SCHOLARSHIPS — Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and acad- 
emies. Annual award $200 reduction in tuition for each of four 
years. This scholarship may be used by students who take the first 
two years of their academic work at Cornell in Ithaca and for the 
first two years in the School of Nursing. Awarded after a competitive 
examination. Apply to local high school principal, or to Commissioner 
of Education, Albany, N. Y. 



Health Service 



Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available to them a well-organized health service which is maintained 
under the general direction of a committee of the faculty and a school 
physician. Provision is also made for infirmary and hospital care. 

Upon admission to the School a physical examination by the school 
physician and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray 
is required every six months, and a physical examination during each 
school year. A Shick test is performed on all students after admission 
to the School; immunization to diphtheria is administered to those 
reacting positively. The Mantoux test is given during the pre-clinical 
period and, for those who are negative, is repeated at regular intervals. 

Students receive dental health service consisting of a full mouth series 
of X-rays, examination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with sugges- 
tions for treatment, and follow-up supervision. For repair of dental 
defects, students are referred to their own dentists. 

An infirmary is maintained in the Residence. Infirmary care is 
provided for short-term minor illness. For more serious illness, students 
are taken care of in The New York Hospital within the limits of the 
Hospital's policy on admissions and bed usage, and hospitalization up 
to the amount of eight weeks for any one admission is provided. 
Elective surgery is not included and if not taken care of before admis- 
sion to the School must be arranged during vacations. Expenses for 
private nurses, transfusions and personal items are borne by the 
student. The School reserves the right to collect all hospitalization 
benefits available through third parties for any period of care coming 
within the provisions of these benefits. 

The fees for health service, dental service and hospitalization insur- 
ance are listed under school fees in this bulletin. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a stu- 
dent's health makes it unwise for her to remain in the School, she may 
be required to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any 
time. 

Vacations and Absences 

A vacation of four weeks is given each year in the first and second 
year, and 23 days in the third year. Students entering with a bac- 
calaureate degree, who have an exemption of time, may have a slightly 

20 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 21 

shorter vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged to con- 
form to the requirements of the program but usually fall within the 
Summer months. 

Because of the nature of assignments, a leave of absence usually 
necessitates absence for an entire term. As result of absence, a student 
may be required to re-register for a course of study or a nursing practice 
period, or she may be transferred to a later class. 



Student Life and Activities 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence adjacent to the Hospital. 
Every effort has been made in the construction and equipment of the 
Residence to provide for the normal and healthy life of students and 
staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively fur- 
nished single rooms with running water. Each floor has ample baths, 
showers, and toilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room 
with adjoining kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

A large auditorium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun 
roofs, television sets and a hobby room are also available. There are 
pianos for student use. Student activities planned jointly with the 
Cornell University Medical College are a regular part of the recreation 
and include glee club and dramatic productions. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach 
equipment and an outdoor grill are available. 






22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities, a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of representatives of those living in the Residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for 
friends and relatives at a nominal charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless 
in music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Com- 
mittee, students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities 
as membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum 
of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The 
Blue Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships, the 
Christian Nurses' Fellowship and the Newman Club. Guest speakers 
and planned forums provide an opportunity for exchange of thought 
on many subjects. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule 
which is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all stu- 
dents. The Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, 
Judicial Council and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on 
Student Affairs acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organiza- 
tion and, with the Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty 
meetings which provide for informal discussions of school activities 
and problems. 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one 
or more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater 
problem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 23 

of study, freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature 
is important. For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a 
student who is contemplating marriage during her period in the School 
to discuss her proposed plans well in advance with the Dean and to 
obtain permission to remain in the School. 

Under certain conditions permission to live outside the Residence 
may be granted to a married student provided in the judgment of the 
School this will not interfere with the student's School responsibilities. 
The faculty record their belief that responsibility for maintaining the 
quality of her work and for continuing participation in School activi- 
ties must be accepted by the student. A married applicant is accepted 
if in the judgment of the Admissions Committee she meets these re- 
quirements and lives in the Residence for at least the first six months. 

Students anticipating marriage are expected to make plans which 
will fit into their regular vacation or school schedule as leave of absence 
can rarely be granted except for an entire term. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The School maintains active counseling services which are available 
to any student who needs assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in her normal work in the School or in con- 
nection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that 
those students who need help on questions of educational program, 
finances, health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to 
those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for 
any student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase 
of her life while in the School of Nursing. 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
iae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 

[ospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
:en alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national 
>rofessional organization of nurses, now known as the American 

[urses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part 
)f the Cornell University Alumni Association. 



The Basic Nursing Program 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 11 and 12. 

Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry — (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects 45 

Total (Pre-Professional) 60 

PROFESSIONAL (3 years). In the School of Nursing. 

Semester Hours Credit 

Units: I II III IV 

Orientation (No credit) 

Physical Education (No credit) 

Biological Science 7 

Biochemical Science 3 

Social Science 5 2 1.5 2 

Nutrition 1.5 1.5 

Pharmacology 2.5 

Fundamentals of Nursing 9 2 

Clinical Nursing 31 24 8 

Total (Professional) 28 33 29 10 100 

Grand Total (Required for B.S. in Nursing) 160 



THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of three calendar years. 
In each clinical service, related classes, conferences, and bedside instruc- 
tions are given concurrently with practice and emphasis is placed on 
disease prevention, health instruction and rehabilitation. The student 
receives selected experiences in evening and night duty. An introduc- 
tion to community nursing is provided through conferences and 



24 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 25 

observation in various agencies assisting with health problems. The 
student participates in discussions centering around family health 
and assists in the referral of patients requiring nursing care after 
hospital discharge. An eight-week period of supervised practice in 
family health service is provided through affiliation with the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum 
as the need arises. The professional programs, divided into four units 
of theory and experience, follows. 



UNIT I 

This unit consists of 24 weeks which are devoted primarily to class 
and laboratory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice 
in the pavilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at 
Christmas time. Following are the courses presented: 

Course 

Course Title No. 

Orientation 120 

Fundamentals of Nursing 121 

Pharmacology I 122 

Pharmacology II 123 

Anatomy 100 

Physiology 101 

Biochemistry 102 

Microbiology 103 

Introduction To Clinical Nursing 124 

Psychological Principles in Nursing Practice 110 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing Ill 

Professional Problems I 113 

Nutrition 130 

Diet Therapy and Cooking 131 

Physical Education 10 

Total 790 28 



Class 


Wks. 


Semester 


Hours 


Prac 


tice Mrs. Credit 


15 









325 






7 


15 






0.5 


30 






2 


60 






2.5 


45 






2.5 


60 






3 


45 






2 


30 






2 


30 






2 


30 






2 


15 






1 


12 






0.5 


36 






1 


42 










26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

UNIT II 

During Unit II, which is 52 weeks in length, the student is assigned 
to five clinical areas for theory and practice. These include the Out- 
Patient Department, the Operating and Recovery Rooms, Medicine, 
Surgery and Obstetrics. A vacation of three weeks is given in the 
summer. 

In the Out-Patient Department the student has an opportunity to 
learn something of the medical and nursing needs of patients who are, 
for the most part, carrying on their usual life activities, while being 
treated for some health problem, or learning to live with some physical 
limitation. She is assigned to the clinics of medicine, surgery and 
pediatrics. During her in-patient experience on the medical and sur- 
gical services, she has experience not only on the "general" services 
but in such specialties as ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology 
and neuro-surgery. 

It is not anticipated that the student will develop a high degree of 
technical skill in the operating room. However, through supervised 
practice and observations at the field of operation, and by participating 
in the care of patients in the Recovery Room, the ground work is laid 
for understanding of the nurse's responsibilities to the patient, not only 
during the operation, but immediately preceding and following it. 

In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for practice include activities 
related to the newer concepts of maternal and newborn care, which 
are embodied in such terms as "preparation for labor" and "rooming- 
in." The student has experience in the Out-Patient Department, de- 
livery floor, nursery and post-partum units. 

The program for this Unit is as follows: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Principles of Medical Nursing 140 68 4.5 

Practice of Medical Nursing 141 12 3 

Core Course in Operating Room, 

Surgical and Out-Patient Nurs. 150 66 4.5 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 151 24 1.5 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 152 12 3 

Principles of Maternity Nursing 160 78 5 

Practice of Maternity Nursing 161 12 3 

Principles of Nurs. in the Out-Patient Dept. 118 20 1.5 

Practice of Nurs. in the Out-Patient Dept. 119 6 1.5 

Principles of Operating Room Nursing 158 32 2 

Practice of Operating Room Nursing 159 6 1.5 

Historical Backgrounds of Nursing 112 30 2 

Physical Education 10 36 

Total 354 48 33 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 27 

UNIT III 

This Unit is also 52 weeks in length and there is a four-week vaca- 
tion during the summer term. An eight-week affiliation with the Visit- 
ing Nurse Service of New York, a family health agency, provides an 
opportunity for the student to care for patients in their homes and to 
teach members of the family to give necessary care between visits 
of the nurse. 

During another eight-week unit of time the student considers the 
special nursing problems related to rehabilitation and to long-term 
illness, including tuberculosis. She visits various agencies and facil- 
ities in the community which offer services to the aged and to those 
with special handicaps, such as cerebral palsy. A 12-week assignment 
to the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development includes 
experience in Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant 
floor and the unit for older children. A similar 12-week period is 
spent in the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic where the student 
has an opportunity to gain a keen appreciation of the causes of 
mental and emotional illness, of the ways in which such illness may 
be prevented, and knowledge of the newer methods of therapy for its 
relief. 

Experience is also provided in Diet Therapy and in Urological 
Nursing. 

The Program for this Unit is as follows: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 

Subject No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 170 75 5 

Practice of Pediatric Nursing 171 12 3 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 180 84 5.5 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 181 12 3 

Family and Community Health 115 20 1.5 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 116 30 1.5 

Practice of Public Health Nursing 117 8 2 

Chronic Illness and Rehabilitation 142 30 2 

Practice of Nursing in Chronic Illness and 

Rehabilitation 143 8 2 

Principles of Urological Nursing 153 15 1 

Practice of Urological Nursing 154 4 1 

Diet Therapy Practice 132 4 1 

Diet Therapy Conferences 133 8 0.5 

Physical Education 10 12 

Total 274 "iiT ~29~ 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

UNIT IV 

This last Unit of the professional program is approximately 27 weeks 
long, including a vacation of 23 days. 

There is a four-week assignment to the Private Patient Service, an 
experience incorporating the nursing care of patients who are being 
treated for Gynecological conditions. During another four-week period 
attention is given to the special needs of orthopedic patients and to 
the facilities and services available in the Medical Center and in the 
community for their treatment and rehabilitation. 

The student is now ready to accept almost complete responsibility 
for analysing and planning to meet the nursing needs of selected 
patients. She returns for eight weeks to one of the services on which 
she has had experience as a younger student and under supervision, 
carries out the nursing care of some of the sickest patients. She func- 
tions as leader of the nursing "team" and is assigned to charge duty 
on a pavilion for limited periods of the day or night. 

It is during this last Unit that each student selects a special area of 
nursing for concentrated attention and exploration. She may choose 
from nursing departments in the Medical Center and also from other 
agencies in the Community. Each year a few students who are espe- 
cially interested in Public Health Nursing have the opportunity for 
experience with the New York State Department of Health. 

Courses and experience in Unit IV are: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 

Subject No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Principles of Orthopedic Nursing 155 15 1 

Practice of Orthopedic Nursing 156 4 1 

Care of Gynecologic (Private) Patients 157 12 4 2 

Senior Experience 126 8 2 

Elective Experience 127 8 2 

Ward Activities and Relationships 125 15 1 

Professional Problems II 114 15 1 

Total 57 ~24~ ~7o" 

(+5 days) 

Grand Total (Professional Program) 1475 120 100 

(+5 days) 




A student makes friends with a small patient she is weighing in the Well-Baby 
Clinic of the Hospital. 




During her field assignment in Public Health Nursing, the student goes out into 
the community for experience in family health problems and care of the sick 
in their homes. 




~ CO- 

O w J 



* i J 






O rt 5 






Description of Courses 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 14-15.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. This course aims to develop in the student an interest 

in good body mechanics in work and play, and to teach her how she may apply 

this knowledge in her patient care. It also aims to develop interest and skill in 

those individual activities which will enable her to use her leisure time to greater 

advantage. 

90 Hours (Total) . Units I, II, III. Miss McDERMOTT, Miss HIRSHBERG. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course consists of both gross and microscopic anatomy. The 
gross anatomy includes dissection of the cadaver by the students. The microscopic 
work with prepared slides is directly correlated with the gross dissection. Significant 
embryological information is included. 

60 Hours. Unit I. Dr. BERRY, Dr. GREENE, Dr. HAGAMAN, Dr. ANDERSON, 
Dr. NORRIS, Mr. TAYLOR and Miss WRIGHT. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course consists of a study of the physiological systems and 
their integration into the total functions of the human body. It is closely related 
to the course in Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 
45 Hours. Unit I. Dr. PITTS, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG, Mrs. McLEOD, 
Miss MILLER. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY . A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism 
of food, and the composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

60 Hours. Unit I. Dr. du VIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GENGHOF, Miss 
KROOG, Miss MILLER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY . An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
45 Hours. Unit I. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE, Miss WRIGHT. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 
110. PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES IN NURSING PRACTICE. A problem- 
centered approach to the psychological needs of patients, including consideration of 
the biological and sociological factors contributing to these needs. The various stages 
of personality development and emotional responses to physical illness are discussed. 
Emphasis is placed on the nurse-patient relationship and the adjustment of the 
individual student to the nursing profession. 
30 Hours. Units I, II. Mrs. MacGREGOR. 

29 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. This course is designed to 
develop the student's ability to observe, understand and communicate with patients 
and their families and to plan nursing in relation to individual needs. The student 
is introduced to cultural and environmental factors which influence health and 
illness. The broad aspects of community organization are presented in a way that 
enables a student to see the relationship between the patient, the hospital, and the 
community. 

30 Hours. Unit I. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss BEISEL, Miss SOULE. 

112. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF NURSING. An overview of the history 
of nursing from earliest times to the present, studying what has constituted nursing 
and tracing factors which have strengthened or weakened it. Presented against a 
background of developments in the general care and welfare of the sick such as 
the care of mothers and children, old people and the chronically ill, the mentally 
ill, the tuberculous, and the evolution of hospitals, medicine and public health. 
30 Hours. Unit II. Miss DUNBAR, Miss SCHWARTZ and special lecturers. 

113. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS I. Consideration of the philosophical and ethical 
foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. Problems 
related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are presented by 
the instructor and the students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Miss LYONS. 

114. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS II. A survey of the nursing field, particularly 
the place of the professional organizations, legislation affecting nursing, types of 
educational programs in nursing, the role of different workers in the nursing field, 
international aspects of nursing, and nursing literature. 

15 Hours. Unit IV. Miss DUNBAR. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

115. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. A study of community needs with 
focus upon the total public health program. Emphasis is placed upon principles 
basic to public health nursing and their relationship to other services. 

20 Hours: Unit III. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss BEISEL, Dr. SMILLIE. 

116. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Emphasis is placed on 
developing an understanding of over-all policies, principles and functions as these 
relate to public health nursing practice. In addition, each student participates in 
four to six group discussion meetings of approximately two hours each, considering 
family situations known to them. The purpose of these group discussions is to 
strengthen and deepen their appreciation and understanding of the public health 
nurse's functions. 

30 Hours. Unit III. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE, and staff. 

117. PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Through carefully planned 
observations, conferences and individual guidance the student is given increasing 
responsibility for health work with a selected group of families. This includes health 
supervision of mothers and infants, children of all ages and adults, as well as the 
care of the sick in their homes. This experience is gained through affiliation with 
the Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Visiting Nurse Association of 
Brooklyn. 

8 Weeks. Unit III. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE and staff. 

(Elective Experience in Public Health Nursing: A few senior students who have 
outstanding records in general, who have shown particular interest and promise in 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

public health nursing, and who plan to enter this field of work in New York State, 
may be offered the opportunity for an elective experience with the New York State 
Department of Health.) 

OUT-PATIENT (AMBULATORY) NURSING 

118. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 
Nursing care of ambulatory patients, both children and adults, is taught through 
demonstration and informal family and community-centered conferences. Emphasis 
is placed upon health teaching, and the use of community resources in ensuring 
comprehensive patient care, and also upon the cooperation of the nurse with other 
professions in a program for health maintenance and for the prevention and control 
of disease. 

20 Hours. Unit II. Miss NEWTON, Miss McINTYRE, Miss SCHWARTZ, Mrs. 
WANG, Miss TSCHIDA. 

119. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Se- 
lected clinics provide experience in the pediatric, medical and surgical services. The 
student is helped to understand the value of continuity of patient care through 
working closely with other departments of the Hospital and with community 
agencies. 

6 Weeks. Unit II. Miss NEWTON, Miss McINTYRE, Miss TSCHIDA. 

FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND ALLIED COURSES 

120. ORIENTATION. These discussions give the beginning student a general 
concept of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the 
individual who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical 
and mental health of the nurses as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in 
her work. 

15 Hours. (Unit I 12 Hours; Unit II li/ 2 Hours; Unit III li/ 2 Hours.) Miss DUN- 
BAR, Miss FREDERICK, Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, 
and the School Physician. 

121. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING. This course is an introduction to nursing 
and to the various components which are an integral part of health maintenance 
and of the diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is designed to be a foundation 
for all the clinical nursing courses. Following an introductory unit which helps 
the student understand some basic concepts in nursing, the program is developed 
on a patient-activity basis. The student first learns to care for patients who are 
primarily ambulatory, either up and about in the hospital or visiting the Out- 
Patient Department. Then the student becomes concerned with patients who are 
in bed but who enjoy a great deal of freedom of activity. From the care of such 
patients, the emphasis then proceeds to the care of patients who are on complete 
bed rest. While the major content of the course is concerned with basic nursing 
procedures used in the hygienic care of the patient, in the diagnosis of disease 
conditions and in the treatment of various illnesses, a great deal of emphasis is 
also placed on the socio-dynamic factors in nursing. Emphasis is given to inter- 
personal relationships, age and emotional problems and problems of chronic and 
acute illness not only in the hospital but also in the general community. Beginning 
the tenth week in the program students have limited periods of supervised practice 
in the clinical divisions of Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Out-Patient. 

325 Hours. Units I, II. Miss FUERST, Miss VAN ARSDALE, Miss BIELSKI, Miss 
KURIHARA. 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

122. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems 
used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calculating 
dosages. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Miss PLACE. 

123. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowl- 
edge of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the 
nurse in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and 
commonly used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, adminis- 
tration, and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the importance of accurate 
administration of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours. Units I, II. Dr. MODELL, Dr. GARB. 

124. INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL NURSING. This course is designed to 
center the student's attention upon the need for informed observations on their 
patients. Conditions commonly found on all clinical services are considered, i.e. 
pain, fever, unconsciousness; the patho-genesis underlying symptoms is explored. 
Laboratory specimens and films are used extensively and there is frequent patient 
participation. Nursing and medical classes are closely correlated in an effort to 
help the young student begin to analyze the nursing needs of patients as manifested 
by the signs and symptoms of illness. 

30 Hours. Unit I. Dr. KELLNER and staff. Miss WRIGHT and nursing faculty 
from all services. 

125. WARD ACTIVITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS. Consideration is given to the 
basic principles which underlie effective working relationships with professional 
and non-professional personnel. The student is also guided in recognizing and plan- 
ning for the use of learning situations as they relate to patients or younger students, 
and she is introduced to the activities which she will undertake when assigned to 
act as team leader and to senior charge duty. 

15 Hours. Unit IV. Miss HARMON. 

126. SENIOR EXPERIENCE. Each student returns to the service on which she had 
her first clinical experience. She plans and carries out the care of patients with 
complex nursing needs, and has opportunity to observe and participate in the 
management of the pavilion, including leadership in the nursing team. 

8 Weeks. Unit IV. Faculty from all clinical services. 

127. ELECTIVE EXPERIENCE. Opportunity is provided for the student to explore 
a special area of nursing in which she is particularly interested. This may include 
one or more of the units in the Medical Center or other agencies in the community. 
A few students may have the opportunity for experience with the New York State 
Department of Health. The student is guided in making a study of some limited 
aspect of the field which she has chosen. 

8 Weeks. Unit IV. All faculty members. 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION. A short course in normal adult nutrition based on the courses 
in Biochemistry and Physiology. A study of the functions and food sources of the 
major food groups, their availability in the world and in the community, the needs 
of the individual and the relationship of cultural patterns to food habits and nutri- 
tion are included. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy 
are discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services.) 
Lecture and recitation. 
12 Hours. Unit I. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

131. DIET THERAPY AND COOKING. A course designed to present the under- 
lying principles in the treatment of disease by diet. It is accompanied by labora- 
tory work in principles of food preparation, and in the preparation of foods and 
meals included in therapeutic diets. The course is supplemented by conference work 
during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lecture, laboratory 
and recitation. 

36 Hours. Units I, II. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

132. DIET THERAPY PRACTICE. The application of the principles of diet- 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions and out- 
patient clinics of the Hospital. 

4 Weeks. Unit III. Miss STEPHENSON and staff. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss 
KROOG. 

133. DIET THERAPY CONFERENCES. Through conference discussions, inte- 
grated with the practice assignment, the student is oriented to the practical applica- 
tion of her knowledge of nutrition and diet therapy in the care of hospitalized 
and ambulatory patients. 

8 Hours. Units II, III. Miss RYNBERGEN. 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING. The principles and methods of 
nursing care for patients with medical, neurological and communicable disease are 
considered. Discussion of medical aspects of disease supplements and interprets read- 
ings concerning etiology, symptomatology, usual course pathology, complications, 
treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

68 Hours. Unit II. Dr. BARR and staff. Miss BROOKS, Miss PLACE, Miss 
STIRLING, Miss MALLORY, Miss CURTIS. 

141. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL 
NURSING. Supervised practice is offered in the application of nursing principles 
to the care of patients on the medical and neurological pavilions of the Hospital. 
12 Weeks. Unit II. Miss BROOKS, Miss PLACE, Miss STIRLING, Miss MALLORY, 
Miss CURTIS. 

142. CHRONIC ILLNESS AND REHABILITATION. This course places emphasis 
on rehabilitation and deals also with the care and prevention of chronic illness. 
Emphasis is placed upon the recognition of problems and needs of the patient as 
well as recognition of the nurse's needs in meeting these. Special consideration is 
given to the individual with tuberculosis. 

30 Hours. Unit III. Miss McCLUSKEY. 

143. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN CHRONIC ILLNESS AND REHABILITATION. 

This experience consists of practice in the Hospital as well as observation and field 
trips to many types of community agencies which cooperate in providing the care 
and service needed in rehabilitation of various types of patients and in the care of 
the chronically ill. Practice is carried out with selected patients; selection being 
made on the basis of age, life situation, economic factors, disability, goal and length 
of stay. Comprehensive care for these patients is emphasized and part of the practice 
is carried out cooperatively with fourth year medical students in the Comprehensive 
Care Clinic. Consideration is given to the particular contribution which the nurse 
can make in her relationships with patients and with health workers from other 
fields. This experience includes the care of patients with tuberculosis. 
8 Weeks. Unit III. Miss McCLUSKEY and other Instructors. 



34 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SURGICAL NURSING 

150. CORE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM, SURGICAL AND OUT-PATIENT 
NURSING. Lectures and demonstrations focus on the principles basic to the preven- 
tion, the etiology, and the control of disease in the plan for the total care of patients 
in the Operating Room, Surgical and Out-Patient Departments. 

66 Hours. Unit II. Faculty of the Departments of Operating Room, Surgery and 
Out-Patient. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. The fundamental principles of the 
nursing care of patients with general surgical conditions, surgical conditions of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat, and of the nervous system are presented by conference 
and demonstration. Emphasis is placed upon individualization of care including 
instruction and rehabilitation of the patient. 

24 Hours. Unit II. Miss KLEIN, Miss DERICKS, Miss FOSTER, Miss HENDERSON, 
Miss NIELSEN, Miss SAWYER. 

152. PRACTICE IN SURGICAL NURSING. Planned experience in the application 
of nursing principles to the care of patients with general or special surgical condi- 
tions. This includes supervised practice in surgical asepsis, patient teaching, 
therapeutic team relationships and in planning to meet patient's needs after dis- 
charge. 

12 Weeks. Unit II. Miss KLEIN, Miss DERICKS, Miss FOSTER, Miss HENDERSON, 
Miss NIELSEN, Miss SAWYER. 

153. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. The anomalies and diseases of 
the genito-urinary tract are described and principles underlying the management 
and nursing care of these conditions are presented. Preparation of the patient for 
self-care on discharge is stressed. 

15 Hours. Unit III. Miss KLEIN, Miss SWANWICK, Miss HILLS, Miss HEYMANN. 

154. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Opportunity is provided for the 
development of understanding and skill in meeting the special nursing needs of 
patients with urological conditions during the pre- and post-operative phase with 
particular attention to the patient's need after discharge. 

4 Weeks. Unit III. Miss KLEIN, Miss SWANWICK, Miss HILLS, Miss HEYMANN. 

155. PRINCIPLES OF ORTHOPEDIC NURSING. Consideration of the medical 
and nursing problems peculiar to those patients who are undergoing treatment 
for the correction of skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Emphasis is placed on 
prevention and rehabilitation, and the nursing principles which are basic to the 
care of all patients. 

15 Hours. Unit IV. Faculty from the Schools of Medicine and Nursing. 

156. PRACTICE IN ORTHOPEDIC AND REHABILITATIVE NURSING. Ex- 
perience includes the care of both ambulatory and hospitalized patients. Through 
field trips the student has an opportunity to become familiar with the many 
services needed by the orthopedically handicapped and with the agencies providing 
those services. 

4 Weeks. Unit IV. 

157. CARE OF GYNECOLOGIC AND PRIVATE PATIENTS. This experience 
offers an opportunity for the student to become aware of the needs of patients 
with a wide variety of socio-economic backgrounds. By means of supervised prac- 
tice, the student also gains an appreciation of the varied methods of treating 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 35 

patients with the same diagnosis. Included in this experience are classes and prac- 
tice in the care of patients with gynecologic conditions. 
12 Hours. 4 Weeks. Unit IV. Miss POOR, Miss AGNEW, Miss MEYEROWITZ. 

OPERATING ROOM NURSING 

158. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, dis- 
cussions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods of 
aseptic technique in relation to the care of patients at the time of operation. 
Immediate post-operative care is included. 

32 Hours. Unit II. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss SAFFIOTI, Miss JONES. 

159. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Supervised clinical ex- 
perience and study of the application of nursing principles to the care of patients 
in the Operating Room. Students are given the opportunity to observe and assist 
with operative procedures, to relate this experience to the total care of surgical 
patients and to gain an appreciation of the qualities and abilities essential to 
effective nursing in this field. Experience in the Recovery Unit is offered at 
this time. 

6 Weeks. Unit II. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss SAFFIOTI, Miss JONES, and staff. 

MATERNITY NURSING 

160. PRINCIPLES OF MATERNITY NURSING. A course planned to focus the 
student's knowledge of anatomy and physiology on the generative processes, and 
on the unique characteristics of the human infant. The emotional aspects of child- 
bearing, and a family-centered point of view provide additional basis for integrating 
earlier foundation courses with this clinical specialty. The Student is guided in 
application of theoretical knowledge to the nursing care of patients before, during 
and after the birth of the baby. The conference method encourages the student in 
self-expression as her understanding of the physical changes, adjustments and re- 
actions of the patient develops. Teaching techniques and attitudes are fostered by 
example and by explanation. 

78 Hours. Unit II. Lectures, conferences, films, special projects. Dr. DOUGLAS and 
staff. Miss RYNBERGEN; Miss HICKCOX and staff. 

161. PRACTICE OF MATERNITY NURSING. Students observe and care for 
mothers and newborn infants under supervision and with bedside instruction in 
the various techniques. Practice areas include Out-Patient Department, labor and 
delivery rooms, newborn nurseries and rooming-in units, and the post-part um 
pavilions. 

12 Weeks. Unit II. Miss HICKCOX and staff. 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Pediatric Nursing presents a 
study of the representative disease conditions of infancy and childhood against a 
background of the normal physical and emotional needs of infants and children. 
Supervised experience is directed to the effect of illness on the child and his family 
and to the use of nursing skills to aid his return to health. Correlated conferences, 
case presentations and role playing. 

75 Hours. Unit III. Dr. LEVINE and staff. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss STOKES, Miss 
ANDERSON, Miss RYNBERGEN and staff. 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

171. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Selected experiences in the applica- 
tion of knowledge to the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, and 
children in the Nursery School. Group conferences, demonstrations and nursing 
care plans. 

12 Weeks. Unit III. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss ANDERSON, Miss STOKES, Miss 
DON DERO, Miss FRIPP, Miss SIMMONS and the staffs of The Division of Child 
Development and Nursery Schools. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course deals with the 
history, pathology and treatment of psychiatric illnesses. The aim is to help the 
student develop knowledge and understanding of the basic principles involved in 
the nursing care of patients with personality disorders, from infancy to old age. 
The whole program is oriented to help develop in the student an understanding 
of self and relationships to others, an objective attitude toward mental illness and 
a broader appreciation of the nurse's role in helping the patient to solve the prob- 
lems of his illness and rehabilitation. The student is introduced to the work of 
allied health professions and social agencies. There are demonstrations, confer- 
ences and seminars. 

84 Hours. Unit III. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss FRANY, 
Miss MUHS, Miss WEAVER, Miss SPARGO, Miss NEWBURG, Miss PAIGE, 
Mrs. SIMON and staff. 

181. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The student receives supervised 
experience in the observation and care of the emotionally ill patient during the 
acute phase of illness, convalescence and rehabilitation. She participates in cur- 
rently approved therapies including psycho-therapy, occupational, recreational, 
insulin, electro-convulsive and other somatic procedures, and is helped to create 
a therapeutic environment for patients. Field trips, clinics and seminars. 

12 Weeks. Unit III. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss FRANY, Miss MUHS, Miss WEAVER, 
Miss SPARGO, Miss NEWBURG, Miss PAIGE, Mrs. SIMON and staff. 



Administration 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL- 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Director 
JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 



Board of Trustees 
of 



Arthur H. Dean \ 

Stanton Griffis / 

Deane W. Malott, President of the ( 

TT . . \ Cornell University 

University J 

John Hay Whitney, Vice-President \ 

Hamilton Hadley, President of The / Board of Governors of 

Society of the New York Hospital \ The Society of 

Henry S. Sturgis, Vice-President for ( the New York Hospital 

Finance I 

COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

F. F. Hill, Chan man Provost of Cornell University 

Deane W. Malott President of Cornell University 

Preston A. Wade ) • 77 TT . 

-r, , } Trustees of Cornell University 

Ruth Irish j ; J 

Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr. | Governors of The Society of 

Mrs. Charles S. Payson j the New York Hospital 

David P. Barr President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

Mrs. August Belmont Represen tative-a t-large 

Dorothy V. N. Brooks Dean of Women, Cornell University 

Mrs. John Jay Cole President, Committee for Scholarships 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

Joseph C. Hinsey Director, The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 

E. Hugh Luckey Dean, Cornell University Medical College 

Elizabeth Ogden, '44 Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Henry N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York 

Wilson G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive 

Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 

37 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

DeaNe W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D. President of Cornell 

University 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N. Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N. Associate Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A. Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A. Director of the Residence 

Mrs Claire Calhoun, M.A. Assistant Director of the Residence 

Jane Bevan, A.B. Assistant in Public Relations 

Mary Jo Munroe, B.A., B.S. in L.S Librarian 

Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Riddick Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki, A.B. Secretary to the Dean 

Carolyn Diehl, M.D School Physician 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Poor, Secretary 

Dr. Barr Dr. Hinsey Miss Lyons Miss Schubert 

Miss Carbery Miss Klein Miss Newton Miss Tuffley 

Miss Hickcox Dr. Luckey Mrs. Overholser Mrs. Wright 

CHAIRMAN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss Mallory 

Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Library Miss Brooks 

Records Miss Walters 

Student Affairs Miss Stirling 

Scholarships Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: 

Unit I 

Unit II 

Unit III 

Unit IV 

Student and Staff Health Miss Beisel 

Affiliating Students Miss Cramer 



ADMINISTRATION 39 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Audrey McCluskey '44 President 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. John Jay Cole President 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Office of Dean of Men, Dean of Women Caroline Hawes 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

College of Home Economics Jean Failing 

Professor of Home Economics, Chairman of Counseling Service 

College of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

Rollin L. Perry 

Assistant Dean 

College of Agriculture Howard S. Tyler 

Professor in Personnel Administration 
in charge of Vocational Guidance Placement 

Office of Admissions Robert Storandt 

Associate Director 



Faculty 



Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of 
Nursing. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia University, 1930. Diploma, 
Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, London, 
England, 1936.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; M.A., 1951. Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936; M.A., 1951.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

Kathleen Newton, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; Head of 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. [Anatomy], University of Washington, 1934; 
B.S. in Nursing, University of Washington, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 
Director of Public Health Nursirig. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 
1944.) 

Henderika J. Rvnbergen, M.S., Associate Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons Col- 
lege, 1922; M.S., Cornell University, 1938.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of 

Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in 

Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia 
University, 1932.) 

40 






FACULTY 41 

Elizabeth U. Wright, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing; 
Director of Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 19 IS.) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Nursing; Department 
Head, Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939, 
B.S., 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Muriel Carbery, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing 
Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1951.) 

Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B., University of Illinois, 1920; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1926.) 

Elinor Fuerst, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Christ Hospital School of Nursing, Jersey City, N. J., 1937; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1946; M.A., 1951.) 

Frances C. MacGregor, M.A., Visiting Assistant Professor, Social Science. (A.B., 
University of California, 1927; M.A., University of Missouri, 1947.) 

Audrey McCluskey, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing (Chronic Illness and 
Rehabilitation.) (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., Columbia Universitv, 
1948.) 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director 
Nurses' Residence. (Diploma, Bouve-Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; B.S., 
New York University, 1930; M.A., 1932.) 

M. Eva Poor, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing: 
Head of Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York Universitv, 
1950.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School of 
Nursing, Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York Universitv, 194S; M.A., 1949.) 

INSTRUCTORS 

Mildred Elizabeth Beisel, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., 
New York University, 1944; M.A., 1946.) 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Sen/ice. (Diploma in Nursing, Moses 
Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 
1945.) 

Berniece Cramer, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gxnecological Nursing; 
Evening Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, Hastings, Nebraska, 
1944; B.A., Hastings College, Nebraska, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; 
Nurse- Midwifery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1954.) 



42 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Constance Derrell, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lin- 
coln School of Nursing, New York, 1938; B.S., New York University, 1945; Midwifery 
Certificate, Tuskegee Institute, Oklahoma, 1946; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1948.) 

Mary J. Foster, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursi?ig Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1944; M.N., Yale University School 
of Nursing, 1947.) 

Eleanor Frany, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychia- 
tric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hackensack Hospital School of Nursing, 
Hackensack, New Jersey, 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; M.A., 1952.) 

Elizabeth Harmon, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing; Assistant Director of Nursing 
Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Pres- 
byterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; M.A., Columbia University, 
1951.) 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 1930; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas School 
of Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Vera R. Keane, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1949; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, 1951.) 

Emily J. Kroog, B.S., Instructor in Science. (B.S., New Jersey College for Women, 
1949.) 

Edna Elizabeth Lifgren, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Supervisor 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Roosevelt Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1954.) 

Cynthia Mallory, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing. (B.A., Scarritt College, 
Nashville, Tenn., 1935; R.N., The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 

Marie J. McIntyre, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Samaritan Hospital School 
of Nursing, Troy, N. Y., 1940; B.S., Syracuse University, 1950; M,S„ 1952.) 



FACULTY 43 

Dorothy McMullan, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; Assistant 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1950.) 

Marjorie Miller, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran 
Hospital School of Nursing, Cleveland; B.S., William J. Bryan University, Dayton, 
Tenn., 1949; M.S., Columbia University, 1954.) 

Eleanor Muhs, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nursing, 
Rochester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1918; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1954.) 

Edith Nielson, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 1954.) 

*Doris Place, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (B.S., Cornell University, 1942; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 

Wanda Robertson, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1945; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1945.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Department Head, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Michael's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Newark, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1954.) 

Janet R. Sawyer, B.S., R.N., Instructor, Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1946; B.S., Cornell University, 1946.) 

Doris Schwartz, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor , Compre- 
hensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist 
Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1942; B.S., New York University, 
1953.) 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Administrative Assistant for 
Staff Education. (B.A., Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas, 1940; 
Diploma in Nursing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1945; 
M.Ed., Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas, 1950.) 

Charlotte Stirling, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New England Hospital for Women and 
Children, Boston, Mass., 1940; B.S., Boston University, 1948; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1954.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

Mary H. Swanwick, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor in Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

* Leave of Absence 1954-5 



44 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Ethel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Out-Patient Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1944; 
Diploma in Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 

Martha Van Ardsdale, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1949.) 

Jeanette Walters, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Assistant Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York University, 
1944; M.A., 1949.) 

Mamie Wang, M.A., R.N., Instructor of Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, Out- 
patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Peiping Medical College School of 
Nursing, Peiping, China, 1938; B.S., Yenching University, China, 1938; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1943.) 

Dorothy E. White, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Delivery Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henry Ford 
Hospital School of Nursing, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, 1943; 
Midwifery Certificate, Maternity Center Association, New York City, 1951.) 

Lucille Wright, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., University of Colorado, 1950.) 



FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Robert F. Pitts, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D. Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

E. Hugh Luckey Dean 

James M. Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

R. Gordon Douglas, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles Berry, Ph.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

Wilbur Hagaman, M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

David Anderson, Ph.D Instructor in Anatomy 

Martha J. MacLeod, M.A Instructor in Physiology 

Dorothy Genghof, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Walter Modell, M.D , Associate Professor of Pharmacology 



Associated with the Faculty 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Marjorie H. Agnew, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1952.) 

Marie A. Anderson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Garfield Memorial Hospital School 
of Nursing, Washington, D.C., 1947; B.S., Hunter College, 1954.) 

Mary T. Bielskt, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1949.) 

Ruth Marian Brock man, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1931.) 

Theresa Christian, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Freedman Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Washington, D.C., 1937; B.S., Loyola University, Chicago, 111., 1911; M.S. Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1947.) 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service. (B.S., Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., 1939; Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital 
School of Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 

Laura Fawcett, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Assistant Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, 
'Philadelphia, Pa., 1936.) 

Ena Stevens Fisher, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Cheltenham Children's Hospital, London, 1927 and 
Gloustershire Royal Infirmary, London, 1930; London University, Sister Tutor 
Certificate, 1937 and Diploma, Nursing Education, 1952.) 

iCarol C. Fripp, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursi?ig; Assistant Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1944; Diploma 
n Nursing, Meharry Medical College School of Nursing, Nashville, Tenn., 1948.) 

iELEN H. Gilkey, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing, Evening Supervisor, 
^Surgical Nursi?ig Service. (A.B., Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif., 1933; Diploma 
in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1946; M.A.. Sacramento 
Itate College, Sacramento, Calif., 1953.) 

nez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursi?ig Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., 1935.) 

45 



46 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Sheila Hirshberg, M.S., Assistant in Physical Education and Recreation. (B.S., B.A., 
Kent State University, Ohio, 1950; M.S., Indiana University, 1953.) 

Martha E. Jackson, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night 
Assistant Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1937.) 

Dorothy Jackson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Gynecological Nursing; Assistant Super- 
visor, Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue School of 
Nursing, 1946; B.S., Hunter College, 1953.) 

Gladys Tyson Jones, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1951.) 

Marie Kurihara, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1950; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1950.) 

Claire Meyerowitz, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., Cornell University, 1945.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Johnston Hospital 
School of Nursing, Manila, P. I., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton 
Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School of 
Nursing, Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., 1952.) 

E. Jane Smith, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Cornell University, 1944.) 

Jessie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1924.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 
Waverly, Mass., 1933.) 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 



47 



LECTURERS 



Clinical Lectures 



Faculty of All Clinical Departments 

Cornell University Medical College 

STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 

Dju Ing, M.S Relief Administrative Assistant 

Elizabeth McKeown, R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Lois Cantrell, B.Ed., R.N Super-visor, Private Patients Service 

Lefa Rose, R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ruth Nielsen, R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Maude David, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lucy Hickey, R.N Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Clara Cooke, R.N Assistant Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Dorothy Knapp, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Anna Lyon, M.A., R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Jessie Macintosh, M.A., R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Francis Sheedy, R.N Assistant Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 



Bailey, Jane 
Blinn, Carolyn, B.S. 
Buehler, Meta, B.S. 

Bitting, Amy 
Cheroniak, Tillie 
Cullington, Barbara 
Dieterle, Doris 

Burnett, Dorothy 
Bosco, Antoinette 
Collins, Margaret, B.S. 
Derr, Barbara 
Edmundson, Ida 
Ellison, Dorothy, B.A. 
Farmer, Rosemary 

Aamodt, Agnes 
Bott, Alma 

Calder, Elizabeth, M.A. 
Colwell, Anna 
onner, Agnes 
Douyard, Dorothy 



HEAD NURSES 
MEDICINE 
Hazeltine, Louise, B.A., B.S. Myers, Margaret, B.S. 
Ibsen, Doris Spyrou, Anastasia, B.S. 



SURGERY 

Lubowska, Nina 
Miller, Jeanne 
Pruchnik, Blanche 
Schaefer, Elizabeth 

OPERATING ROOM 
Gerrior, Mary 
Husted, Salome Yauniskis 
Johnson, Bethea 
Kirby, Patricia 
McMichael, Adele 
Mitchinson, Barbara 



Spalding, Elizabeth, M.N. 
Tomasulo, Teresa 
Young, Eleanor 



Ondovchik, Anna, B.S. 
Rau, Rozalia Sturz, B. \. 
Shaw, Martha 
Sowa, Helen 
Sulette, Mary 
Vella, Mary 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Hammond, Grace 
Heard, Mary 
Huebner, Margaret 
Laird, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Leonardo, Yolanda 



Lovette, Virginia 
Mathews, Thelma 
Matus, Veronica 
Monahan, Gloria 
Young, Kathleen 



48 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Carman, Edna Stratton Foley, Alice Nussbanmer, Elsa 

Clark, Evelyn Lambert, Lucille Sweeney, Claire, B.S. 

Connolly, Kathleen, B.S. Larrow, Joyce Wagner, Carolyn 

Curley, Irene Liddle, Evelyn Wilke, Virginia, M.S. 

Evans, Alberta Maroshek, Helene, B.S. Veglia, Rosemary 

PRIVATE PATIENTS 
Canty, Mary, B.S. Kozitsky, Mary Reynolds, Mary 

Clark, Mary McKeown, Ann, B.S. Smith, Anne 

Gerchak, Helen Morgan, Agnes 

PEDIATRICS 
Bertagna, Elda Gallo, Louise Purcell, Fayetta 

Dunne, Marlene Gray, Freda Zemlock, Margaret, B.A. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 
Bartels, Henrietta, M.S. Janes, Carl Pitt, Marguerite 

Eisler, Vivian Lundgren, Grace Seiler, Elizabeth, B.S. 

Goodman, Gertrude, M.S. McKee, Beatrice Tait, Marjorie, B.S. 

Harrington, Jeanne, B.S. Morrison, Esther Ulatowski, Amelia 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 
Louise Stephenson, M.S., Director 
Susan Foresman, B.S. Susan Paige, B.S. 

Ann Hurevitz, M.A. Virginia Pearson Snyder, B.S. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Carol Sullivan, B.S. 

Denise Cutler Kimball, B.S. Anne Scruggs Walker, B.S. 

Mavis McLaran, M.S. Margaret Wvlie, B.S. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Mildred Spargo, O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Solle, M.A Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B Director, The Lying-in Hospital 

DIVISION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 
IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Comultant, Nursery School 

Eleanor Blumgart, B.A Director, Nursery School 

Mary Agosta, B.S Teacher, Nursery School 

Muhi Yasumura, M.A., O.T.R Occupational Therapy 

Mrs. K. Wtckman, M.S Psychiatric Social Worker 

Evelyn Fisher, M.A Psychologist 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Marian Randall, B.S., R.N Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Se)~uice of New York 

Eleanor W. Mole, B.S Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 

Mary E. Parker, M.S., R.N Director, Bureau of Public Health Nursing, 

and staff New York State Department of Health 

NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Director, Bank Street Nursery School 

Mrs. Wilhemina Kraber Director, Doivntown Community Nursery School 

Mrs. Dorothy Cleverdon T eacher-Education, Summer Play Schools 



Students in the School 



Name Year Address College 

Aarons, Geraldine 

Steinberg '54 Bronx, N. V. New York University 

Anderson, Anne 

Denisevich '55 Bridgeport, Conn. Carleton College 

Bailer, Joyce A '56 Warsaw, N. Y. Cornell University 

Barton, Priscilla W '55 West Roxbury, Mass. Cornell University 

Beeler, Paulene A '56 Fort Wayne, Ind. Indiana University 

Berkson, Gail '56 Bayside, L. I., N. Y. St. Law r rence University 

Bernhardt, Ruth '56 Yeadon, Pa. Temple Universitv 

Bickford, Deborah A '56 Pelham, X. Y. Bradford Jr. College 

Birchenall, Joan '56 Morrisville, Pa. St. Mary's College 

Bliss, Shirlev '55 Bloomfield, X. J. Swarthmore College 

Bloch, Steffi 'Goldsmith ...'55 Forest Hills, L. I., X. Y. Russell Sage College 

Bloch, Ursula M '56 Uarchmont, X. Y. Cedar Crest College 

Bolton, Barbara '56 Arlington, Mass. Simmons College 

Bonsignore, Antoinette M. '55 Elmira, X. Y. Elmira College 

Bosco, Rosemarie A '54 Winsted, Conn. St. Joseph College 

Boylan, Evelyn '55 Brooklyn, X. Y. Packer Collegiate Inst. 

Bradley, Sandra '56 Hamden, Conn. Simmons College 

Breslin, Patricia P '54 Richfield Springs, X. Y. Cornell University 

Brown, Mary D '56 Port Chester, X. Y. Xew T York University 

Brunner, Martha L '54 Plainfield, X. J. Houghton College 

Bruns, Marjorie R '56 St. Thomas, Y. I. Hope College 

Bruns, Marlene D '56 St. Thomas, V. I. Hope College 

Buckland, Katharine S. ...'55 Minneapolis, Minn. Smith College 

Bucklev, Irene '56 Bronx, X. Y. Hunter College 

Buttrick, Anne '56 Concord, Mass. Mt. Holyoke College 

Cali, Cynthia A '54 Jackson Heights, X. Y. St. Joseph's College 

Campbell, Margaret M. ...'54 Cortland, X. Y. Cortland State Teachers 

College 

Campion, Muriel '56 Bristol, Pa. Temple Universitv 

Carmody, Irene U '55 Westfield, X. J. X. J. College for Women 

Carruth, Marybelle '56 Little Xeck, L. I., X. Y. Bates College 

Cavero, Carmela X '55 Astoria, L. I., X. Y. Mt. St. Vincent College 

Cella, Joan M '54 Hoboken, X. J. Xew York University 

Cinquemani, Grace '56 St. Albans, L. I., X. Y. Queens College 

Clegg, Frances M '55 Bellerose, L. I., X. Y. Queens College 

Cole, Marie J '54 Oberlin, Ohio Oberlin College 

Collett. Ann M '55 Buffalo, X. Y. Hunter College 

Condello, Justine R '55 Great Xeck, L. I., X. Y. Chestnut Hill College 

Connell, Jane M '54 Jersey City, X. J. Rosemont College 

Cooke, Doris L '54 Xorth Plainfield, X. ]. Houghton College 

Cooley, Harriet '56 Pleasantville. X. Y. Simmons College 

Cornell, Carol '56 Endicott, X. Y. West Virginia Weslevan 

College 

Corrigan, Mary L '54 Scituate, Mass. Colby College 

Corrv, Judith Potter '54 Providence, R. I. Colbv Jr. College 

Dalbv, Nancy J '55 Marlboro, X. Y. Cornell Universitv 

Dannaker, Claire '56 Broomall, Pa. Gettysburg College 

* Including those graduating in September, 1954, but not those entering at that time. 

49 



50 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 






Name Year Address 

DeardorfF, Jane E '55 Gettysburg, Pa. 

Dehan, Elaine '56 Little Neck, L. I., N. Y. 

Dekker, Helen A '54 Bedford, Ohio 

Delle Donne, Marie T. ...'55 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DeLucia, Louise '56 New York, N. Y. 

Dewey, Barbara K '55 Albany, N. Y. 

Douglas, Jane B '55 Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Duane, Marilyn G '55 Asbury Park, N. J. 

Duboy, Vera S '54 Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Dudley, Priscilla A '56 Lyons, N. Y. 

Dudley, Virginia '56 Pelham, N. Y. 

Durkin, Mary L '56 Montclair, N. J. 

Eastwick, Marjorie E '54 North Arlington, N. J. 

Ennis, Margaret A '55 Plainfield, N. J. 

Erickson, Madeleine R. . . . '55 Dunellen, N. J. 

Farrell, Margaret E '56 Dedham, Mass. 

Figueroa, Maria F '54 Floral Park, L. I., N. Y. 

Finn, Patricia '56 Hempstead, L. I., N. Y. 

Fitzgerald, Susan '55 Salamanca, N. Y. 

Ford, Mary B '55 North Waterford, Me. 

French, Muriel F '54 Bronxville, N. Y. 

Funk, Elizabeth A '55 Pennsburg, Pa. 

Gansel, Inge U '54 Binghamton, N. Y. 

Gillette, Sally A '54 Fairfield, Conn. 

Gleick, Mary L '54 Jermyn, Pa. 

Gruenewald, Barbara .... '56 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Haight, Barbara '56 Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Hambleton, Joan L '54 Lancaster, Pa. 

Hamilton, Shirley M '56 Floral Park, L. I., N. Y. 

Hanks, Joanne Osterheld .'54 Palmer, Mass. 

Happich, Elizabeth '56 Maplewood, N. J. 

Hartman, Maxine '54 New York, N. Y. 

Hasto, Carol '56 Forest Hills, L. L, N. Y. 

Heaney, Mary C '55 Springfield Gardens, L. I. 

N.Y. 

Henderson, Grace B '54 East Orange, N. J. 

Henry, Grace-Marie '55 Chatham, N. J. 

Heston, Carolyn M '54 Akron, Ohio 

Hohloch, Faith J '56 Rockville Centre, L. I. 

N.Y. 

Hood, Ann K '55 Medford, Mass. 

Horn, Norma '56 Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

Horton, Johanna E '56 Clifford, Pa. 

Howard, Mary L '56 New Orleans, La. 

Husbands, Irma L '55 Boston, Mass. 

Hutt, Esther F '55 Watertown, N. Y. 

Huxster, Marilyn R '55 Kenvil, N. J. 

Iley, Jan '56 Dunedin, Fla. 

Imschweiler, Patricia A. . . '54 Tremont, Pa. 

Ives, Judith A '56 Woodbridge, Conn. 

Johnson, Paula J '56 Memphis, Tenn. 

Kane, Patricia M '55 New York, N. Y. 

Kerstetter, Jean C '55 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ketterer, Doris '55 Rye, N. Y. 

King, Mary A '55 Greenwood, Mass. 

Knappe, Irene A '54 Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

Knowlton, Jane '55 Greenville, Me. 



College 

Gettysburg College 
College of New Rochelle 
Denison University 
St. John's College 
City College 
Cornell University 
Colby College 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Susquehanna University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Chestnut Hill College 
Oberlin College 
N. J. College for Women 
Houghton College 
University of Mass. 
Brooklyn College 
Hofstra College 
Elmira College 
St. Lawrence University 
Penn. College for Women 
Penn. State College 
Cornell University 
Madison College 
Marywood College 
Brooklyn College 
Cornell University 
Dickenson College 
Mary Washington College 
Bates College 
Ohio University 
Queens College 
College of New Rochelle 

St. John's University 
Upsala College 
St. Elizabeth College 
Centenary Jr. College 

University of Maine 
University of Mass. 
Cornell University 
Penn. State College 
Tulane University 
New York University 
Roberts Wesleyan College 
Bucknell University 
Rollins College 
Bucknell University 
Albion College 
Vanderbilt University 
Marymount College 
Gettysburg College 
Gettysburg College 
N. J. College for Women 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
University of Maine 



STUDENTS 



51 



Name Year Address 

Kopp, Doris H '55 Leonia, N. J. 

Kourakos, Kathryn '54 Bronx, N. Y. 

Lagonegro, Catherine ....'54 Elmira, N. Y. 

Larson, Lydia J '54 Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

Leidenberg, Norma J '56 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Lewis, Joan C '55 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lewis, Phvllis M '54 Needham Heights, Mass. 

Leverage, Dorothy A '54 Easton, Md. 

Light, Frances '56 Hummelstown, Pa. 

Lord, Rae '56 Binghamton, N. Y. 

Mager, Helen M '56 Linden, N. J. 

Manning, Marilyn '56 Allentown, Pa. 

Mansell, Ellen '55 Stoddard, N. H. 

Marshall, Mary L '55 Wellsville, N. Y. 

Mayer, Barbara J '56 West Springfield, Mass. 

McConaughy, Lillian C. . . '56 Staten Island, N. Y. 

McCormack, Eileen '56 Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. 

McEldownev, Margaret R. '56 Lake George, N. Y. 

McLellan. Lillias T '54 Pelham, N. Y. 

MacGregor, Jean '54 Rochester, N. Y. 

Maxson, Judith '54 Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Meaden, Georgia E '56 Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Messmer, Barbara '56 Ardmore, Pa. 

Mever, Dorothv '55 Bronxville, N. Y. 

Millar, Mary L '54 Hamburg, N. Y. 

! Mitchell, Elizabeth '55 Wilmington, Del. 

Mitchell, Geraldine F '55 Manhasset, L. I., N. Y. 

! Mohr, Sara A '54 Alburtis, Pa. 

I Mullin, Colleen A '55 Binghamton, N. Y. 

Murtha, Nancy J '56 Bronxville, N. Y. 

Nagengast, Rosina A '55 Amityville, L. I., N. Y. 

, Nash, Carol H '55 Merion, Pa. 

. Nash, Jean C '55 Norfolk, Va. 

Noll, Carol M '55 East Lansing, Mich. 

! North, Helen Allhusen ...'55 Verona, N. J. 

Oehrlein, Marianne '56 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Olena, Ann Y '54 Hershey, Pa. 

Packer, Barbara J '55 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Palmer, Jean L '54 South Portland, Me. 

Paradis, Frances Davison. '54 Tohnsburg, N. Y. 

Patterson, Anne K '56 Columbus, Ohio 

Peeling, Elizabeth L '55 Roselle, N. J. 

Potter, Patricia A '55 Dover, N. H. 

Purinton, Jane '55 Needham Heights, Mass. 

Ramage, Elaine '56 Linden, N. J. 

Rees, Marjorie A '55 Nanticoke, Pa. 

Reese, Josephine '54 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Remington, Polly '56 Gladwvne, Pa. 

Ringen, Lucille A '55 West Orange, N. J. 

Roberts, Jane Madden .... '54 Ridgewood, N. J. 

Roehner, Gwen '56 Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Rusk, Jane '55 Marlboro, N. Y. 

Sadenwater, Susan A '55 Hempstead, L. I., N. Y. 

Sarr, E. Roxanna '54 East Greenbush, N. Y. 

Sawyer, Marilvn C '54 Bedminster, N. J. 

Schaefer, Anna M '56 Oyster Bay, L. I., N. Y. 



College 

N. J. College for Women 
New York University 
Elmira College 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Gettysburg College 
New York University 
Colby College 
Washington College 
Hershey Jr. College 
St. Lawrence University 
N. J. College for Women 
Cedar Crest College 
University of New 

Hampshire 
Cornell University 
University of Mass. 
Wheaton College 
Good Counsel College 
Bennett Jr. College 
Colby College 
Cornell University 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Stephens College 
Rosemont College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
St. Lawrence College 

Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Ursinus College 

Harpur College 

College of New Rochelle 

Hofstra College 

Duke University 

University of Kentucky 

Michigan State College 

Elmira College 

Cornell University 

Hershey Jr. College 

Cornell University 

University of Maine 

Cornell University 

University of Michigan 

Gettysburg College 

Colby College 

Bates College 

Keuka College 

Bucknell University 

Bradley University 

Cornell University 

Cornell University 

Centenary Jr. College 

St. Lawrence University 

Cornell University 

Hofstra College 

Cornell University 

Drew University 

Concordia Collegiate Inst. 



52 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Year 

Sc haffner, Jeanne E '55 

Schelle, Alma M '54 

Schmid, Rose-Marie '56 

Schmidt, Joan A '55 

Schult, Julia M. . '55 

Seekamp, Lois J '55 

Shaw, Janet '56 

Shields, Margaret '56 

Showacre, Mary A '55 

Siegle, Margaret I '55 

Spalteholz, Clara M '56 

Stanton, Beverly F '54 

Stanton, Hannah K '54 

Stein, Joanne '54 

Steiner, Joyce J '55 

Straumanis, Mara '56 

Strickland, Jeanne A '54 

Stmts, Ann F '54 

Takaki, Joyce '55 

Taranto, Mary R '54 

Taylor, Althea '55 

Taylor, Edith '56 

Terriberry, Joy '55 

Toshach, Susan '55 

Towne, Patricia M '54 

Trefny, Jeanne C '54 

Trever, Elizabeth S '55 

Triebe, Christine B '56 

Tully, Joan A '54 

Unkelbach, Joan '56 

Urquhart, Audrey L '56 

Van Name, Janet R '54 

Viola, Yvonne J '54 

von der Heyde, Alice D. . . '54 
von Geldern, Margaret ...'56 
Walrath, Martha Mysch ..'55 

White, Lois A '. '55 

Whittle, Natalie J '55 

Wiant, Betty J '54 

Winfield, Delia M '55 

Wood, Sally A '54 

Worm, Ruth '55 

Wosniok, Theodora '56 

Wygant, Mary L '55 

Zettle, Shirlee A '56 

Zvirblis, Violet '55 



Address 

Hershey, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Lewisburg, Pa. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Queens Village, N. Y. 
Wayne, Pa. 
Gloversville, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Cambria Heights, N. Y. 
Newark, N. Y. 
Waterloo, N. Y. 
Mount Carmel, Pa. 
Manhasset, L. I., N. Y. 
Menlo Park, N. J. 
Rolla, Mo. 
E. Greenwich, R. I. 
Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
New Canaan, Conn. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Kalispell, Mont. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Arlington, Va. 
Kingsport, Tenn. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Mattituck, L. I., N. Y. 
East Walpole, Mass. 
Staten Island, N Y. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Verona, N. J. 
Chatham, N. J. 
Morristown, N. J. 
Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Hershey, Pa. 
Scotch Plains, N. J. 
Englewood, N. J. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Scotia, N. Y. 
Bergenfield, N. J. 
Marlboro, N. Y. 
Emmaus, Pa. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



College 

Hershey Jr. College 
Queens College 
Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
Upsala College 
Denison University 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Queens College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Cornell University 
University of Pittsburgh 
St. Lawrence University 
N. J. College for Women 
Cottey Jr. College 
Colby College 
College of Wooster 
Hunter College 
Brooklyn College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Colby Jr. College 
University of Michigan 
Reed College 
St. John's University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Rosemont College 
Cornell University 
University of Mass. 
Cornell University 
Hunter College 
Hood College 
Drew University 
N. J. College for Women 
Hood College 
Hershey Jr. College 
Susquehanna University 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
N. J. College for Women 
Peace College 
Cedar Crest College 
New York University 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 

Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information 
which will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing 
school entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 

Date diploma received or expected 

College: name and location 

Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19.... 

Please send me an application blank 

(See page 13 regarding when to request and check if desired.) 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"I give the bequeath to Cornell University (or "I give and 
bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital") the 
sum of $ for the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift to the School of Nursing shall be 
made in whole or in part for any specific purpose in the 
program of the School such use may be specified. 



Index 



Absences, 20 

Accreditation of the School, 5 

Activities, 21; Nurses Residence, 21, 
Alumnae Association, 23, recreation, 
21; marriage and residence, 22; school 
government, 22; counseling services, 
23 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
37-48 

Admission, 10; general requirements, 
10; selection of a college, 11; educa- 
tion requirements, 11; age and 
health, 12; application, 13 

Advanced standing, 15 

Aim and Philosophy of school, 5 

Alumnae Association, 23, 39; Irene Sut- 
liffe Fund, 19 

Anatomy, 25, 29 

Application for admission, 13, 53 

Assistant professors, 41 

Assistants in instruction, 45-46 

Associate professors, 40 

Associated with the faculty, 45-48 

Basic nursing program, 24; professional 

curriculum, 24 
Bequest, form of, 53 
Biochemistry, 25, 29 
Biological and physical sciences, 29 

Calendar, 3 

Career opportunities in nursing, 4 
Ihronic Illness (and Rehabilitation) , 
27,33 
finical Nursing, Introduction to, 25, 32 
llinics, 9-10 

Committee for Scholarships, 18, 39 
Contents, 2 

Core Course in Operating Room, Surgi- 
cal and Out-Patient Nursing, 26, 34 
Cornell University, 7; degree, 15; ad- 
visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
j dents, 39; Medical College faculty, 
i 44 



Council of the School, 37 
Counseling services, 23 
Courses, description of, 29-36 
Curriculum, professional, 24; Unit I, 

25; Unit II, 26; Unit III, 27; Unit 

IV, 28 

Degree, 15 

Description of courses, 29-36 

Development of Behavior in Children, 
27,36 

Diet Therapy, 25, 27, 33 

Diploma, 15 

Division of Child Development, De- 
partment of Pediatrics, 27, 48 

Educational requisites, 11 
Elective Experience, 28, 32 
Emeritus professors, 40 
Executive faculty, 38 
Expenses, 16 

Facilities for instruction, 8-10 

Faculty, 40-44, associated with, 45-48, 
committees of, 38 

Faculty instructors, 41-44 

Family and Community Health, 27, 30 

Fees and expenses, 16, method of pay- 
ment, 17, maintenance, 17 

Financial aid, 18-19 

Fundamentals of Nursing and allied 
courses, 25, 31; Orientation, 31 

Graduation, 14, 15; advanced standing, 
15; degree and diploma, 15 

Gynecology, care of Gynecologic (Pri- 
vate) Patients, 28, 34 

Head nurses, 47-48 
Health service, 20 
History of School, 6-8 
Historical Backgrounds of Nursing, 26, 
30 

Introduction to Clinical Nursing, 25, 32 



55 






56 



NDEX 



Joint Administrative Board, 37 

Lecturers, 47 
Libraries, 8 
Loan Fund, 18 

Maintenance, 17 
Marriage, 22 

Maternity Nursing, 26, 35 
Medical Nursing, 26, 33 
Microbiology, 25, 29 

New York Hospital, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; 
nursing supervisors, 47; head nurses, 
47, 48; staff, 47, 48 

Nurses Residence, 8, 21 

Nursing, Fundamentals of — and allied 
courses, 25, 31 

Nutrition, 25; department of, 48; Nu- 
trition and Diet Therapy, 32, 33 

Obstetric (Maternity) Nursing, 26, 35 
Officers of administration, 38 
Operating Room Nursing, 26, 35; Core 

Course, 26, 34 
Orientation, 25, 31 
Orthopedic Nursing, 28, 34 
Out-Patient Department, 10, 26 
Out-Patient Nursing, 26, 31; Core 

Course, 26, 34 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9, 48 

Pediatric Nursing, 27, 35 

Pharmacology I, 25, 32; Pharmacology 
II, 25, 32 

Physical Education, 25, 26, 27, 29 

Physiology, 25, 29 

Private Patient Nursing, 28, 34 

Professional Problems I, 25, 30; Profes- 
sional Problems II, 28, 30 

Professors, 40 

Program, basic nursing, 24 



Promotion and graduation, 14-15; Ad- 
vanced standing, Degree, Diploma, 15 

Psychiatric Nursing, 27, 36 

Psychological Principles in Nursing 
Practice, 25, 29 

Public health affiliations, 10, 27, 48 

Public Health Nursing, 10, 27, 30 

Recreational facilities, 21 

Registration, State, 5 

Rehabilitation, Practice of Nursing in, 

27, 33; see also Orthopedic, 28, 34 
Residence and marriage, 22 

Scholarships, 18-19 
School government, 22 
School of Nursing, administrative of- 
ficers, 38, faculty committees, 38 
Senior Experience, 28, 32 
Social and Health Aspects of Nursing, 

25, 30 

Social Sciences, 29 

Social Service Departments, 48 

State registration, 5 

Student life and activities, 21-23 

Students now in School, 49-52 

Supervisors, nursing, 47 

Surgical Nursing, 26, 34; Core Course, 

26, 34 

Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 16 

Uniforms, 16; see also Maintenance 
Urological Nursing, 27, 34 

Vacations, 20 

Visiting Nurse Service of New Yorl 
10, 25, 48 

Ward Activities and Relationships, 2£ 
32 



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